Overland Vehicle Security

G

Guest

Guest
Alright Lads
Would be interested on any experiences re vehicle security while
overlanding. Any problems encountered and possible prevention measures?
Have sourced some tidy door mounted hasp locks for the 4 doors + one on
the fuel filler from http://www.overlandhardware.com/protect.html one
key fits all job
Also plan on fitting an alarm and steering lock.
Rear side windows will be secured internally with some light weight
aluminium sheeting I can get from a mates printing workshop.
Going to put an old gun safe in the Back and keep it accessible from the
front for ease of storage of bulky valuables when vacating the vehicle.
Another safe will be put somewhere else for passports and other very
valuable documents/cash etc - possibly bolted into the passenger side
footwell?
A third hidee hole might be a good idea for emergency cash also - any
good ideas for locating this
Other possible weak points that I haven't addressed yet are:
- The tail gate window.
- Driver and passenger door window glass
- The sun roof
- Engine Bay
- Wheels
- ???? Anything else?
I plan on teaming up with other overlanders reroute for security and
craic but will be travelling on my own in the vehicle for over 80% of
the time (my otherhalf will be with me only for 1 month). So there will
be times that I will have to leave the vehicle un attended.
I've searched through Horizons Unlimited and a main battery isolator
switch was recommended several times...
Any thoughts or experiences appreciated.
Thanks
Niall
HDJ80
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Niall,
During my trips - where I NEVER had a problem - I have found it usefull to
hide a spare vehicle key somewhere where it is accessible to you but not
obvious to anybody else. In case your key is stolen (or lost), and you are
the first back to your vehicle, at least you can drive away. So anywhere
under the vehicle is OK, obviously packed watertight and very securely
attached.
I highly recommend not to take a gun. You will get through borders where
your vehicle will be searched thoroughly : if found, you're in serious
trouble. And in places where you will be searched thoroughly, they know
where to search.
Nobody steels wheels anymore : if anything is stolen, it is usually the
whole vehicle, not just the wheels or something from under the engine bay.
Generally, the security "problem" is overrated, the best thing to do is to
let them walk away with your vehicle and cash in on the insurance. Lockton,
in the UK, provides a good insurance cover at a reasonable price.
What will be your route ?
Cedric
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Somers Niall
Sent: mercredi 19 septembre 2007 10:27
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: [ELCO] Overland Vehicle Security
Alright Lads
Would be interested on any experiences re vehicle security while
overlanding. Any problems encountered and possible prevention measures?
Have sourced some tidy door mounted hasp locks for the 4 doors + one on
the fuel filler from http://www.overlandhardware.com/protect.html one
key fits all job
Also plan on fitting an alarm and steering lock.
Rear side windows will be secured internally with some light weight
aluminium sheeting I can get from a mates printing workshop.
Going to put an old gun safe in the Back and keep it accessible from the
front for ease of storage of bulky valuables when vacating the vehicle.
Another safe will be put somewhere else for passports and other very
valuable documents/cash etc - possibly bolted into the passenger side
footwell?
A third hidee hole might be a good idea for emergency cash also - any
good ideas for locating this
Other possible weak points that I haven't addressed yet are:
- The tail gate window.
- Driver and passenger door window glass
- The sun roof
- Engine Bay
- Wheels
- ???? Anything else?
I plan on teaming up with other overlanders reroute for security and
craic but will be travelling on my own in the vehicle for over 80% of
the time (my otherhalf will be with me only for 1 month). So there will
be times that I will have to leave the vehicle un attended.
I've searched through Horizons Unlimited and a main battery isolator
switch was recommended several times...
Any thoughts or experiences appreciated.
Thanks
Niall
HDJ80
 
G

Guest

Guest
Cedric
Re > Spare key
Good idea - hadn't thought of that!
RE > I highly recommend not to take a gun.
Agreed - My shotgun would be no match for an AK47 anyway!
RE > Generally, the security "problem" is overrated,
Mabey so, but you've been living in Africa for quite a while. Sometimes
familiarility breeds contempt? Where I'm coming from the biggest risk I
run regularly is getting a bad pint in a strange pub :)
Hopefully when I'm finished my trip I'll think the "problem" is
overrated also.
Re > the best thing to do is to let them walk away with your vehicle and
cash in on the insurance.
Agreed. Haven't tried Lockton but I know some outfits don't insure
vehicles in Africa that are over 10 years old.
Route:
Changing slightly all the time but:
Sudan (via either Tunisia and Libya Egypt or Syria, Jordan, Egypt),
Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique then not so sure but finishing in
Capetown or Namabia - the latter if I can ship the vehicle home there.
Cheers
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
At Lockton, get in touch with Ricky Downs at [Email address removed]
For a value of approx 30.000 Euro you will pay around 1.500 Euro for a
comprehensive insurance for mainland Africa.
Your most dangerous part of the route will be crossing Northern Kenya,
between Moyale and Nanyuki, a 285 km stretch. Did it last year, a few
pictures on http://cedricvandermeulen.spaces.live.com/, click on "photos"
and then on the ones of Ethiopia (and indeed with a Defender and a trailer).
Quite rough, with the added disadvantage of banditry although officially you
do not need to travel in convoy anymore. But you don't want to break down
there. I shattered the rear window on that stretch, and when I noticed I
continued for another 5 km without stopping, in case it was a bullet at
least I was not anymore in the vicinity of the gun !
I highly recommend to go to Cape Town through Namibia, which in my opinion
is the most beautiful country I've ever seen. You will have more (and
cheaper) shipping options out of Durban then Cape Town - but it's on the
other side of S-Africa again. Zimbabwe is still relatively safe despite its
problems, but things can change rapidly of course.
Cedric
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Somers Niall
Sent: mercredi 19 septembre 2007 11:06
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Overland Vehicle Security
Cedric
Re > Spare key
Good idea - hadn't thought of that!
RE > I highly recommend not to take a gun.
Agreed - My shotgun would be no match for an AK47 anyway!
RE > Generally, the security "problem" is overrated,
Mabey so, but you've been living in Africa for quite a while. Sometimes
familiarility breeds contempt? Where I'm coming from the biggest risk I
run regularly is getting a bad pint in a strange pub :)
Hopefully when I'm finished my trip I'll think the "problem" is
overrated also.
Re > the best thing to do is to let them walk away with your vehicle and
cash in on the insurance.
Agreed. Haven't tried Lockton but I know some outfits don't insure
vehicles in Africa that are over 10 years old.
Route:
Changing slightly all the time but:
Sudan (via either Tunisia and Libya Egypt or Syria, Jordan, Egypt),
Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique then not so sure but finishing in
Capetown or Namabia - the latter if I can ship the vehicle home there.
Cheers
Niall
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here
G

Guest

Guest
Cedric
Cheers for the contact at Lockton.
Re> most dangerous part of the route will be crossing Northern Kenya,
between Moyale and Nanyuki
Quick thinking there to drive on with the broken window. When you'cve
been out there for a while I'm sure the survival instinct kicks in.
"Green" travellers might not think that there was a potential
"problem".
Similarily if someone throws a rock at the windscreen - you might be
tempted to stop - but you're better driving on away from the situation.
It's a change of mindset you need.
As an experienced overlander in Africa - have you a general rule re if
you see someone broken down (that you haven't see elswhere on the road
previously)- drive on or stop? Is there a general rule of thumb .....
I ask because this is a common ambush technique.
My own thoughts are that I'd drive a safe distance past and stop to
assess the situation - possibly try make contact via CB radio before
doubling back - If I had doubt then put the pedal to the metal and send
help.
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
In Ethiopia you will notice that the kids will be throwing stones at you -
basically to every passing car. Nobody seems to bother or care, least of all
the parents. There is not much to be done about it other than blasting
through.
Whether I stop or not for somebody who (appears) to be broken down depends
on
* where you are : a busy road : don't stop - enough people passing by // a
road with sometimes traffic but not too much : don't stop - perfect for them
to do a hit-and-strike // in the middle of nowhere with a clear view in all
areas : I stop
* How do they look : is there a family around with women / kids : I stop.
Just 2 guys : I don't stop
* Background information : Heard of carjackings recently yes/no
Never hesitate to stop at a policeman and ask for directions / information :
they have a reputation of being a pain somewhere in the back/bottom, but
usually they speak either French of English, have the information and know
the area. And if you're asking this sort of information they'll be happy to
answer, because they'll feel useful - most of these guys choose to be a
policeman to do what you're asking them to do.
Cedric
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Somers Niall
Sent: mercredi 19 septembre 2007 12:10
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Overland Vehicle Security
Cedric
Cheers for the contact at Lockton.
Re> most dangerous part of the route will be crossing Northern Kenya,
between Moyale and Nanyuki
Quick thinking there to drive on with the broken window. When you'cve
been out there for a while I'm sure the survival instinct kicks in.
"Green" travellers might not think that there was a potential
"problem".
Similarily if someone throws a rock at the windscreen - you might be
tempted to stop - but you're better driving on away from the situation.
It's a change of mindset you need.
As an experienced overlander in Africa - have you a general rule re if
you see someone broken down (that you haven't see elswhere on the road
previously)- drive on or stop? Is there a general rule of thumb .....
I ask because this is a common ambush technique.
My own thoughts are that I'd drive a safe distance past and stop to
assess the situation - possibly try make contact via CB radio before
doubling back - If I had doubt then put the pedal to the metal and send
help.
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Cheers Cedric
Bit of info from the horses mouth there - the best kind
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Niall
The easiest way is to park your car for a while in Crawley or
Basildon. They will find all the weak points for you in no time :)
I am sure you will find that Africans are very decent and easygoing
people. Once you get in the right mindset, leaving behind you the
European preoccupation with privacy, time or individualistic
competitiveness, and accept that logic is not the only way of solving
problems, you are going to to stop worrying too much about the safety
of your possessions.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
 
G

Guest

Guest
Alright Roman
Re> I am sure you will find that Africans are very decent and easygoing
people.
As I found the Indian, Chinese, Nepalese, Thai etc etc.
Re > Once you get in the right mindset, leaving behind you the European
preoccupation with privacy, time or individualistic competitiveness,
and accept that logic is not the only way of solving problems, you are
going to to stop worrying too much about the safety of your possessions.
Well I'm packing my yoga matt and looking forward to finding Nirvana -
you haven't got the GPS co-ordinates by any chance? ;-)
Ohmmm
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Morning Niall,
Just to give my take on this:
1. Keep a copy of your main key AND remote fob in a secure and dry
place up under the chassis - also keep a spare battery for the remote -
mine went in Morocco - couldn't go anywhere - fortunately was in a town
opposite a shop that could sell me a battery.
2. Make sure you have a good alarm fitted that has internal movement
sensors that can be turned off when sleeping on the roof (rocking the
car, setting off the alarm in the middle of the night in the middle of
the desert - been there :). If you are fitting a new alarm, get one
what automatically locks the doors when you move off. Also make sure
the alarm provides an immobiliser function (see below).
3. Forget about the big padlocks on the doors, they will be a pain in
the arse to use. The Toyota door locks should be sufficient - I
suspect that most thefts will be a case of smashing windows and
grabbing what they can. If they want the vehicle the padlocks won't
stop them - again they can just smash the window, jump in and hotwire
the car.
4. Fit your own immobiliser or kill switch - you can wire a small
switch under the dash (or wherever) that either links to the Fuel Cut
Solenoid on the IP or if you have an auto to the switch that detects
the auto selector is in Park - there are others around, but these are
easy to link into.
5. An internal secure box is handy for papers and valuables, although
if sleeping away from the vehicle in a hotel, etc, you will probably
want/need to have passports, etc with you.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Morning Niall,
Just to give my take on this:
1. Keep a copy of your main key AND remote fob in a secure and dry
place up under the chassis - also keep a spare battery for the remote -
mine went in Morocco - couldn't go anywhere - fortunately was in a town
opposite a shop that could sell me a battery.
2. Make sure you have a good alarm fitted that has internal movement
sensors that can be turned off when sleeping on the roof (rocking the
car, setting off the alarm in the middle of the night in the middle of
the desert - been there :). If you are fitting a new alarm, get one
what automatically locks the doors when you move off. Also make sure
the alarm provides an immobiliser function (see below).
3. Forget about the big padlocks on the doors, they will be a pain in
the arse to use. The Toyota door locks should be sufficient - I
suspect that most thefts will be a case of smashing windows and
grabbing what they can. If they want the vehicle the padlocks won't
stop them - again they can just smash the window, jump in and hotwire
the car.
4. Fit your own immobiliser or kill switch - you can wire a small
switch under the dash (or wherever) that either links to the Fuel Cut
Solenoid on the IP or if you have an auto to the switch that detects
the auto selector is in Park - there are others around, but these are
easy to link into.
5. An internal secure box is handy for papers and valuables, although
if sleeping away from the vehicle in a hotel, etc, you will probably
want/need to have passports, etc with you.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Alright Julian
Thanks for the input there.
Re > Also make sure the alarm provides an immobiliser function (see
below).
Good idea but there is some divided opinions on Horizons Unlimited. If
the immobiliser goes wonky and you can't fix it you can be stranded. The
hidden switch is a must have.
Cheers
Niall
HDJ80
 
G

Guest

Guest
I disabled my immobiliser on our trip but have slightly changed my opinion
since. I think something really simple on the fuel cut solenoid may just be
a good idea. There does come a point though - if someone wants the car that
much then maybe they'll get through anything.
On 20/9/07 09:26, "Somers Niall" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
 
G

Guest

Guest
Niall,
I wouldn't be too worried about alarms, immobilisers, trackers and
other gizmos. They don't work at home and they don't work out there.
Who's going to ring 999 for you?
In large cities you''ll want to stay for the night in closed places
that normally have a watchman. During the day, paying a euro or so to
a guy who will look after your car also works better. Near villages,
seek the favours of the local headman.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On 9/20/07, Somers Niall <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Somers,
The big paranoia with immobilisers is if you have a fault and get stuck in
the middle of nowhere - similar to the problem that I had.....
My factory alarm went off in Morocco (I think some luggage/clothing had
shifted in the boot after I had removed some items under them in the boot)
and I couldn't turn it off with the remote so I had to dive under the
bonnet to disable the alarm with the key. However the immobiliser had
already activated and I couldn't start the car with the alarm turned off.
I am sure that with time on my hands I could have worked around the
immobiliser, there may even have been a sequence of key turns on the alarm
key to disable it, but fortunately I was in Ouzarzete opposite a shop
selling batteries for my remote key fob - I slotted in a new battery and
was able to turn the alarm back on and disable it with the key fob.
The key thing is that if you fit your own alarm you will know what the
imobiliser does and therefore can work around it if it goes faulty. If
you have a factory alarm it is worth finding out what it does to
immobilise the car so that if you are in the same situation you can deal
with it.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Somers,
The big paranoia with immobilisers is if you have a fault and get stuck in
the middle of nowhere - similar to the problem that I had.....
My factory alarm went off in Morocco (I think some luggage/clothing had
shifted in the boot after I had removed some items under them in the boot)
and I couldn't turn it off with the remote so I had to dive under the
bonnet to disable the alarm with the key. However the immobiliser had
already activated and I couldn't start the car with the alarm turned off.
I am sure that with time on my hands I could have worked around the
immobiliser, there may even have been a sequence of key turns on the alarm
key to disable it, but fortunately I was in Ouzarzete opposite a shop
selling batteries for my remote key fob - I slotted in a new battery and
was able to turn the alarm back on and disable it with the key fob.
The key thing is that if you fit your own alarm you will know what the
imobiliser does and therefore can work around it if it goes faulty. If
you have a factory alarm it is worth finding out what it does to
immobilise the car so that if you are in the same situation you can deal
with it.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
I believe the best security is mechanical, i.e. a Mul-T-Lock
The advantage is that it doesn't break down
The disadvantage is that it doesn't prevent intrusion into the vehicle, i.e.
the content of the vehicle can still be stolen - but not the vehicle. And
most of the time, in towns - where the thieves are - it is possible to hire
the services of a guard for a fraction of the cost of an immobilizer. If an
immobilizer costs 100 Euro, that is equal to 200 safe parking sites on a
trip.
Mul-T-Lock product detail available on
http://ecom.toyota-gib.com/Default.asp?WCI=ProductDetails&WCE=PID:1862047NTD
:0
I personally don't believe that anything electronic can withstand long rough
roads.
Cedric
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks