Huge loss of economy- could be autobox related but any advice welcome

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1) ECU malfunction -
Good point there, one engine, can't remember whose, on Toyota, exhibits
problems with the auto box lockup with there is a fault with the MAF sensor.
Malcolm
Stafford (UK)
FJ45 '75 & FJ45 '76
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18:39
 
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as someone who is looking to buy an 80 in the next year or so - all these
problems with electrickery are starting to make me wary. julian et al, is
there an 80 (such as the very early, circa 88-91, models) the ones to look
out for? or does every issue of the 80 have it's positives and negatives?
jeremy "--" --
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1) ecu malfunction - there's an ecu above the uk drivers feet which controls
the transmission solenoids. is there 12v at the ecu lock up solenoid output
pin when lock up should be active? if not it could be a faulty ecu or faulty
inputs to the ecu e.g. failed throttle position sensor etc.
2) lock up solenoid or wiring continuity fault - it's not unheard of for a
fault to develop in the wiring loom especially around the transmission
tunnel and although i don't think i've read anyone only having lock up
problems, it's worth testing. disconnect the ecu multiplug (above drivers
feet) and check the resistance between the lock up solenoid output pin on
the ecu plug and vehicle ground. look in the fsm for the expected range of
values, something like 4-15 ohms from memory. i can probably take a photo to
help you identify the tranny ecu but it's not the most obvious one, it's the
higher and slightly harder to get at one.
3) lock up solenoid mechanical fault - the solenoid acts like a pressure
relief for the lock up hydraulic circuit and is normally open allowing fluid
flow. when electrical power is applied the solenoid closes and hydraulic
pressure then occurs in the lock up circuit, forcing the lock up friction
surfaces against the tc housing. the fsm describes testing a solenoid but
basically drain tranny fluid, drop the oil pan, solenoids are visible.
remove lock up solenoid, blow compressed air @ 110psi or so through the
solenoid and apply electrical power. if any air is still flowing through the
solenoid when powered then it's faulty and should be replaced.
4) lack of hydraulic pressure in the torque converter lock up circuit. in a
transmission that is otherwise working ok this is most likely to be caused
by a blocked cooler / cooler pipes. check you have a good flow of fluid in
and out of the cooler. without a proper flow gage the best you can do is
pull a pipe at the oil cooler inlet on the bottom of the radiator and run
the engine for a 5-10 seconds. fluid should squirt out the end of the pipe,
not dribble. replace the pipe and do the same again with the other pipe.
iirc the pipe that goes to the uk drivers side of the cooler is the flow
from the tranny so fluid will come out of the rubber hose and the pipe that
goes to the uk passenger side of the cooler is the return so fluid will come
out of the cooler. needless to say this is a very messy job unless you
attach extra bits of tube to direct fluid into a bucket. google for
transmission fluid changing techniques with a bucket to confirm my memory of
which pipe is flow and which is return. given that you got to the lakes and
back without the tranny temp warning light coming on i doubt this is a
factor.
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10:24
 
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ah john - thank you for replying...
i need an upgrade on my current vehicle and all roads lead to an 80. however
you are correct in your assumption in that i am a tight git and once i own
(and personalize) a vehicle i am loathe to dispose of it. the next vehicle
is for our trip home in 2010 and it is also be left in zim as a rental
vehicle when we're finished so reliability and longevity are both
pre-requisites. i suppose i've just got used to my old manual non-efi 1kz-t
engined 4runner where you could actually get by without any electrics if
necessary.
btw: what is a pic?
jeremy "--" --
www.--
home: +44 (0) 1273 600 793
mobile: +44 (0) 7878 010 352
skype name:
-----original message-----
from: [email address removed] [mailto:[email address removed]] on
behalf of jon wildsmith
sent: 29 january 2008 15:25
to: [email address removed]
subject: re: [elco] huge loss of economy- could be autobox related but any
advice welcome
hi jeremy,
are you concerned about reliability or logevity of parts supply? 80's are
generally reliable and are probably much more likely to suffer a
mechanical fault than an electrical one. what electronics there are on an
80 are very simple. most so called ecu's are just a box of relays i think.
the only complicated ecu i can think of is the auto transmision and that
could be replaced with a pic if you're worried about ecu availability in
20 years time.
jon.

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version: 7.5.516 / virus database: 269.19.15/1249 - release date: 29/01/2008
09:51
no virus found in this outgoing message.
checked by avg free edition.
version: 7.5.516 / virus database: 269.19.15/1249 - release date: 29/01/2008
09:51
 
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