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Roof mounted Camping Lights - Wiring/Connection suggestions.

garygiles1963

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Dec 28, 2015
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Hi

Yes you can solder the connection, others here will know better than me, but I am under the impression a crimped connection is better electrical connection than solder.

G.
 

DH.120

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Some really good ideas here from all, and certainly quite a lot to think about.

Guys - really interested in the waterproof connectors [external link] as the panel mount could always be there and just a short cable from roof rack to panel mount connector; and can be capped off when not in use. If I was to use the 6 pin version that would allow for a +veg feed and return -veg for each set of lights too, and the wireless controller would be mounted inside the vehicle so less concerns about waterproofing it. Thinking I might be able to mount it on the roof somewhere near the 3rd brake light?


As for Anderson connectors: when I’ve used these before I’ve use the clamp the connector, fill with solder, heat with a blow torch, insert cable, and while hot carry on stuffing in solder until it flows out. Not had one fail so far. In fact on my jump leads I ended cutting off one of the ends and installed an Anderson and had an Anderson available at the back of the vehicle - never failed (but you do need whoppingly thick cables!). That was on my old Landy, but still have the jump cables and will be adding an Anderson on the truck soon.
 

Tractionman

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Crimp may well be a favoured option, if you have one or have enough jobs to warrant cost, like you, have not had solder on fail. As long as components clean and appropriate flux used, gives a strong joint.
Hella are another make with plug and panel mount sockets for outside use.
 

Mick W

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Hi

Yes you can solder the connection, others here will know better than me, but I am under the impression a crimped connection is better electrical connection than solder.

G.
From an electrical conductive point of view solder is better than a mechanical joint and less likely to break through corrosion/moisture, just cover it with a good heatshrink.
 

Tractionman

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Agreed, and good heatshrink is a nice backup for weatherproofing, although the boots are a nice tight fit anyway ( as long as you dont cut the holes in the tails too big)
 
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guyc

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The solder vs crimp seems to be often debated. I can see from an electrical perspective that a soldered joint is better than a crimped joint. The only negative (no pun intended) I've heard is that the solder creates a hard point particularly where it wicks up the wire and this can cause the wire to fatigue and break.

Just for info, heat shrink comes in two flavours - normal and adhesive lined. The latter is better. I also tend to use adhesive lined heat shrink terminals.

Looking at the spec's, the connectors are rated to 12A which would give you 144W with a 12V system. If you are going LED, then the six pin will probably work as LED's are very low current consumption but if you are using incandescent, you might need to have more than one connector.
 

Tractionman

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Agreed, with good heat shrink, that 'hard point' you mention, gives a stiffer, more flexible area there. A bit like the rubber strain relief bit that comes out of power tools for instance.
 

Rosy

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Late to the party but @StarCruiser did something similar by adding an Anderson socket to the upper tailgate recess. I'll see if I can find the thread but I though it was a clever way of getting power to the roof as the hole is in a relatively sheltered spot and the patch lead mesns it's not permenantly connected to the the roof rack.
 

Richard Turner

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Bulkhead terminals through the roof, you could bolt your cables to them as your connection/disconnection point?
 

StarCruiser

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Late to the party but @StarCruiser did something similar by adding an Anderson socket to the upper tailgate recess. I'll see if I can find the thread but I though it was a clever way of getting power to the roof as the hole is in a relatively sheltered spot and the patch lead mesns it's not permenantly connected to the the roof rack.
Thanks Rosy.
Here. My Cruiser - [Leaving Land Cruiser Club]
 

MarkW

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You can just run the cable up underneath the edge trim either side of the windscreen and onto the roof rack. A CB aerial cable will fit so plenty big enough to run cables for lighting
 
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