Recovery gear?

G

Guest

Guest
Hi all,
Just planning for a trip to Iceland in about a month, followed by who knows
where afterwards, thinking of maybe NZ or Oz .... Got a few questions about
recovery gear, grateful if anyone can comment:
What would be considered a "reasonable" list for recovery kit for traveling
on your own or with one other vehicle? I've got a winch on the front so need
strops/shackles/snatch block etc etc but don't want to buy/take more gear
than I'm likely to need. What length and load ratings?
Also, what is the consensus on sand ladders, waffles etc? Looking on other
forums people seem to think that waffles are more useful as they can be used
for bridging, whereas metal bends. However looking on supplier websites the
prices seem daft for what is really just a bit of GRP floor grating. I can
get used builders floor grating for "free" (if I turn up at night) but only
in 30mm thick and the stuff on 4x4 websites is 38 or 50mm.
I was thinking of getting a sheet the same size as my roof rack (about 2m x
1.5m), cutting it down the middle so each half would be about 75cm wide.
It would be easy to mount underneath the roof rack, would make a great table
top and I figure the extra width would make up for lack of thickness if I
need strength for bridging/mud/sand etc.
Did I miss something?
Cheers,
--
Andy Haxby
Den Haag NL and Macclesfield UK
HDJ81 getting heavier.
 
G

Guest

Guest
>
> Hi Jon,
> I had some 38mm waffles and I think they'd only be strong enough to
> support a loaded 80 across very small spans. The 50mm I have now flex a
> bit but do hold. Most times that I've needed the waffles has been to make
> a ramp out of a hole or deep rut in which case a wide waffle wouldn't fit
> in the hole. They do make a good table if you have some legs for them ;-)
> <http://www.mudtoys.com//images/stories/toys/waffletable.jpg>
Now that's a good point, I didn't think of that. Just goes to show that it's
always worth asking....
Now, where to buy 50mm waffles for a reasonable price......
> http://www.mudtoys.com//images/stories/toys/waffletable.jpg
Your drop down kitchen and laptop installation look good too......
> <http://www.mudtoys.com//images/stories/toys/waffletable.jpg> > What would
> be considered a "reasonable" list for recovery
> > kit for traveling on your own or with one other vehicle?
>
> I'd go for 2 snatch blocks and a 20 meter and 10 meter plasma extension
> rope if you can. You can rig some useful pulls and have a good reach
> without a lot of weight or bulk. A 5 meter and a 3 meter none stretch
> strap for bridles and holding the snatch blocks and a selection of
> shackles. I'd get a couple of 8.5 ton shackles for the snatch blocks and a
> few 4.75's for general use but make sure they'll fit through your recovery
> points.
OK,
> I'd also want to take my hand winch and
I'm figuring that if traveling on your own there are circumstances where you
might want to back out of something, and therefore recover backwards from
the rear of the vehicle. I am planning on modifying the Witter tow bar to
take a 2" receiver and was looking a getting a small winch stuck on one of
these
http://www.devon4x4.com/products_a/p824c205/multi-mount-winch-carrier.html
but am now thinking that might be OTT and a hand winch could be more
versatile. The only hand winches I've seen on supplir websites omit to
specify the load rating for the winch. Can you get hand winches powerful
enough for pulling a Landcruiser out of mud?
> ground anchor plus a sledge hammer
> for the anchor but most would probably say that is OTT :) I expect you'll
> have a spade anyway?
Got a spade, not planning on getting a ground anchor I was thinking that if
I need one it's an excuse to bury my girlfriend :)
> I don't carry a hi-lift type jack and use an air bag
> jack instead.
>
I'm not planning on a hi-lift jack, I don't see the point - they have to go
on the outside of the vehicle and consequently by the time you need them the
pawls are likely to be all jammed with grit. I was thinking of bottle jack,
trolley jack and a bit of plywood. Airbag jack could be an alternative
though, what's best, the ones that run off your compressor or are the
exhaust ones ok too?
Thanks for help,
--
Andy Haxby
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Andy,
take part in competitive events. If so, your rule number one, two and
three is to drive over obstacles only if it is absolutely necessary,
not because they are there.
As for an array of snatch blocks, shackles and winches, and not
planning on getting a ground anchor on your trip to Iceland - well,
the last time I checked there were hardly any trees in Iceland :)
If you are going on your own, your best mates will be a high lift
jack, a spade, and a big cup of tea. If going together with someone
else, also a long recovery strap - the longer the better, you can
always double it if it's too long. Good shackels are always handy.
Bottle jacks are OK for changing tyres but when you get hung up on the
chassis you need to lift the whole car with a high lift. It may be a
dangerous tool in unskilled hands but always worth the time spent on
learning how to use it. IMHO, in real life inflatable jacks are messy,
unstable and prone to damage.
As Jon says, remember to get properly rated recovery gear. And don't
buy cheap stuff - it's your insurance policy. I wouldn't take an
insurance cover from China because it's cheaper :)
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
--
European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Roman,
> >From your post I gather you are planning to go overland rather than
> take part in competitive events. If so, your rule number one, two and
> three is to drive over obstacles only if it is absolutely necessary,
> not because they are there.
Got that.
> As for an array of snatch blocks, shackles and winches, and not
> planning on getting a ground anchor on your trip to Iceland - well,
> the last time I checked there were hardly any trees in Iceland :)
I'm going to Iceland first, don't know where after that so just need the
"standard" kit whatever that is, for use both in Iceland and in the future.
> If you are going on your own, your best mates will be a high lift
> jack, a spade, and a big cup of tea. If going together with someone
> else, also a long recovery strap - the longer the better, you can
> always double it if it's too long. Good shackels are always handy.
In Iceland I'll be with another vehicle at least part of the time, after
that probably a lot on our own.
> Bottle jacks are OK for changing tyres but when you get hung up on the
> chassis you need to lift the whole car with a high lift. It may be a
> dangerous tool in unskilled hands but always worth the time spent on
> learning how to use it. IMHO, in real life inflatable jacks are messy,
> unstable and prone to damage.
Hmm maybe I should consider learning how to use a high-lift, I just feel
safer using a trolley jack and axle stands. BTW, do many people routinely
carry axle stands?
> As Jon says, remember to get properly rated recovery gear. And don't
> buy cheap stuff - it's your insurance policy. I wouldn't take an
> insurance cover from China because it's cheaper :)
Thinking of stopping at TBR when I next pass through Harwich. They sell ARB
and Warn stuff which should be as good as any right?
Thanks,
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Andy
As for me, the standard kit is what I keep in and on the landcruiser
because I am too lazy to repack it every time. It consists of a winch, two
shacles, a recovery strap, folding spade and an iphone. The last one
is exceptionally handy - you can always entertain yourself watching
recovery clips from youtube while your mate/partner does the digging
:)
Well, TBR sell quality stuff althoughty for some it may not be best
value for money. At the LR shows (there'll be two on the 17th July -
Billing and Newark) you can get a good selection of recovery stuff at
more realistic prices.
I forgot to mention two items always worth carrying - a good quality
air compressor and a tyre repair/replacement kit.
While trying to get unstuck, airing down the tyres always works
wonders (provided the chassis is well clear).
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
--
European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
 
G

Guest

Guest
>
>
> As for me, the standard kit is what I keep in and on the landcruiser
> because I am too lazy to repack it every time. It consists of a winch, two
> shacles, a recovery strap, folding spade and an iphone.
I've got storage drawers now so planning to just pack everything once then I
can never forget it.
> The last one
> is exceptionally handy - you can always entertain yourself watching
> recovery clips from youtube while your mate/partner does the digging
> :)
>
Hate to think what the roaming data charges will be in Iceland :)
Well, TBR sell quality stuff althoughty for some it may not be best
> value for money. At the LR shows (there'll be two on the 17th July -
> Billing and Newark) you can get a good selection of recovery stuff at
> more realistic prices.
Can't make them unfortunately, hoping TBR still do 10% ELCO discount.
> I forgot to mention two items always worth carrying - a good quality
> air compressor and a tyre repair/replacement kit.
Got them.
Thanks for help,
Cheers,
 
G

Guest

Guest
Overlanding and competition are two very different things.

For overlanding surely you want reliability and strength combined with versatility to get yourself out of any situation.

Personally i wouldn't go anywhere without a hi-lift- a proper 6ft jobbie made by hi-lift (abril). A Hi lif has many many many uses- it can be used to jack a vehicle up to change a tyre (but then so can a bottle jack)=2C it can be used to lift a tyre of a vehicle when you are totally bellied in sand/snow (which nothing else can) so that you can get a waffle board underneath=2C it can be used to "cast" a vehicle sideways- when you are stuck in very very very deep ruts with the diffs firmly in the mud and all 4 wheels turning in the air (not uncommon in parts of Europe=2C let alone Africa)=2C the most realistic way out is to jack the vehicle up and push it sideways on top of an unstable hi-lift. It can be used as a pure hand winch- yes it is slow=2C and you will need a special chain=2C but it will not stop working=2C and you can pull the vehicle from any direction=2C slowly and in a controlled manner. It can be used to stabilise a vehicle when using the front winch- ie on a dnagerous side slops it can act as a "centre" winch. It can be used to compress things to help effect repairs.

Firtsly get yourself some training. Being trained with the wrong kit will be far far far far more useful than being untrained with the right kit. Recovery frequently causes minor injuries=2C often causes serious injuries and infrequently kills people. Knowing how kit works will save your and more importantly other peoples lives=2C it will also reduce stress and improve your decision making skills.

The VERY first thing you need to make sure is make sure you are properly trained. The next thing is to make sure that you have safe and secure recovery points. Very few do. The recovery loops on the front bumper ARE proper recovery rings=2C BUT you should always use a bridle with rated shackles. if you have recovery points in custom bumpers the should be in at least 3mm plate steel with a 2mm spreader no smaller than 100mm x 200mm. This goes for Nator hitches as well. All bolts used should be hi tensile 8.8 or above.

You should have a pair of recovery points at both front and rear=2C and preferably on the sides as well- although very very strong rock sliders with nerf bars will do.

The recovery protacol (of which i am purely an enthusiastic amateur)=2C goes something like this.

GET SOME TRAINING=2C then

1. Read the ground 20ft in front of you and don't get stuck. Get out and walk if you don't know what you are crossing.
2. Set the car up for the ground ahead in terms of difflocks and low range.
3. When you get stuck=2C make sure you are properly stuck- ie can you reverse out. Only have 2 attempts at getting out when stuck (or even only 1)=2C to reduce the chances of red mist and subsequent drivetrain/vehicle damage.
4. MAKE A CUP OF TEA.
5. go back to point 4 again as you ignored it didn't you. Point 4 is absolutely crucial for a fast and safe recovery. It gives you a chance to ignore the annoyance/ embarrasment/ fear of getting stuck. when you are calm enough to think rationally proceed to point 6.
6. consider your aims- do you need to go forward or backwards- ie if there is a 100m mud run in front of you=2C then you want to go backwards and find another route. If you are stuck in temporary soft sand or deep snow then going forwards could be an option.
7. Check for likely points of damage that could hinder you in any recovery- look at forwards and backwards. Consider such things as vehicle stability=2C damage to underside (particularly low points such as diffs and on 80s transfer boxes)=2C occupant safey and potential damage to enviroment (will i roll my truck down a slope into someone's house=2C or will i trash this lovely tree)
8. Consider what kit to use in order to achiever your aim- my personal list in order of prefence for recovery-
a. Drive out
b. Recovery from other vehicle with NON Kerr rope
c. Mechanical recoevry- ie hi lift=2C air jack=2C digging yourself out etc etc
d. Winch
e. KERR. (this list really goes up in order of the stored energy involved with any recovery- i have seen three accidents which could have been fatal in regards a KERR- also a hi lift can be almost as dangerous=2C but once trained those dangers are reduced.
9. Effect a slow and controlled recovery=2C according to a pre determined plan=2C with one person controlling the whole recovery=2C in a slow and steady manner. Prepare to stop at any time.
9. If recovery has been long and eventful=2C go back to point 4. At any point the recovery starts to look dangerous=2C or is using a LOT of force then go back to point 4 and have a re-think.

considering the above=2C what do you really need? Apart from training (did i mention this already? :d )=2C well=2C a well maintained hi-lift (and a fixing kit=2C preferably a bag=2C a jack mat- home made is fine=2C and a chain and hook for hi lift use)=2C a rated bridle=2C large stamped rated shackles (at least 6 of)- one key for shackles=3Bnever do them up tight=2C do them up until they are tight and then uno half a turn (they tighten themselves up under load until you can't undo them!) =2C gloves=2C some rope (preferably synthetic plasma from a reputable supplier)=2C pair of gloves=2C a snatch block (useful even if you don't have a winch)=2C a wide tree strop (preferably 100mm wide and must be rated)=2C a spade (type will depend on destination- a long handled arrow tipped shovel is perfect in snd=2C but useless in mud and rocks) and finally a bag to keep all your kit clean.

If you use any of your kit at any point then make sure it is well cleaned and free of damage when you get home- fabrics (ie strops and ropes)=2C should not be left muddy=2C but dried and cleaned. They must NOT be pressure washed. Cleaning in a washing machine in a pillow with no soap is acceptable. All metals should be oiled. hi lift mechanisms should be free of dirt and oiled regularly.

Hi-lifts have 3 potential dangers-
1. Instability- they are made to be unstable at times so you can cast thm over. You must be aware of this- never use a hi lift alone to change a tyre- jack up the tyre and then place blocks under the axle and lower the vehicle onto the blocks.
2. danger when lowering down- if you get get the lever timing wrong=2C and it is sticky=2C it is possible to drop the vehicle without any warning.
3. the most dangerous- handle position- if you have weight on the hi lift=2C and you aren't applying pressure to the hi lift handle=2C then the HANDLE REMAINS IN THE UPRIGHT POSITION. no ifs=2C no buts=2C no exceptions. It is common enough to be scary that people leave the handle in the down position (even a little bit)=2C or even worse apply pressure to hold the handle in the down position- if you slip=2C or the vehicle slips=2C the handle will be shot up with 2tons of pressure behind it- if you are in the way=2C then you will have your jaw broken. For this reason you always stand to one side of the hi lift.

haven't mentioned winches as i don't beleive they are entirely necessary in an overaldning context. if you have one=2C make sure it works=2C you know how to use it and you have practiced its use. make sure you understand what snatch blocks do=2C why they make recovery safer and how they increase reliability and speed.

I also haven't mentioned ground points- ie anchors=2C trees=2C spades=2C buried tyres etc etc. if anyone has any interest in the musings on ground anchors then let me know! there are many many types of which a tree or another vehicle is best=2C but often unavailable.

sorry for the diatribe=2C i hope someone takes the time to read it! Its musings from a few years on Lantra training=2C a few years overlanding=2C and more years in winch challenges.



Date: Mon=2C 29 Jun 2009 14:24:42 +0200
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
From: [Email address removed]
To: [Email address removed]
Hi Roman=2C

>From your post I gather you are planning to go overland rather than
take part in competitive events. If so=2C your rule number one=2C two and
three is to drive over obstacles only if it is absolutely necessary=2C
not because they are there.
Got that.

As for an array of snatch blocks=2C shackles and winches=2C and not
planning on getting a ground anchor on your trip to Iceland - well=2C
the last time I checked there were hardly any trees in Iceland :)
I'm going to Iceland first=2C don't know where after that so just need the "standard" kit whatever that is=2C for use both in Iceland and in the future.

If you are going on your own=2C your best mates will be a high lift
jack=2C a spade=2C and a big cup of tea. If going together with someone
else=2C also a long recovery strap - the longer the better=2C you can
always double it if it's too long. Good shackels are always handy.
In Iceland I'll be with another vehicle at least part of the time=2C after that probably a lot on our own.

Bottle jacks are OK for changing tyres but when you get hung up on the
chassis you need to lift the whole car with a high lift. It may be a
dangerous tool in unskilled hands but always worth the time spent on
learning how to use it. IMHO=2C in real life inflatable jacks are messy=2C
unstable and prone to damage.
Hmm maybe I should consider learning how to use a high-lift=2C I just feel safer using a trolley jack and axle stands. BTW=2C do many people routinely carry axle stands?

As Jon says=2C remember to get properly rated recovery gear. And don't
buy cheap stuff - it's your insurance policy. I wouldn't take an
insurance cover from China because it's cheaper :)
Thinking of stopping at TBR when I next pass through Harwich. They sell ARB and Warn stuff which should be as good as any right?
Thanks=2C
_________________________________________________________________
MSN straight to your mobile - news=2C entertainment=2C videos and more.
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G

Guest

Guest
p.s. re-reading this- side recovery points are nice=2C but you don't need them. airing down tires can be critical in self recovery- but know your pressure points- eg never lower than 15psi for very short distances below 10mph with a set of BFG MTs (according to VDEG- but i often compete at 12psi and haven't pun a tyre or pushed a bead yet!).

Not putting weight on the roof is a very veyr good idea to help with vehicle stability. In the same vein=2C when stauck in sand/snow=2C unloading the vehicle of all weight can be a lifesaver- can easily stip off half a ton=2C which with lowered sand pressures usually means you can drive out of anything!

From: [Email address removed]
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
Date: Mon=2C 29 Jun 2009 14:44:40 +0100
Overlanding and competition are two very different things.

For overlanding surely you want reliability and strength combined with versatility to get yourself out of any situation.

Personally i wouldn't go anywhere without a hi-lift- a proper 6ft jobbie made by hi-lift (abril). A Hi lif has many many many uses- it can be used to jack a vehicle up to change a tyre (but then so can a bottle jack)=2C it can be used to lift a tyre of a vehicle when you are totally bellied in sand/snow (which nothing else can) so that you can get a waffle board underneath=2C it can be used to "cast" a vehicle sideways- when you are stuck in very very very deep ruts with the diffs firmly in the mud and all 4 wheels turning in the air (not uncommon in parts of Europe=2C let alone Africa)=2C the most realistic way out is to jack the vehicle up and push it sideways on top of an unstable hi-lift. It can be used as a pure hand winch- yes it is slow=2C and you will need a special chain=2C but it will not stop working=2C and you can pull the vehicle from any direction=2C slowly and in a controlled manner. It can be used to stabilise a vehicle when using the front winch- ie on a dnagerous side slops it can act as a "centre" winch. It can be used to compress things to help effect repairs.

Firtsly get yourself some training. Being trained with the wrong kit will be far far far far more useful than being untrained with the right kit. Recovery frequently causes minor injuries=2C often causes serious injuries and infrequently kills people. Knowing how kit works will save your and more importantly other peoples lives=2C it will also reduce stress and improve your decision making skills.

The VERY first thing you need to make sure is make sure you are properly trained. The next thing is to make sure that you have safe and secure recovery points. Very few do. The recovery loops on the front bumper ARE proper recovery rings=2C BUT you should always use a bridle with rated shackles. if you have recovery points in custom bumpers the should be in at least 3mm plate steel with a 2mm spreader no smaller than 100mm x 200mm. This goes for Nator hitches as well. All bolts used should be hi tensile 8.8 or above.

You should have a pair of recovery points at both front and rear=2C and preferably on the sides as well- although very very strong rock sliders with nerf bars will do.

The recovery protacol (of which i am purely an enthusiastic amateur)=2C goes something like this.

GET SOME TRAINING=2C then

1. Read the ground 20ft in front of you and don't get stuck. Get out and walk if you don't know what you are crossing.
2. Set the car up for the ground ahead in terms of difflocks and low range.
3. When you get stuck=2C make sure you are properly stuck- ie can you reverse out. Only have 2 attempts at getting out when stuck (or even only 1)=2C to reduce the chances of red mist and subsequent drivetrain/vehicle damage.
4. MAKE A CUP OF TEA.
5. go back to point 4 again as you ignored it didn't you. Point 4 is absolutely crucial for a fast and safe recovery. It gives you a chance to ignore the annoyance/ embarrasment/ fear of getting stuck. when you are calm enough to think rationally proceed to point 6.
6. consider your aims- do you need to go forward or backwards- ie if there is a 100m mud run in front of you=2C then you want to go backwards and find another route. If you are stuck in temporary soft sand or deep snow then going forwards could be an option.
7. Check for likely points of damage that could hinder you in any recovery- look at forwards and backwards. Consider such things as vehicle stability=2C damage to underside (particularly low points such as diffs and on 80s transfer boxes)=2C occupant safey and potential damage to enviroment (will i roll my truck down a slope into someone's house=2C or will i trash this lovely tree)
8. Consider what kit to use in order to achiever your aim- my personal list in order of prefence for recovery-
a. Drive out
b. Recovery from other vehicle with NON Kerr rope
c. Mechanical recoevry- ie hi lift=2C air jack=2C digging yourself out etc etc
d. Winch
e. KERR. (this list really goes up in order of the stored energy involved with any recovery- i have seen three accidents which could have been fatal in regards a KERR- also a hi lift can be almost as dangerous=2C but once trained those dangers are reduced.
9. Effect a slow and controlled recovery=2C according to a pre determined plan=2C with one person controlling the whole recovery=2C in a slow and steady manner. Prepare to stop at any time.
9. If recovery has been long and eventful=2C go back to point 4. At any point the recovery starts to look dangerous=2C or is using a LOT of force then go back to point 4 and have a re-think.

considering the above=2C what do you really need? Apart from training (did i mention this already? :d )=2C well=2C a well maintained hi-lift (and a fixing kit=2C preferably a bag=2C a jack mat- home made is fine=2C and a chain and hook for hi lift use)=2C a rated bridle=2C large stamped rated shackles (at least 6 of)- one key for shackles=3Bnever do them up tight=2C do them up until they are tight and then uno half a turn (they tighten themselves up under load until you can't undo them!) =2C gloves=2C some rope (preferably synthetic plasma from a reputable supplier)=2C pair of gloves=2C a snatch block (useful even if you don't have a winch)=2C a wide tree strop (preferably 100mm wide and must be rated)=2C a spade (type will depend on destination- a long handled arrow tipped shovel is perfect in snd=2C but useless in mud and rocks) and finally a bag to keep all your kit clean.

If you use any of your kit at any point then make sure it is well cleaned and free of damage when you get home- fabrics (ie strops and ropes)=2C should not be left muddy=2C but dried and cleaned. They must NOT be pressure washed. Cleaning in a washing machine in a pillow with no soap is acceptable. All metals should be oiled. hi lift mechanisms should be free of dirt and oiled regularly.

Hi-lifts have 3 potential dangers-
1. Instability- they are made to be unstable at times so you can cast thm over. You must be aware of this- never use a hi lift alone to change a tyre- jack up the tyre and then place blocks under the axle and lower the vehicle onto the blocks.
2. danger when lowering down- if you get get the lever timing wrong=2C and it is sticky=2C it is possible to drop the vehicle without any warning.
3. the most dangerous- handle position- if you have weight on the hi lift=2C and you aren't applying pressure to the hi lift handle=2C then the HANDLE REMAINS IN THE UPRIGHT POSITION. no ifs=2C no buts=2C no exceptions. It is common enough to be scary that people leave the handle in the down position (even a little bit)=2C or even worse apply pressure to hold the handle in the down position- if you slip=2C or the vehicle slips=2C the handle will be shot up with 2tons of pressure behind it- if you are in the way=2C then you will have your jaw broken. For this reason you always stand to one side of the hi lift.

haven't mentioned winches as i don't beleive they are entirely necessary in an overaldning context. if you have one=2C make sure it works=2C you know how to use it and you have practiced its use. make sure you understand what snatch blocks do=2C why they make recovery safer and how they increase reliability and speed.

I also haven't mentioned ground points- ie anchors=2C trees=2C spades=2C buried tyres etc etc. if anyone has any interest in the musings on ground anchors then let me know! there are many many types of which a tree or another vehicle is best=2C but often unavailable.

sorry for the diatribe=2C i hope someone takes the time to read it! Its musings from a few years on Lantra training=2C a few years overlanding=2C and more years in winch challenges.



Date: Mon=2C 29 Jun 2009 14:24:42 +0200
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
From: [Email address removed]
To: [Email address removed]
Hi Roman=2C

>From your post I gather you are planning to go overland rather than
take part in competitive events. If so=2C your rule number one=2C two and
three is to drive over obstacles only if it is absolutely necessary=2C
not because they are there.
Got that.

As for an array of snatch blocks=2C shackles and winches=2C and not
planning on getting a ground anchor on your trip to Iceland - well=2C
the last time I checked there were hardly any trees in Iceland :)
I'm going to Iceland first=2C don't know where after that so just need the "standard" kit whatever that is=2C for use both in Iceland and in the future.

If you are going on your own=2C your best mates will be a high lift
jack=2C a spade=2C and a big cup of tea. If going together with someone
else=2C also a long recovery strap - the longer the better=2C you can
always double it if it's too long. Good shackels are always handy.
In Iceland I'll be with another vehicle at least part of the time=2C after that probably a lot on our own.

Bottle jacks are OK for changing tyres but when you get hung up on the
chassis you need to lift the whole car with a high lift. It may be a
dangerous tool in unskilled hands but always worth the time spent on
learning how to use it. IMHO=2C in real life inflatable jacks are messy=2C
unstable and prone to damage.
Hmm maybe I should consider learning how to use a high-lift=2C I just feel safer using a trolley jack and axle stands. BTW=2C do many people routinely carry axle stands?

As Jon says=2C remember to get properly rated recovery gear. And don't
buy cheap stuff - it's your insurance policy. I wouldn't take an
insurance cover from China because it's cheaper :)
Thinking of stopping at TBR when I next pass through Harwich. They sell ARB and Warn stuff which should be as good as any right?
Thanks=2C
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Guest
Hi guys,
Winches, ropes, ground anchors, snatch blocks. KERRs - they are all
for the wimps!
For a successful recovery you only need two strong ladies, and a bit
of help from the assisting gentlemen.
http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/AndyWhite28/GilfKebir2008Vol3#5317987140540241026
And to be fair to our wives, there was about 400 litres of fuel on the
roofrack :)
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On Mon, Jun 29, 2009 at 3:08 PM, Jon Wildsmith<[Email address removed]> wrote:
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Roman
Pah..!
I'd like to get blokes to help ME dig out the beast from time to
time...blokes are strangely absent when a beast needs digging
out...disappearing [invisible] man syndrome - in their lazy as hell!
Regards
Renate
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Roman
Sent: 29 June 2009 16:52
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
Hi guys,
Winches, ropes, ground anchors, snatch blocks. KERRs - they are all for the
wimps!
For a successful recovery you only need two strong ladies, and a bit of help
from the assisting gentlemen.
http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/AndyWhite28/GilfKebir2008Vol3#5317987140540241
026
And to be fair to our wives, there was about 400 litres of fuel on the
roofrack :)
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On Mon, Jun 29, 2009 at 3:08 PM, Jon Wildsmith<[Email address removed]> wrote:
do...
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http://www.landcruisers.info/
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Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
 
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Ooh! Renate, how very dare you.
TTFN
Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rainbow Dreamer" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Monday, June 29, 2009 8:14 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
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Thanks to all for comprehensive and interesting replies. Any idea
where I can get some good recovery training, for both me and Julie my
girlfriend?
Thanks,
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Guest
http://www.4x4adventures.co.uk/_main/contact_us.htm

will admit personal connection- james is a very good friend=2C but i trust his judgement and traingin implicitly. he has run off road events for years=2C has hundreds of hours competing off road=2C is LANTRA and BORDA qualified and is also a senior off road instructor with Land Rover Experience. Not only that=2C but he also has done many overland journeys throughout the world both privately and with the armed forces. He is an excellent instuctor and tutor=2C so much so that I bought my other half a day out with him=2C and she's now more confident driving side slopes than i am :(

He can give tution in either his own off road prepped challenge truck=2C or your own vehicle- he is familiar with 80 series cruisers as he has to put up with my driving on any number of occasions lol

Even if i didn't know and like him personally=2C his glowing references from other people who I've talked to=2C say a lot about his effectiveness. He also has a access to a large number of varied sites which allow "free" training- that is training away from fixed and built tracks- ie palces that make you think for yourself.

HTH

Jim Pugh

> Date: Tue=2C 30 Jun 2009 13:05:12 +0200
> Subject: Re: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
> From: [Email address removed]
> To: [Email address removed]
>
> Thanks to all for comprehensive and interesting replies. Any idea
> where I can get some good recovery training=2C for both me and Julie my
> girlfriend?
>
> Thanks=2C
> --
> European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
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Chas
Well I was only responding to an email by Roman...he started it!...
Renate
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Chas
Sent: 29 June 2009 20:23
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
Ooh! Renate, how very dare you.
TTFN
Chas
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rainbow Dreamer" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Monday, June 29, 2009 8:14 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Recovery gear?
--
European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
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