Ok im off again

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Guest

Guest
Hi Guys
Just a few thoughts or questions.
How difficult is it to replace the rear wheel bearings.
How long would it take.
Also relating to the wiring blowing a fuse cause it touched something it
shouldn't have.
What would happen if you were in deep water would the water act like a
conductor and have all the fuses blowing.
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
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Believe it or not, but water is actually an insulator, but a poor one.
TTFN
Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "John Byrne" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 8:23 PM
Subject: [ELCO] Ok im off again
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi Chas
But if water is an insulater why then is the perception that water will
carry currant.
Have you even got a shock from around a light socket when wallpapering.
Or what about dropping an electrical item in a bath when you are in it.
I think water conducts not insulates.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDt
SNIP
Believe it or not, but water is actually an insulator, but a poor one.
TTFN
Chas
 
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Guest
No, no, believe me, water IS an insulator, if you place a live and a neutral
in water just far enough apart current will flow and boil the water
eventually, but move them further apart and no current will flow therefore
it is an insulator. Always turn the power off when wallpapering though!
TTFN
Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "John Byrne" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 10:31 PM
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Ok im off again
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi John,
"But if water is an insulater why then is the perception that water will
carry currant."
That's simple, because currant is lighter than water :)
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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Guest
Does this make sense?
Nothing is a perfect conductor and nothing is a perfect insulator
hence everything can be viewed as either a poor conductor and good
insulator, poor insulator and good conductor water is somewhere between the
two.
ie every material will conduct or insulate to some degree depending on the
voltage concerned?
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford, UK
1975 FJ45 Pickup (In Work)
_______________________________
I think water conducts not insulates.
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Guest

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Ah Guys
Ill I was thinking was would water help blow a fuse if it connected two
parts which were not suppossed to be connected thats all.
No takers on how hard a job it is to change the rear wheel bearings.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
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Guest

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The boiling is just heat dissipation, current flow will continue after that
point
to give the relationship between conductors and insulator in a mathematical
form
resistivity (= 1/conductivity)
and we know there are no perfect conductors or insulators
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford, UK
1975 FJ45 Pickup (In Work)
_______________________________
No, no, believe me, water IS an insulator, if you place a live and a neutral
in water just far enough apart current will flow and boil the water
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Hi John,
Much the same as the fronts, the biggest difference is that you ideally need
a toothed socket to tighten up the bearings - yes you can do it with a cold
chisel, but that gets messy and you don't have any control over the torque.
about an hour per side - can't remember precisely, haven't done some for
ages.
Generally not, unless you are going through salt water and even then the
resistance of the water is sufficient not to cause problems for the average
12 volt system on a car.
With petrol cars it is slightly different because of the high voltage
required for the spark on the engine - this can travel a distance in water
which is why you always used to have problems with older cars when ever it
rained - the mini was notorious for this having the distributor in front of
the engine.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Hi Julian,
I remember that well, I used a rubber washing up glove to protect the
distributor, one finger for each plug lead and the thumb for the HT lead.
TTFN
Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "Julian Voelcker" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Saturday, September 16, 2006 8:30 AM
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Ok im off again
 
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Guest

Guest
OK, I'll pitch in then.
I have been saying since I was at school that electricity is not
a conducted by water, you cannot put a wire with a supply on it into a
bowl of water and take that supply out the other side. Also, you
cannot measure from the water to ground and get a reading.
By the same token, water is not an insulator either. You could
not put your wore through the bowl of water and expect to get a
voltage at the other side to complete your circuit.
I have always tried to impress on people that water is an exciter
of electricity, not either of the other two.
Regards, Clive.
 
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OK, I meant wire.
On 9/16/06, Clive Marks <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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My last post on the subject.
Clive,
I think you are a little of the mark here. Perhaps you are confusing a
different type of conductors, tap water is a conductor primarily because it
has impurities which make it an electrolyte, anyway some comments below.
(Comments in the interests of stopping anyone chasing red herrings with
electrical faults)
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford, UK
1975 FJ45 Pickup (In Work)
_______________________________
Actually you could do the above - the water would act like a large value
resistor and the reading would be there, infact you would get a higher
voltage ie less drop the closer you put the meter probe to where the wire
entered the bowl.
Also if you run a bare wire through water the electricity will not stop
flowing - try it with a 6V battery and a bulb.
Table below shows conductivity and resisivity values for water and copper.
Resisivity is the inverse of conductivity.
Conductivity Resisitivity
siemens per metre ohm meter
Tap water 0.05 20
Sea water 5 0.2
Copper 60,000,000 0.00000001666
Unfortunately calculations are more complex (ie use complex numbers) for AC
circuits but imagining Russia uses DC at 230V and the razor blade & water
boiling example;
Resisitivity of tap water (20 ohm meter) multiplied by distance between the
blades in meters (0.025) divided by the area of the blades (0.04m * 0.02m 0.0008) gives a resistance of 625 ohm
P (Power in Watts) = V^2/R
At 230V DC then P = 230 * 230 / 625 = 85 Watts
That seems a bit of a slow boil so the blades might need be closer together,
and Russian water probably had more impurities which make it more
conductive. With sea water the equation gives about 8500 Watts ie 8.5 KW!
(So for a quick cuppa add salt)
Now you see why Reno and Julian both mentioned salty or sea water - also why
people who live near the coast and have petrol cars are careful about
driving through sea water.
I know of someone who drove through the puddles from the spray on the sea
front without a problem, but the next morning the engine wouldn't start, he
left the car, got the bus to college, tried the car when he got home and
found it started, next morning it wouldn't start again. In the end his dad
looked at it and worked out that the salt had dried on the engine and leads
but was combining with condensation being in the mornings, during the day
the engine would dry out and be OK in the afternoon, until the next day.
Malcolm
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