help/advice on steel

G

Guest

Guest
Hi all
I am trying to find out what grade of steel/alloy is used on some of the
suspension parts on my cruiser. Basically the parts I am interested in
finding out about are the upper control arms on the rear axle and the
pannard rod front and back. Since I have looked into this there is a
huge amount of steels & alloys with many different properties I.E EN 24
/ cromemolly alloy and so on and on ..
So can any one help with this question it would be a great help
Yours
Ray Dadd
Stourbridge / West Midlands / UK
80 Series 1995 (soon to be beat up & battered in the name of fun)
07739 628532
 
G

Guest

Guest
Ray
Probably some weird Japanese specification, but which will translate
roughly into a moderately high strength weldable structural steel.
What do you want the info for? Very roughly carbon (normal, get rusty)
steels come in the grades
"normal" yield about 200 - 250 N/mm2, yield about 430 N/mm2
"high strength" yield about 350 - 400 N/mm2, yield maybe around 500 -
550 N/mm2
"special" yields anything up to 1000N/mm2 or better.
Vehicles often use high strength steel to save weight, but stronger is
not necessarily better since:
(1) It may not take so kindly to being welded (more inclined to fail
later by fracture / fatigue)
(2) The difference between "yield" (when it bends) and failure gets
smaller.
(3) The "strain to failure", ie how much it will bend before it breaks,
gets less.
(4) It will cost more!
A builder will normally be using a "Grade 43 weldable structural steel",
and that is the bog standard product you will get from a steel merchant.
If you want high strength steel ask for "grade 50 weldable".
Likewise bolts: ordinary "black" bolts are grade 4.6 (ie 400 N/mm2
failure, yield 60% of this =3D 240 N/mm2). Strong bolts, with grade 8.8
marked on their heads, are 800 N/mm2 failure, yield 80% of this =3D 640
N/mm2.
Note that yield for a high strength bolt is 80% of failure, which is why
torque settings are important!
I have a book full of specifications, chemical compositions and
strengths if you want more info, but I'd need to know what you are
looking for.
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT

| Hi all
| I am trying to find out what grade of steel/alloy is used on
| some of the suspension parts on my cruiser. Basically the
| parts I am interested in finding out about are the upper
| control arms on the rear axle and the pannard rod front and
| back. Since I have looked into this there is a huge amount of
| steels & alloys with many different properties I.E EN 24 /
| cromemolly alloy and so on and on ..
|
| So can any one help with this question it would be a great help
|
| Yours
|
| Ray Dadd
____________________________________________________________
Electronic mail messages entering and leaving Arup business
systems are scanned for acceptability of content and viruses
 
G

Guest

Guest
Christopher
The reason I would like to know is that I am trying to make some parts
for my own motor and a friends (adjustable ones). We have the
skills/tools and knowledge to design and build the bits but lack the
knowledge to know what grade of steel is best for the job.
I have a idea what steel to use. But I thought best to ask on the list
as I find the list very useful or lots of other things / info.
Yours
Ray
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Christopher Bell
Sent: 27 September 2006 16:02
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] help/advice on steel
Ray
Probably some weird Japanese specification, but which will translate
roughly into a moderately high strength weldable structural steel.
What do you want the info for? Very roughly carbon (normal, get rusty)
steels come in the grades
"normal" yield about 200 - 250 N/mm2, yield about 430 N/mm2
"high strength" yield about 350 - 400 N/mm2, yield maybe around 500 -
550 N/mm2
"special" yields anything up to 1000N/mm2 or better.
Vehicles often use high strength steel to save weight, but stronger is
not necessarily better since:
(1) It may not take so kindly to being welded (more inclined to fail
later by fracture / fatigue)
(2) The difference between "yield" (when it bends) and failure gets
smaller.
(3) The "strain to failure", ie how much it will bend before it breaks,
gets less.
(4) It will cost more!
A builder will normally be using a "Grade 43 weldable structural steel",
and that is the bog standard product you will get from a steel merchant.
If you want high strength steel ask for "grade 50 weldable".
Likewise bolts: ordinary "black" bolts are grade 4.6 (ie 400 N/mm2
failure, yield 60% of this = 240 N/mm2). Strong bolts, with grade 8.8
marked on their heads, are 800 N/mm2 failure, yield 80% of this = 640
N/mm2.
Note that yield for a high strength bolt is 80% of failure, which is why
torque settings are important!
I have a book full of specifications, chemical compositions and
strengths if you want more info, but I'd need to know what you are
looking for.
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
| Hi all
| I am trying to find out what grade of steel/alloy is used on
| some of the suspension parts on my cruiser. Basically the
| parts I am interested in finding out about are the upper
| control arms on the rear axle and the pannard rod front and
| back. Since I have looked into this there is a huge amount of
| steels & alloys with many different properties I.E EN 24 /
| cromemolly alloy and so on and on ..
|
| So can any one help with this question it would be a great help
|
| Yours
|
| Ray Dadd
____________________________________________________________
Electronic mail messages entering and leaving Arup business
systems are scanned for acceptability of content and viruses
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Ray,
If you into plagiarism, Slee Offroad have the made up components so you
can slice up your own suspension and then weld their bits in - have a
look at http://www.sleeoffroad.com and search under suspension - from
there you should be able to see what steel they are using - ISTR they
specify it.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here
G

Guest

Guest
Julian
All ready know about cristo @ slee (great guy).
But the problem is that with UK MOT rules you are not allowed to do self
weld ish jobs on you suspension(from what I have been told). but if I
can make them from scratch then I can get them plated and then they
would look as if I have brought them .plus I think the cost of them is
quite high to get them from the US to here inc duty and so on .
That's why I have copied the slee rock sliders and made an identical
pair but added some high lift jacking points to them at each end. Also
at the mo I am working on bumpers as well as a few other things.
hopefully when we all meet up at the next meet you will be able to see
the mobs I have done and get some comments / input from you as to what
you think ect ect
Yours
Ray
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Julian Voelcker
Sent: 27 September 2006 17:31
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] help/advice on steel
Hi Ray,
If you into plagiarism, Slee Offroad have the made up components so you
can slice up your own suspension and then weld their bits in - have a
look at http://www.sleeoffroad.com and search under suspension - from
there you should be able to see what steel they are using - ISTR they
specify it.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
HJi Ray
What did it cost you to make the slidders for the cruiser.
cheers
john
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ray Dadd" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 5:44 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] help/advice on steel
 
G

Guest

Guest
Don't know john yet
As I have just finished them .but i had to buy long lengths so the cost
of steel to actual build ratio is quite high at the mo .
When I have worked out the time and direct material cost I will let you
know
Yours truly, ray
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks