Lazy door lock

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Guest

Guest
Morning all
Just wondered if anyone had come across this before. Front passenger door
lock seems to be lazy. If I lock the doors using the alarm fob, 3rd party
alarm fitted, all the doors lock as normal but more often than not, the
front passenger door doesn't. If I unlock and then lock again a couple more
times it all seems to work. The same happens with unlocking - most times the
passenger door won't open and I open up using the rocker switch on the
drivers door arm rest. I'm assuming I've got one dodgy solenoid, in the
door. For 3 weeks in Africa recently all worked brilliantly but I expect the
rough roads shook something into place. We're back to the lazy lock now.
I'll live with it for a bit as I can't face a morning in the cold taking the
door apart but if anyone has had similar experiences I'd be grateful to hear
back. I'm guessing that it will be best to replace the solenoid in the door
as everything works ok.
Sounds like Sunday was a great day.
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jeremy,
Yes, it could be a lazy solenoid or just a case that the original grease on the
connections has dried out and stiffened up in the cold.
I had a similar thing in my old 80 and found a dose of WD40 on the locking
mechanism and the rods connecting it to the solenoid did the job, although you
might want to consider using one of these 'dry lube' style spray lubricants
which won't attract dust and other rubbish in the future.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jeremy,
Yes, it could be a lazy solenoid or just a case that the original grease on the
connections has dried out and stiffened up in the cold.
I had a similar thing in my old 80 and found a dose of WD40 on the locking
mechanism and the rods connecting it to the solenoid did the job, although you
might want to consider using one of these 'dry lube' style spray lubricants
which won't attract dust and other rubbish in the future.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hello,
I've been struggling with this problem for more than a year.
Lubricating does help but only for a while. I took the damn thing
apart twice, regreased the joints, looked into the motor housing,
regreased the gears and bushes, straightened the metal rods behind the
trim ... and still nothing!
I can't remember now but it seems the door locks are controlled by an
electrinic gismo (when you try engaging the locks while a door is open
it wil bounce back). Now, as it appears it's always the front
passenger door that is affected, it's posible that bypassing the gismo
might help.
Jeremy, does the f. pas. lock always work when you use the door key in
the driver's door?
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 11/25/05, Julian Voelcker <[Email address removed]> wrote:
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G

Guest

Guest
Thanks Julian.
Presumably this is a spray-through-the-lock job...? No snow here but cold
enough to keep me away from doing anything to the car at the moment...
Will be in touch off list in a day or so...
On 25/11/05 11:10, "Julian Voelcker" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
G

Guest

Guest
On 25/11/05 11:35, "Roman" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
No. It usually takes 2 or 3 turns of the key to lock it. And if I unlock
with the key in the drivers door, it usually takes 2 or 3 turns to unlock
it...
I have now got into the habit of rocking the locks back and forwards on the
driver's door, and then locking on the alarm fob once out of the car. This
seems to fool it. Because the locks worked perfectly in n africa for a
while, there must be a loose contact, or similar, somewhere in the chain.
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
22a Alexandra Grove
London N4 2LF
Tel: 020 8800 4987
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jeremy,
No. That will only lubricate the cylinder where the key goes. There
are a series of rods linking the door handle/lock unit on the outside
of the door to the electrical solenoid and the actual locking
mechanism.
You need to take off the actual door trim to get to it. You can pull
of the arm rest part of the trim at the back, and the trim holding the
window switch and then there are about three large phillips headed
screws holding on the brab handle and also underneath the trim you have
removed.
When you remove the piece of the trim containing the window switch,
undo the wire going into the back of the switch.
Once you have undone the screws you will need a paint scraper or
similar to run round the edge of the trim to pop out the plastic clips
that are used to hold it in place. Once you have them all undone you
should be able to lift the trim up and off (it is hung with a lip
sliding down the widow slot at the top of the door).
You will then need to peel back the plastic on the lock edge of the
door - this is relatively easy with the aid of a sharp knife, but make
sure you don't fold it over at all - the black masic used to seal/stick
the plastic to the door is very sticky and once it folds back on it's
self it is a knightmare to prise apart.
Once you have peeled it back enough you should have access to all you
need.
If you feel brave enough to venture outside to do it and get stuck,
give me a call.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jeremy,
No. That will only lubricate the cylinder where the key goes. There
are a series of rods linking the door handle/lock unit on the outside
of the door to the electrical solenoid and the actual locking
mechanism.
You need to take off the actual door trim to get to it. You can pull
of the arm rest part of the trim at the back, and the trim holding the
window switch and then there are about three large phillips headed
screws holding on the brab handle and also underneath the trim you have
removed.
When you remove the piece of the trim containing the window switch,
undo the wire going into the back of the switch.
Once you have undone the screws you will need a paint scraper or
similar to run round the edge of the trim to pop out the plastic clips
that are used to hold it in place. Once you have them all undone you
should be able to lift the trim up and off (it is hung with a lip
sliding down the widow slot at the top of the door).
You will then need to peel back the plastic on the lock edge of the
door - this is relatively easy with the aid of a sharp knife, but make
sure you don't fold it over at all - the black masic used to seal/stick
the plastic to the door is very sticky and once it folds back on it's
self it is a knightmare to prise apart.
Once you have peeled it back enough you should have access to all you
need.
If you feel brave enough to venture outside to do it and get stuck,
give me a call.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Jeremy
Just a thought...
Is it any better when you've driven for a few miles? And if so could it
be due to the battery voltage dropping due to old age?
Christopher Bell
| No. It usually takes 2 or 3 turns of the key to lock it. And
| if I unlock with the key in the drivers door, it usually
| takes 2 or 3 turns to unlock it...
|
| I have now got into the habit of rocking the locks back and
| forwards on the driver's door, and then locking on the alarm
| fob once out of the car. This seems to fool it. Because the
| locks worked perfectly in n africa for a while, there must be
| a loose contact, or similar, somewhere in the chain.
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G

Guest

Guest
Don't think so as I have 2 new Optima red tops, new about 6 months ago, and
even after a day thrashing up and down pistes the lock didn't perform any
better. I am assuming you meant old batteries...
jeremy
On 25/11/05 13:02, "Christopher Bell" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
G

Guest

Guest
Thanks Julian. I will get round to it soon and may hunt around for a
solenoid before hand although can't imagine there will be many around the
scrappies
Jeremy
On 25/11/05 12:56, "Julian Voelcker" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
G

Guest

Guest
Jeremy
| Don't think so as I have 2 new Optima red tops, new about 6
| months ago, and even after a day thrashing up and down pistes
| the lock didn't perform any better. I am assuming you meant
| old batteries...
Yes I did.
Oh well, it was just an idea (prompted by my memories of an unnecessary
starter rebuild following a duff cell in one battery.)
Did a bit of piste-bashing here today. In fact I had to rescue our 8
year old whose school bus got stuck on the way to school. Sadly it's all
melting now, but we had about 2" at 7am.
CB
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G

Guest

Guest
Chris,
It's definitely not related to battery current.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Guys
Ill tell you Toyota will not get any prizes for their electrics.
What with the head light harness, the door locks, and lets not forget our
favorite, the windows.
As we are all in the cold again its amazing that the windows again in my
cruiser will not work properly and the colder it gets the worse they get.
What crap.
I tried to get my window down for a good while and then when it did , would
it go back up O no way why should it.
After all here is a vehicle that can traverse mountains and swamps and
deserts and be pushed and pushed to its limits , well so I have heard
anyway, and perform well.
I cant get my windows to work and then when they dogo down just to p--- me
off they will stay down jsut cause its really cold and raining or snowing
and I like that blowing in my ear and causing whats left of my hair to
stiffen like a board..
I know there is the usual clean the runners and spray down silicone etc but
why are the windows so bad in the cold and is there a real good solution.
Cheers
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Ireland
 
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