Yaris-Sudden Death.

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Guest

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Stop worrying guys,
You are safe(ish) in your L/Cs. I've been whizzing round a lot on the
motorbike over the past few months - the joys of 45+ mpg and nifty
acceleration quite outweigh the simple fact that if anything motorised
hits me or if I impact a solid object - then I'm an organ donor and
don't ask which one!!
Gareth Jones '97 1-HDFT & '82 BMW R100RS
 
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Hi Guys
Ok it maybe that the small car has better crunple zones than the cruiser but
why is it then that the bigger the car the more the change you have or am I
wrong.
What is meant by the ladder chassis and is this a weak sesign or has it weak
points and if so why would it be used for such a heavy vehicle like the
cruiser.
Does anyone have a clip or ten of a cruiser after/during a crash be it
testing or on the roads in real life
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
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John
The NCAP tests crash the car into standard barriers, so a light-weight
car (ie small) with well-designed crumple zones comes off well because
it doesn't have to lose that much energy. (energy =3D half mass x speed
squared)
However hit a big solid Land-cruiser with a small car, and you want to
be in the LC!
A "ladder" chassis is, conceptually, two long rails running fore and
aft, with some cross-members (hence the "ladder" shape) and the body
bolted on top. It is very stiff longitudinally but, especially in older
vehicles, has a tendency to form a hinge round about the front
passengers' feet point and bend down. This rotates the dash and steering
wheel into the driver a bit.
Another problem is a straight 6 engine block, which can hit the dash and
move the whole dash & steering wheel assembly back into the front seat
passengers. V8 blocks, which are shorter, leave more space for
crumpling in the engine compartment.
The Ozzies have done an NCAP test on an early 90s vintage 80 series, and
it came out at 2 star rating. A similar test on a 100 series yielded 4
stars, but the latter had airbags. The summary results are on
http://www.aaa.asn.au/NCAP/ozindex.htm and there are some pictures
online somewhere, but I can't find them at present.
However the bottom line is that if you drive your 2 star Landcruiser
into a 5 star Yaris, you will walk away from the experience, and the
Yaris driver will not. Drive your LC into a solid concrete block and
you are less likely to survive the experience than a Yaris driver doing
the same thing at the same speed.
Concrete blocks are not commonly found in the middle of the road ...
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
|
| Hi Guys
| Ok it maybe that the small car has better crunple zones than
| the cruiser but why is it then that the bigger the car the
| more the change you have or am I wrong.
| What is meant by the ladder chassis and is this a weak sesign
| or has it weak points and if so why would it be used for such
| a heavy vehicle like the cruiser.
| Does anyone have a clip or ten of a cruiser after/during a
| crash be it testing or on the roads in real life cheers john
| 92HDJ 80 1HDT

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Hi Christopher
Thanks for that info .
I understand some of it but not all so can you explain please.
Why is it that when you see as we too often sad to say ,head on crashes that
the cars are mangeled but the occupants are also killed.
Now im not taking this as gospel but if the cruiser hits a car you say the
the cruiser driver will come off better, this I can understand.
But if the cruiser hits a solid object it will come off worse than the Yaris
hitting the same, this I dont understand.
I think it may have something to do with, in the first instance you have two
moving objects that can move either way and will in a head on and in the
second instance you have one moving object which has to obsorb all the
shock.
But maybe im wrong.
Correct me as you will.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
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Guest

Guest
John
A modern car is designed to crush in the bits where the occupants
aren't, ie engine compartment and boot (talking head on here). The
cockpit is designed to stay as rigid as possible so that inside bits (ie
steering wheel & dash) don't move backwards and hit the occupants. Also
if the cockpit is rigid you will be able to open the doors and get out.
If you wear a seat-belt that will do a pretty good job of restraining
your pelvis and torso, but your head will still whip forwards. If you
are a driver and you don't have an airbag it will probably hit the
steering wheel - which is "OUCH". Driver's side airbags are mainly to
protect against head and chest to steering wheel impact.
The goal of the car designer is to minimise the decelerations the
occupants feel (roughly to below 50g), and also to make sure that the
vehicle structure does not deform and injure them. This is achieved by
a host of safety features all working together:
- seatbelts, and seatbelt pre-tensioners on modern cars which tighten
the belt in an impact.
- airbags, mainly to prevent contact between occupants and structure.
- soft internal structure, with no sharp edges.
- crumple zones, tuned to deform where there aren't any people in a
reasonably controlled fashion.
The LC is a late 80s design which, for its day, was pretty good, but
technology and analytical tools have moved on by 25 years and have
improved crash performance.
So if the LC hits a solid object the absence of airbags, pre-tensioners
and well-designed crumple zones means that the occupants will get a very
solid jolt.
But if a Yaris (or any other vehicle designed in the last 10 years) hits
a solid object all these features will result in less of a jolt to the
occupants.
However if a LC hits a Yaris then size & weight dominate, and the Yaris
will be the crumple zone!
CB
|
| Hi Christopher
| Thanks for that info .
| I understand some of it but not all so can you explain please.
| Why is it that when you see as we too often sad to say ,head
| on crashes that the cars are mangeled but the occupants are
| also killed.
| Now im not taking this as gospel but if the cruiser hits a
| car you say the the cruiser driver will come off better, this
| I can understand.
| But if the cruiser hits a solid object it will come off worse
| than the Yaris hitting the same, this I dont understand.
| I think it may have something to do with, in the first
| instance you have two moving objects that can move either way
| and will in a head on and in the second instance you have one
| moving object which has to obsorb all the shock.
| But maybe im wrong.
| Correct me as you will.
| cheers
| john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
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Guest

Guest
Hi Gareth,
You are right about the joys of biking, but after two nasty accidents I
decided to stick to four very strong wheels and sell the bike.
TTFN
Chas
(All organs still intact)
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gareth Jones" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 5:47 PM
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Yaris-Sudden Death.
 
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