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Vehicle preparation

Jez 2013 LC5

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Hi all,
I'm hoping some of you legendary travellers here can give me some advice on what i might need in way of preparing my 2013 LC5 for a trip from the UK to Ukraine and back down to Morocco before returning.
If anyone can advise an outfit in the UK (preferably London) that can supply and fit refrigerator, wince, bars, drawer system etc and whatever else is recommended here i would be extremely grateful.
 

Michael Montgomery

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Hello and welcome,

If you have unlimited funds the list could be forever. lol

For best advice please specify your needs:-

E.g

How long you will be traveling?
how many of you traveling,?
Where and how you plan to sleep?
Will you be precipitating in heavy or light off-road trails?
How long before your trip?
 

Jez 2013 LC5

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lol fair point,
about 8 weeks i'd say
2 adults and maybe pick up a 3rd for part of the trip
we wont be sleeping in the car
light off-road trails
Thanks
 

SpinDrift

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I appreciate that this might not be the answer you were expecting,but really all you need to do is to service the vehicle, put a good set of all terrain tyres and you're pretty much set for a trip. If you are going to do some light off road trails, add a shovel, some recovery matts, recovery points and tow straps. Then throw in some camping equipment etc if needed.

A fridge is handy for cold drinks and fresh food but not what I would call essesntial - I've done many trips without one. Once you start looking at fridges, you would need to consider a split charge system, and there starts the slippery slope.

Also - I dont know your background - perhaps some off road training might be useful.

Dont get me wrong, the toys are fun, but not necessarily essential for a trip. Think about what you want to do to see what you really need.
 

Michael Montgomery

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lol fair point,
about 8 weeks i'd say
2 adults and maybe pick up a 3rd for part of the trip
we wont be sleeping in the car
light off-road trails
Thanks

Best keep things as simple as you can and work out your needs over time with experience. You'll work out things as you try things out and how you venture along with trips.
I wouldn't say you need a lot an agree with SpinDrift.
LC5 is more than capable in stock form for most Overlanding trails. Check your existing tires wear and replace perhaps for some A/T ones at most if they need replacing. Other than camping gear for the rear boot, you'll be more than good on your travels.

If you were planning a camping and sleeping out then things could change along with cost but certainly, exterior mods like extreme bull bar bumpers, lift kits, winches, etc are pretty extreme and not for your needs.
 
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Jez 2013 LC5

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Thanks, Do you know if i will need to adjust the suspension if i change to All terrain tyres (or is that only i change to one the monster tyres?
I have a very specific diet so a fridge is actually a necessity, frommy previous experience in morocco i definitely would like bars, winch, sand mats, whereas a drawer system and maybe roof awning are purely for comfort.

Thanks for the recommendation AndycruiserguyLomas I will def reach out to him.

Thanks guys
 

Chris

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Making sure the vehicle is sound is the absolute number one. Barrie Dunbar, who used to run regular trips as Waypoint Tours - now running Active4x4adventures has written a lengthy article in this month's 4x4 magazine about the perils of one hapless individual who ventured into Morocco without having a clue. Sadly they were driving a Landcruiser which let the side down a bit, but they nearly lost the back axle due to corrosion and pretty much ruined everyone's trip by the sound of it.

Some of us drive big heavily modified vehicles because we simply like doing that but them we also go to far harsher and more remote locations than Morocco where a lesser vehicle just wouldn't make it.

A well prepared 120 is going to be perfectly fine in Morocco; I've had a 120 and taken it very much off road. I would suggest ATs because they are less prone to cuts etc than the Dunflop Grantreks that are fitted and air down better without damage to the side walls. You shouldn't need to change the suspension at all. You don't really need bars or a winch either. I would suggest a better primary bash plate than the tin and plastic thing fitted at the factory. You'll want a compressor to air back up for the road. The fridge, you can run from the car but get it as cold as you can in the day on the engine then turn it off or down (well up really) during the night and as long as it's full of things like bottled water, it will stay cool and hardly pull any power at all. Buy a decent one like a Snomaster and it will come with a jacket and remote control. The battery on a 120 will cope with running the fridge when you stop for lunch or the night etc. Just make sure the plug doesn't get pulled out of the fag lighter socket in the boot. That's where the remote control comes in really handy. You can put it on the dash and see that it's connected to the power.

The more you do to it, the more solutions you will need to counter the effect of what you've just added. Keep it light simple but well organised. Check your vehicle over every day especially suspension bolts bushes and so on. Take some spares of critical bits too. There are plenty of good places to get things fixed. They know Landcruisers very well there and you don't need to be anyone special to get help from them.

Regardless of what you do, you'll be parked for about 30 seconds and someone will rock up in a Renault Twingo, probably with only 3 wheels on it. What's often missed is that you don't need a special vehicle at all to explore, do it in a Yaris if you like. But the problem is doing it again and again and again. It's fine the first time but that punishment takes its toll. Constant battering has a cumulative effect and before you know it bits will be failing and falling off. Our seemingly over prepared trucks have much stronger components that are designed to take it again and again without failing.

Looking forward to seeing your preparation
 

Jon_Tallis

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Jez
Spindrift, Mike M & Chris' advice is spot on. Take a really well prepped vehicle but modify it only where really necessary. Weight is your enemy. Weight accelerates wear on everything else. That winch might just end up stranding you somewhere with a broken front spring.....
Keep it simple, light and reliable.
Things I might be considering in addition to those mentioned above would be....
Changing alloy wheels for heavy duty steels - steels can be straightened if bent - alloys can't.
2nd spare wheel provided you can carry one without resorting to a steel bumper.
Long range tank......maybe......but that IS a lot of weight so only if really essential.

Some really excellent advice in this book. Vehicle-Dependent Expedition Guide 1St Edition by Sheppard, Tom: Fair Hardcover (1998) | Bookfinder-General - [Leaving Land Cruiser Club]
 
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