torque

G

Guest

Guest
Hi guys
I would like to know if anyone knows at what rpm does the 80 series obtain
maximum torque. Would it be different from engine to engine even in the 80
series.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi John
AFAIK
1HD-T cruisers
165 HP @3600
268 NM @2000
That means max torque is @ about 2000 rpm
Usually this standard values vary enormously from an un-tuned to a
tuned engine. A friend of mine was getting only about 125 HP before
tun up and about spec after tuning.
Regards
Joaquim
94 1HD-T Portugal
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Joaquim
Thanks for the info on that.
How do you measure the HP on an engine and what is NM.
cheers
john
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
John
| Thanks for the info on that.
| How do you measure the HP on an engine and what is NM.
To measure the horsepower, which is the rate of doing work, you put some
sort of instrumented load on it - usually a "dynamometer". This is
usually a (big) dynamo or alternator from which the electricity
generated gives a measure of power. Incidentally 1 horsepower is 33,000
foot pounds per minute, in other words a horse can raise 33,000 pounds
(about 15 tons) by one foot in a minute.
NM stands for Newton Metres. A Newton is the metric measurement of
forces (1 N =3D 1 kg.m/s2), and is roughly the force exerted downwards by
a 100 gram weight (at earth gravity). So a Newton Metre is the torque
(force x distance =3D torque) you would get from roughly a 100g weight on
the end of a metre long bar.
It's a bit illogical mixing Horsepower (imperial unit) with NM (metric
unit), but these are the units that people tend to be familiar with in
the context of engines. The metric unit of power is a Watt, usually
quoted in kiloWatts (kW) for engines. 1 HP is about 0.76 kW.
So why measure both torque and power? They are different: torque is a
measure of the force that the cylinders can exert, power is the rate at
which they are delivering this force.
I find the easiest way to visualise this difference is to think of a
steam locomotive that is on the verge of starting: the torque available
from the steam in the cylinders is huge, but the power is zero because
no actual work is being done until the wheels start to turn.
At the other end of the scale turbines have a superb power to weight
ratio because while their typical torque is low, they spin so fast that
they deliver a large amount of power.
Confused? I hope not, but don't worry if you are. I doubt one person in
ten could explain the difference between mass and weight, and one in a
hundred the difference between torque and power.
Christopher Bell
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi
Christopher explained this better than I could possibly do. I'll just
add someones quote:
"Horse power blows engines, torque wins races"
Regards
Joaquim
 
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