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Engine wear when cold.

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Guest

Guest
Julian, the type of preheater I was thinking about are mains powered
that you plug in overnight. I expect our American / Canadian /
Scandinavian friends will be familiar with them. I have seen them in
Finland at the Saab factory in Uusikaupunki , great name, where they
were provided in quite a few places in the car parks. I have no idea if
they heat the water and or the oil. A couple of years ago Saab were
working on a preheating system where they stored the hot water from the
last journey in what amounted to a big Thermos flask , then using a
timer and a pump they recirculated it to prewarm the coolant the
following morning. Whether the idea reached volume production I have no
idea but it is a different take on the problem. Last winter I read in
the paper about a chap who left the car running on the drive, went into
the house to fetch something; came back out only to be booked by a
passing copper for leaving his vehicle unattended with the engine
running. So idling on the drive is all very well but you need to be
there.
Regards Gareth Jones '97 - 1-HDFT S.Wales.
 
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Guest

Guest
On 5 Jul 2004 at 13:19, Gareth Jones wrote:
That concept has vanished from this earth, because the eutectic salts
used for this (same kind of stuff is present in the better compressor-
fridges, as cold-storage/accumulator) were too aggressive for the
stainless steel heat-exchanger & tubings.
A poor derative is still around I believe, only storing the warm
coolant itself, which has a far less heat-capacity than these
eutectic salt solutions.
Followed that concept for over a decade in German mag's....it's
really dead, sadly.
Actual manufacturer was Canadian IIRC.
Or lock the vehicle, even better would be locked in gear, T-case
neutral, back against a solid wall, like you can with the Mul-T-Lock
gearbox locks (commonly locked in reverse; only downside is that you
can't use a reverse-beeper in this scenario....;))
(but!: there are now reverse-beepers that can be 'coded'; by quickly
engaging reverse twice in sequence it will be silent for the time
being, until switched again....this coding-feature now even exists
for lamp-integrated beepers (much more reliable than separate
beepers, at least when mounted under the vehicle, sitting in moisture
& dirt))
--
Bye,
Willem-Jan Markerink
The desire to understand
is sometimes far less intelligent than
the inability to understand
<[Email address removed]>
[note: 'a-one' & 'en-el'!]
 
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Guest

Guest
Gareth Jones said:
Fortunately we don't get opportunists getting that close to our house
so not so much a problem - I also suspect that our dogs would have them
before they could get the car :)
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
80less at the moment - Roll on June!
 
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