This weekend

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I have just taken the rear n/s wheel off.
It looks as though the calliper is seized; the disc is completely destroyed,
metal filings everywhere!
So unless someone can get my callipers rebuilt and new rear discs, pads and
shoes fitted by Friday I'm not going to be at the meet. :-(
Pete
 
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What is a n/s wheel please?
2008/4/16, Peter Browning <[Email address removed]>:
 
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| What is a n/s wheel please?
"n/s" =3D "Near Side", meaning the side nearer the edge of the road or the
left in the UK and the right in La Belle France.
CB
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Why not do you say just "left or right"???
2008/4/17, Peter Browning <[Email address removed]>:
 
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Benoit,
Because for us on this side of the ditch what's left for you is not
right for us :)
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On Fri, Apr 18, 2008 at 4:58 PM, Benoit Bernard
<[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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Oh now the guy that is just silly! We both have left and right hands,
non? I have been at England two times, you can not fool me! :)
2008/4/18, Roman <[Email address removed]>:
 
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Benoit
Yes, but English people have the left and right sides of their brains
swapped relative to French people - have you not noticed this? It
explains many things ...
Seriously I have no idea why we say "near side", we just do. And to make
it worse the other side is called the "off side".
Sorry: maybe it is part of some infernal plot to confuse non-native
English speakers.
Christopher Bell
| -----Original Message-----
| From: [Email address removed]
[mailto:[Email address removed]]
| On Behalf Of Benoit Bernard
| Sent: 18 April 2008 16:22
| To: [Email address removed]
| Subject: Re: [ELCO] This weekend
|
| Oh now the guy that is just silly! We both have left and right hands,
| non? I have been at England two times, you can not fool me! :)
|
| 2008/4/18, Roman <[Email address removed]>:
| > Benoit,
| >
| > Because for us on this side of the ditch what's left for you is not
| > right for us :)
| >
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Hi,
The near side of the vehicle is a reference to the road side that
is closest, so the near side is the left and the off side (away, or
far side would sound better) is the right. This terminology comes from
the early days of motoring in the UK.
Regards,
Clive Marks
Home: +44 1293 514600
Mobile: +44 7821 491897
Crawley, West Sussex, UK.
 
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I quote:
"Left side and right side. "Near wheel" means that to the coachman's left
hand; and "near horse" (in a pair) means that to the left hand of the
driver. In a four-in-hand the two horses on the left side of the coachman
are the near wheeler and the near leader. Those on the right hand side of
the coachman are "off horses." This, which seems an anomaly, arose when the
driver walked beside his team. The teamster always walks with his right arm
nearest the horse, and therefore, in a pair of horses, the horse on the left
side is nearer than the one on his right."
Pete
 
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But the meaning of left or right depends on which way you are looking at the
vehicle.
Saying nearside or offside leaves no doubt ;-)
Pete
 
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yes..it does...more confused I've never been....
Lubo
----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter Browning" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2008 8:20 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] This weekend
 
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Pete

Ever read the "Modern Hiawatha?" See http://www.rickwalton.com/folktale/wells182.htm

CB
________________________________
From: [Email address removed] on behalf of Peter Browning
Sent: Fri 18/04/2008 19:20
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] This weekend
But the meaning of left or right depends on which way you are looking at the
vehicle.
Saying nearside or offside leaves no doubt ;-)
Pete
____________________________________________________________
Electronic mail messages entering and leaving Arup business
systems are scanned for acceptability of content and viruses
 
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For me LHS / RHS on an engine is looking down the engine from flywheel to
pulley. Doesn't work with transverse but they are perverse anyway.
Malcolm
Stafford (UK)
FJ45 '75 & FJ45 '76
But the meaning of left or right depends on which way you are looking at the
vehicle.
No virus found in this outgoing message.
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17:24
 
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For people closer to the sea, and boats, it's natural to use starboard and
port.
That really leaves no doubt.
Ugo
On Fri, 18 Apr 2008 20:20:12 +0200, Peter Browning
<[Email address removed]> wrote:
--
Ugo Hu, Oslo, Norway
HDJ100, Auto, AHC, 2001; ex HZJ80
 
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