Center diff stuck

Gilbert v H

Active Member
Apr 7, 2010
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Hello

I drove about 3 miles this morning and parked the car. After about 20 minutes, I started the car again, but the center diff lock light never went again. I had to drive about 50 miles the and could not check, if it's just the light or if the lock is engaged. I tested this just now with the result that the lock is engaged.
Any ideas what to do?
What harm can it do (apart from the tyres) if I drive like that (I need the truck).
I already drove a couple of circles, backwards, forwards with and without low range, but the lock remains engaged.

I think it's strange, that it came on without me even engaging low range.

Many thanks
 

Jon Wildsmith

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Feb 24, 2010
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You haven't got a centre diff lock switch on the dash and not realised it have you? Sorry, got to check the obvious!

Driving with the centre diff locked puts a lot of strain on the drive train so it's not a good idea. I don't think I've heard of a centre diff locking all by itself before and it's not easy to get at to manually disengage :(

I take it you can feel the drive train binding and that's why you're sure it's locked?
 

pugwash

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Mar 1, 2010
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do you have any other lights on the dashboard?

do the tyres chirp when turning round tight corners? As jon says having the Difflock in will cause all sorts of issues.
 

Gilbert v H

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Apr 7, 2010
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No, there is no switch I have noticed so far, or which is obvious, but I better have a second look.

When I turned circles on tarmac, I seems the tyres are slipping.
To see if it's looked, I jacked up one rear tyre and tried to drive. The tyre did not spin and the truck was moving.
Last time I did this, the jacked up tyre was spinning until I engaged low range/ center diff, only then the truck was moving.

EDIT: OK, it seems I am not the brightest :oops: I do have the normal Center Diff Lock switch right on the dash. But I always though, that would work only in low range (especially as I always read here about in stalling an extra switch). Well, my one works in high range. I just have to go into neutral first, when press the switch and back in drive.
I tried this earlier today, but did not go into neutral so it did not work.

Anyway, problem solved and also diff oil changed on the side :)
 
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Jon Wildsmith

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:lol: that's a nice easy fix. That CDL switch is supposed to work in high or low range. If yours is locking automaticaly in low range then there is a wire you can disconnect so that it only locks when you push the button.
 

Gilbert v H

Active Member
Apr 7, 2010
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Aberdeenshire
Jon Wildsmith said:
:lol: that's a nice easy fix. That CDL switch is supposed to work in high or low range. If yours is locking automaticaly in low range then there is a wire you can disconnect so that it only locks when you push the button.
Yes, when I go in low range, the lock engages automatically.
 

Andrew Prince

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Feb 23, 2010
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A good example is if you're using low range to manoeuvre a heavy trailer around and you need to make tight turns etc - the locked centre diff makes the drivetrain groan a bit and there'll be some wind-up, which can cause a breakage if severe enough.

If you're playing off-road or on a low grip surface, then no harm/problem locking the CD. Also the shift pattern (for an auto obviously) in Low is pretty harsh - you can change that to shift "normally", i.e. not waiting until 3000rpm or whatever to change up.

Cheers,
 

Andrew Prince

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Feb 23, 2010
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The weakest link breaks first :? It's probably more about wear and tear - the CVs, half shafts and diffs don't enjoy it. I guess a weak CV or worn diff are the likeliest to go. But I don't know as I've never broken one :mrgreen:
 

Jon Wildsmith

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Never done it to destruction but IMO it would be the CV that's the weakest mechanical link but at low speeds unless the CV's were virtually falling apart I think the wheels will just slip and release the wind up.
 
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