What's the point of a wheel carrier then?

Chris

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OK, as the title suggests, I'm interested in the point of rear carriers.

Wheels too big to go under - so how big is too big?
Space needed for gas tank - is that the only location?
Improve departure - really?
Carry two spares - planning on crossing continents?
Just because you can - what's it to you!!

I can see why you would under some circumstances but having looked at the Matt Savage 80, getting into the cargo space (a lot, as I do) would be (it was as it was held with a threaded T bar) immensely frustrating as I'd have to undo the carrier every time. It would drive me nuts. Some owners do seem to have them for the last of the above reasons. Are they a pain to live with? Can you get them that at least allow you to get into the glass part?

Chris
 

Rob

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i have been told that 285/75/16 is the biggest you can get underneath. on mine its just below the tow bar but ultimately the towbar needs removing for better departure angle. if you plan on removing the bumper then you will increase departure angle by relocating it.

you can get aux fuel tanks that fit above the spare wheel cross member, they are usually up to 80 litres, but these are impossible to find so you need a custom made alisport one which are only a couple hundred quid cheaper than the long ranger.
 

Rob

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oh yeah forgot to add, im mounting a rear wheel carrier cos i need 2 spares and want to avoid putting too much weight on the roof.
 

Paul_Humphreys

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Also if you have a lift then the chain holding the spare wheel under the LC is not long enough to get it off. Guess how I know!!

I have my spare inside now, but am building a carrier with the new bumper. I do not what to out a flat tyre back in side of the LC when it is covered in mud and other "stuff" :shock: .

Yes they do get in the way of getting in to the rear.

Paul
 
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Chris

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That's priceless. Yes, who would think of that! DOH! Chain not long enough. Not had a puncture in any of mine. Always had tyre sealant in them.
I presume that you could lengthen the chain though?

Chris
 

Paul_Humphreys

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Nothing a welder cannot fix!!

Another point is, as you WILL be using it off road, there is always a chance you could hole the tyre when it is under the LC and it will be flat when you come to need it. With it on the rear it is less likely and is easer to check!

Paul
 

adrianr

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Caught my underslung spare 2 times today coming down some interesting bits in Grizedale.

It they had been really sharp i would have run the risk of slicing the sidewall I guess.

Only 4th time i have caught it - suppose you could pull it off and chuck it in the back if you were playing in the rougher stuff.

I have a carrier from an import waiting to be fitted. will make it impossible for me to get in the back once I have parked up at home - have to back into my space which is near a wall.
 

Andrew Prince

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You could certainly fab some kind of cover but unless it covered the whole tyre, you would have crud building up in there. Not a real problem but messy when you want to fit the spare.

You can quite easily adjust the underbody carrier cross-member to carry the spare higher up into the body. As Rob mentioned, there's a ton of space between the floor and the spare cross member. You can simply space the bolts supporting the cross-member to lift it up for more clearance. Not sure what the limit is but the bolts would eventually be too short (ok, big deal, solution=longer bolts) and you run out of chain length as Paul mentioned. You could always support/jack the spare as the winch unwinds and unhitch the chain once you get some slack - a bit of a fiddle but it is do-able if the chain is too short to let the spare hit the ground.

Reasons for the swing-out carrier...
For me, I would hate to slice the spare when playing off-road. Current solution, sling the spare in the boot. But if you were doing a longer trip or your boot was full of a packing system etc, then the SOC would be essential.
Ideally I would like a SOC that was removable so that I could stow the spare where I wanted as I wished. I.e. when bumbling around town etc, the SOC is a hassle for easy boot access in limited spaces, so having the spare underneath is great. If I want to play off-road and need the boot space, then spare goes on the SOC. If I was doing a long trip/overland, then I could carry 2 spares easily enough, 1 under, 1 on SOC.
A Long Ranger would mean no underslung spare. The ideal solution (for me) for extra fuel capacity would be to get an aux tank off a (petrol I think) Aus-spec GXL, some of which had the shallow profile tank (50l IIRC) that fits between the spare cross-member and the floor. But finding one in the UK could just be a little tricky :roll:

So that's my 2c for my situation :mrgreen: Obviously YMMV!

Cheers,
 

Andy

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I have one because
a; I have a 170 litre long range fuel tank under there
& b, want to carry two spares on desert trips without using the roof

yes it can be a nuisance having to swing the wheels out when getting (in my case frequently) into the back, but I'm prepared to put up with this!

Andy
 

Chris

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Hmm. Obviously I can see the point, other than where there isn't one of course, but I did think that there would be a bu**eration factor. I see that Gavlad had extended his so that the top section of the door is accessible.

Thanks Andy

If I make one, I shall have to call on you all for the 'goods and bads' of your relative carriers.

Chris
 

Jon Wildsmith

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I don't think it will take you long to see the point on your 80 when you get it Chris :) The long rear overhang means the spare does take a beating and does hamper progress and 35's just won't fit under there anyway. A 35 in the boot just takes up too much of the load space. I don't find it too much of a pain to be opening the carrier to get in the boot and even when someone is parked right up close as in B&Q car park yesterday the body mounted carrier can usually still be opened unless it's a high front vehicle behind. On a bumper mounted carrier maybe you could design in a pivot so the wheel can be tipped away from the tailgate enough to open the rear hatch.
 

Mark Whiteside

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I did have a swing down carrier on mine for a while but just found it impractical
so i refitted the swing out carrier and strengthen the pillar
 

Chris

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Thanks Guys. All helpful stuff. Ok, what about a curved rail that goes around the side so that the wheel slides around? It could have a break in the rail section that is bolted to the back door Yeah, I know, if it worked someone would have done it by now :cry:

C
 

Justin_Elliott

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I have one because of an underslung f' tank.

I would suggest keeping it low if you want access to the 'glass part' (mine clashes with the last inch or so! :x ) However, I had to tow a mates caravan a few weekends ago and the carrier prevented us from lifting the ball lock lever. So before you go too low you need to decide if or what you'll be towing.

If we start towing a lot more then I'd be modifying mine to prevent the need to disassemble everything just to hitch up.

I also believe the rear wheel carrier (which is lockable) adds another layer of security to your load area...

Wouldn't sliding the wheel around the side be about as frustrating as opening a swing out type?
 

Mark Whiteside

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Before i refitted my swing out carrier i did toy with having a lift up carrier with the upper tailgate but making up the assistance you would need and the mechanism you need was just to technical for me
 
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