brakes info

G

Guest

Guest
Hi Guys
Been doing a bit of research into brakes and such and would like to know a few things if possible.
Most of the info I looked at is very conflicting to say the least.
Do drilled and slotted discs really make a difference in the braking ability of the discs to provide that extra stopping power.
Do teflon brake pipes make a difference aswelll.
What is the actual difference in the disc diameter or the contact surface between the early 92 and the late August 92 80 series.
Presuming of course the change of caliper is made and the rims are 16" instead of the 15".
Has anybody tried these drilled and slotted brake discs.
Does synthetic brake fluid make any difference.
How do you adjust the rear brake sensor.
I ask all these questions because I now know I am looking at a complete front axle strip down because of the crap work Toyota put into doing the job in the first place.
I cant do it physically but can mentally, the cruiser is grounded and I have to find a guy who will do it, so maybe I need to assertane if he knows his stuff to start with.
Happy Holidays
John 92HDJ 80 1HDT.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi John,
I was thinking at one time of going for slotted disks and was advised
against it, because if you do any off-roading as I do from time to time, the
slots can trap stones and damage the disk. I don't know whether there is
any improvement in braking, I but I would think so as the disks seem to be
popular.
TTFN
Chas
London UK '94 1HDT 80 Auto, 110000+ miles, Safari snorkel, Custom Winch
bumper + winch, + Ray Dadd Rocksliders
----- Original Message -----
From: "john byrne" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2007 9:43 PM
Subject: [ELCO] brakes info
Hi Guys
Do drilled and slotted discs really make a difference in the braking ability
of the discs to provide that extra stopping power.
Has anybody tried these drilled and slotted brake discs.
Happy Holidays
John 92HDJ 80 1HDT.
 
G

Guest

Guest
PS John, I forgot to wish you a Happy New Year, I hope 2008 turns out a lot
better for you than 2007 did.
Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "Chas" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2007 11:03 PM
Subject: Re: [ELCO] brakes info
 
G

Guest

Guest
Ah thanks Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "Chas" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2007 11:15 PM
Subject: Re: [ELCO] brakes info
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here
G

Guest

Guest
Morning John,
The whole purpose of the brakes is to use friction to reduce the
forward motion of the vehicle and the by product of the friction is
heat. If the disks and the pads get too hot they don't work as
efficiently.
The cross drills in the disks are designed to dissipate the heat more
efficiently and the slots are designed to prevent a glaze building up
on the pads which occurs when they get too hot.
So the combination of cross drilled holes and slots will provide better
braking however you do need better quality pads to get the full effect
- preferably a ceramic based pad that absorb the heat better.
I can't see that they will make that much difference the pipes carry
the brake fluid - being made from teflon won't improve the flow that
much.
However stainless steel braided pipes can make a difference - when you
put your foot on the brakes the pressure builds on the pipes and is
supposed to push the pistons onto the pads forcing them onto the disks.
The pipes to the brake callipers on the LCs are made out of rubber
reinforced with a string matrix - these can expand a bit under pressure
- more so if the pipes are old - this expansion detracts from the
pressure going to the disks.
With stainless steel braided pipes they can't expand because they are
restrained by the braiding - stainless steel is used to avoid
corrosion. Since they don't expand the full pressure goes to the disks
- whicch is therefore more efficient.
Not 100% sure but I guess you get 10-20% increase in the surface area
annd also bigger callipers that take bigger pads - also giving a larger
surface area.
I've done it on cars in the past and they have made a noticeable
difference, particulaarly with some decent pads.
People often say you shouldn't use them on 4x4s because mud/grit can
end up getting into the slots and causing premature wear, however I
have yet to come across someone that has actually experienced this -
also it is worth noting that the Aussies seem to get on well with them
in all sorts of conditions.
The key thing with brkae fluid is to make sure it doesn't overheat in
the callipers leading the los of performance. Synthetic brake fluid
does help here, however there may be issues with seals etc - I've never
tried it in an LC so can't report more on this.
Do you have a manual - there is a good bit in it there - if not I'll
get it scanned and sent over to you.
Did you follow the advicce I gave the other day - what happened?
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Morning John,
The whole purpose of the brakes is to use friction to reduce the
forward motion of the vehicle and the by product of the friction is
heat. If the disks and the pads get too hot they don't work as
efficiently.
The cross drills in the disks are designed to dissipate the heat more
efficiently and the slots are designed to prevent a glaze building up
on the pads which occurs when they get too hot.
So the combination of cross drilled holes and slots will provide better
braking however you do need better quality pads to get the full effect
- preferably a ceramic based pad that absorb the heat better.
I can't see that they will make that much difference the pipes carry
the brake fluid - being made from teflon won't improve the flow that
much.
However stainless steel braided pipes can make a difference - when you
put your foot on the brakes the pressure builds on the pipes and is
supposed to push the pistons onto the pads forcing them onto the disks.
The pipes to the brake callipers on the LCs are made out of rubber
reinforced with a string matrix - these can expand a bit under pressure
- more so if the pipes are old - this expansion detracts from the
pressure going to the disks.
With stainless steel braided pipes they can't expand because they are
restrained by the braiding - stainless steel is used to avoid
corrosion. Since they don't expand the full pressure goes to the disks
- whicch is therefore more efficient.
Not 100% sure but I guess you get 10-20% increase in the surface area
annd also bigger callipers that take bigger pads - also giving a larger
surface area.
I've done it on cars in the past and they have made a noticeable
difference, particulaarly with some decent pads.
People often say you shouldn't use them on 4x4s because mud/grit can
end up getting into the slots and causing premature wear, however I
have yet to come across someone that has actually experienced this -
also it is worth noting that the Aussies seem to get on well with them
in all sorts of conditions.
The key thing with brkae fluid is to make sure it doesn't overheat in
the callipers leading the los of performance. Synthetic brake fluid
does help here, however there may be issues with seals etc - I've never
tried it in an LC so can't report more on this.
Do you have a manual - there is a good bit in it there - if not I'll
get it scanned and sent over to you.
Did you follow the advicce I gave the other day - what happened?
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hey Julian
Thanks for the reply.
As you said I am aware of the pros and cons but just thought I would see if
someone had used them on the 80 cruiser and if they were any good/ no
better/ or worse.
Also there is conflicting views about which pads work the best with them.
The best or ideal would be a pad that wont get torn up by the holes and
slots, last a reasonable amount of time but provide better stopping ability
and not be harsh on the discs either.
Where would I source the braided pipes.
I found out that its really only possible to upgrade to bigger calipers and
discs on the front.
This is because at the rear you have the hand brake set up which is
configured to the relivent size drum
and would I expect cost too much with too many different parts to replace.
Are the petrol 80s the same apart from the engine area , and are the
cruisers which are left hand drive the same for parts like steering bits or
would they be configured in a different way.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi the guys, been real busy here! Baby coming soon. But I must take
some time free to say some things.
1. Best Wishes for the new years 2008 to all you!
2. Look under at the reply of Julien to Jon and you see how completes
he is, we need to remember to thank him many times for him helpful
advices and for this list !!! Without Julien there we would be just
here in the poop of ignorance.
BB
2007/12/28, Julian Voelcker <[Email address removed]>:
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks