1990 4.2 1HDT Turbo Upgrade

BenjiCarlos

New Member
I am in uk
Oct 19, 2015
32
0
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
Hey guys,

My turbo is a bit "moist" and it appears to be leaking oil down onto the diff casing underneath. It smokes a bit whilst driving as well so I assume it is goosed. Its only done 88000 miles but I guess I best get it sorted. I was looking to get an uprated turbo whilst it is out, nothing major but just a bit better. Just looking for advice on where I could get one on an exchange basis and at what price roughly? I'm up in Inverness if anyone knows someone local?

Thanks again!
 

StarCruiser

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Guru
I am in uk
Oct 7, 2014
11,805
4,811
113
Bognor Regis UK
Garage
Mines been like that for years. Cured it by cleaning up the flexi pipe of the top of the turbo and the pipes it goes on and putting a smear of RTV sealant around both joints. It's just where the pressure blows breather oil past the pressure of the clamps if it's what I'm thinking. What colour smoke?
 

Shayne

Well-Known Member
Guru
Feb 2, 2013
13,508
5,155
113
South Wales UK
I just replaced the turbo on my 90 series for similar reasons and only found out while doing it that my EGR was still active :doh:I didn't need a new turbo . Clean the suspect area then clean your EGR and see how long it takes for the turbo to get dirty again .

My egr is blanked now so the new turbo is unlikely to get dirty .

A catchcan will be added at some point to ensure the only things going into my engine are fuel and air as was right and proper before bureatwats began to interfere .
 
Last edited:

BenjiCarlos

New Member
I am in uk
Oct 19, 2015
32
0
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
Mines been like that for years. Cured it by cleaning up the flexi pipe of the top of the turbo and the pipes it goes on and putting a smear of RTV sealant around both joints. It's just where the pressure blows breather oil past the pressure of the clamps if it's what I'm thinking. What colour smoke?
I kind of follow you there, I shall give it a little clean up and report back! It's like a whitey blue smoke, especially when I boot it!

I just replaced the turbo on my 90 series for similar reasons and only found out while doing it that my EGR was still active :eusa-doh:I didn't need a new turbo . Clean the suspect area then clean your EGR and see how long it takes for the turbo to get dirty again .

My egr is blanked now so the new turbo is unlikely to get dirty .

A catchcan will be added at some point to ensure the only things going into my engine are fuel and air as was right and proper before bureatwats began to interfere .
What is this mysterious EGR.. I am new to dirty derv's, What's the point in one if they can just be blanked?

Thanks fellas
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here

Shayne

Well-Known Member
Guru
Feb 2, 2013
13,508
5,155
113
South Wales UK
EGR = exhaust gas recirculation .
I don't know the 80 series so you may not have one . Basically it is a victory for tree huggers who decided it would save the planet if your engine can burn a portion of the same air twice making exhaust gas released into the atmosphere a little cleaner than it was before . It probably works great when cars are new or if the system is kept in A1 condition but as they age it does exactly the opposite of its intended purpose as it gets clogged up and dirty preventing fuel from burning efficiently and where does unburnt fuel go - out the exhaust .

Go to Halfords and get a can of Wynn's egr cleaner . Take the pipe off your airbox and spray it in there a little at a time ( too much your revs will go mental) use the full can and go for a 10 mile drive , if you can thrash it on a motorway all the better . I did this 3 times in 3 weeks when i bought swambo's cruiser because i can't blank the egr on her's D4D has too many sensors .
 
Last edited:

StarCruiser

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Guru
I am in uk
Oct 7, 2014
11,805
4,811
113
Bognor Regis UK
Garage
Yeah, I don't think you will have an EGR valve in '92. Whitish blue smoke is likely oil burning though where from is the question. Could be turbo, could be valve stem seals, you can always disconnect the air outlet from the breather and see if it improves and likewise the air from the turbo. If it still does it you've most probably got stem seals leaking I would guess though there are guys on here know far more than I do.
 
Last edited:

BenjiCarlos

New Member
I am in uk
Oct 19, 2015
32
0
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
Yeah, I don't think you will have an EGR valve in '92. Whitish blue smoke is likely oil burning though where from is the question. Could be turbo, could be valve stem seals, you can always disconnect the air outlet from the breather and see if it improves and likewise the air from the turbo. If it still does it you've most probably got stem seals leaking I would guess though there are guys on here know far more than I do.
Yeah I have done some research and I don't think I do have an EGR. My bets are the turbo seen as it is oily.. first place to start right? Air outlet from what breather? As for the turbo outlet, you suggest I just disconnect the pipe attaching to turbo pipe to the inlet manifold? will that not cause crap to get in as there will be no filter attached to it?
 

BenjiCarlos

New Member
I am in uk
Oct 19, 2015
32
0
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
EGR = exhaust gas recirculation .
I don't know the 80 series so you may not have one . Basically it is a victory for tree huggers who decided it would save the planet if your engine can burn a portion of the same air twice making exhaust gas released into the atmosphere a little cleaner than it was before . It probably works great when cars are new or if the system is kept in A1 condition but as they age it does exactly the opposite of its intended purpose as it gets clogged up and dirty preventing fuel from burning efficiently and where does unburnt fuel go - out the exhaust .

Go to Halfords and get a can of Wynn's egr cleaner . Take the pipe off your airbox and spray it in there a little at a time ( too much your revs will go mental) use the full can and go for a 10 mile drive , if you can thrash it on a motorway all the better . I did this 3 times in 3 weeks when i bought swambo's cruiser because i can't blank the egr on her's D4D has too many sensors .

:lol: Can this wonderful can of magic do me some good anyway even if it doesn't have an EGR?
 

StarCruiser

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Guru
I am in uk
Oct 7, 2014
11,805
4,811
113
Bognor Regis UK
Garage
Yeah I have done some research and I don't think I do have an EGR. My bets are the turbo seen as it is oily.. first place to start right? Air outlet from what breather? As for the turbo outlet, you suggest I just disconnect the pipe attaching to turbo pipe to the inlet manifold? will that not cause crap to get in as there will be no filter attached to it?
Absolutely BC, this is only for test purposes remember and only on the drive, in the garage, or whatever. You may find it easier to remove the cross engine pipe ('Turbo'). Just keep the area clear and don't allow anything to be sucked in.

The breather goes from the hump in the cam cover to the inlet pipe between the air filter box and the turbo inlet.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1447162754.114140.jpg

Top right to bottom left, so remove it bottom left where it goes into the big pipe. It will build pressure when you put your thumb over it for ten seconds or so and have oil mist in it. You can remove the pipe between the air box and turbo and see what oil there is in there. There will be some, enough to drip a few drops. You can inspect the inlet and outlet ports of the turbo then and see if there is much difference in oil either side.

I would be very surprised if your 80 has eaten it's turbo in 88,000 miles unless it's not been looked after.
 

BenjiCarlos

New Member
I am in uk
Oct 19, 2015
32
0
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
Absolutely BC, this is only for test purposes remember and only on the drive, in the garage, or whatever. You may find it easier to remove the cross engine pipe ('Turbo'). Just keep the area clear and don't allow anything to be sucked in.

The breather goes from the hump in the cam cover to the inlet pipe between the air filter box and the turbo inlet.

Top right to bottom left, so remove it bottom left where it goes into the big pipe. It will build pressure when you put your thumb over it for ten seconds or so and have oil mist in it. You can remove the pipe between the air box and turbo and see what oil there is in there. There will be some, enough to drip a few drops. You can inspect the inlet and outlet ports of the turbo then and see if there is much difference in oil either side.

I would be very surprised if your 80 has eaten it's turbo in 88,000 miles unless it's not been looked after.
Thanks so much, that clears up everything, I shall inspect them this week if the rain stops! What would you recommend I clean this bits up with and then seal with said sealant?
 

Dave 2000

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in spain
Mar 26, 2010
2,743
848
113
Sunny Spain
The rocker cover design inside is designed to separate mist from the crankcase 'blowby', there will always be a slight positive there and it brings the oil mist with it. It's designed to re-burn that oil mist and can often be seen in the exhaust smoke if the engine has been idling for while. Valve stem seals can show the same symptoms but this is more prevalent in petrol engines that have a strong vacuum caused by the throttle butterfly, something the 80 diesel does not have. With such a low mileage it would be unusual that either the turbo seals or the valve guides are worn, unless it has been severely mistreated.

I agree with Shane that the engine should only be burning air and fuel. if it is to be efficient, I would do as others have said and remove/seal up the pipes and consider the 'catch can' which TBH, should not be needed again with such a low indicated mileage. Something that I did not see mentioned (just flicked through) is dirty injectors, or injector timing, this too can cause the grey/blue smoke in fact, if the injectors are dirty/faulty or timing is wrong, then this can lead to excess fuel being left on the bore walls or, when the engine is off an injector could continue to drip diesel into the bore. The result is the diesel finds it's way into the sump and the oil becomes slowly diluted. When the engine gets hot, the now lighter oil mist particles find it easier to transit through to the air intake, this thin oil can find it's way past pipe connections where the clips have lost their tension, in the worse case scenario I have seen on an 80, is the main intake pipe has actually become porous.

I have found that engines (even in excellent condition) that get pootled around town for a few days a week tend to build some oil residue in the air intake or lying in the lowest area of the intercooler (not on your 80), a quick blast down the motorway clears this out. Remove the pipe from the rocker cover and place a cloth in front of it and rev the engine a few times, a gentle if any pressure will be felt, any more than that there you have an internal engine problem. The cloth should pick up just the minimum in oil 'specks'.

The turbo oil pressure feed to the turbo bearings is also kept sealed away from the intake/exhaust, thin oil can also pass into the hot exhaust passage and this too can cause smoke.

Just throwing this out there in one go so you have something to do over the weekend, can't have an 80 parked up with no one working on it. :icon-biggrin:


regards

Dave
 

BenjiCarlos

New Member
I am in uk
Oct 19, 2015
32
0
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
The rocker cover design inside is designed to separate mist from the crankcase 'blowby', there will always be a slight positive there and it brings the oil mist with it. It's designed to re-burn that oil mist and can often be seen in the exhaust smoke if the engine has been idling for while. Valve stem seals can show the same symptoms but this is more prevalent in petrol engines that have a strong vacuum caused by the throttle butterfly, something the 80 diesel does not have. With such a low mileage it would be unusual that either the turbo seals or the valve guides are worn, unless it has been severely mistreated.

I agree with Shane that the engine should only be burning air and fuel. if it is to be efficient, I would do as others have said and remove/seal up the pipes and consider the 'catch can' which TBH, should not be needed again with such a low indicated mileage. Something that I did not see mentioned (just flicked through) is dirty injectors, or injector timing, this too can cause the grey/blue smoke in fact, if the injectors are dirty/faulty or timing is wrong, then this can lead to excess fuel being left on the bore walls or, when the engine is off an injector could continue to drip diesel into the bore. The result is the diesel finds it's way into the sump and the oil becomes slowly diluted. When the engine gets hot, the now lighter oil mist particles find it easier to transit through to the air intake, this thin oil can find it's way past pipe connections where the clips have lost their tension, in the worse case scenario I have seen on an 80, is the main intake pipe has actually become porous.

I have found that engines (even in excellent condition) that get pootled around town for a few days a week tend to build some oil residue in the air intake or lying in the lowest area of the intercooler (not on your 80), a quick blast down the motorway clears this out. Remove the pipe from the rocker cover and place a cloth in front of it and rev the engine a few times, a gentle if any pressure will be felt, any more than that there you have an internal engine problem. The cloth should pick up just the minimum in oil 'specks'.

The turbo oil pressure feed to the turbo bearings is also kept sealed away from the intake/exhaust, thin oil can also pass into the hot exhaust passage and this too can cause smoke.

Just throwing this out there in one go so you have something to do over the weekend, can't have an 80 parked up with no one working on it. :icon-biggrin:


regards

Dave

:shock: Thanks Dave! I shall indeed get busy over the weekend! Will it be worth my while taking off all the components mentioned (Intake pipes etc) and cleaning them with brake cleaner and resealing? Judging by the rest of the car I'm sure it has been well looked after so I am hoping there is nothing too major wrong here.
 

Dave 2000

Well-Known Member
Supporter
I am in spain
Mar 26, 2010
2,743
848
113
Sunny Spain
When you stop whatever is causing the mist (assuming there is a problem), then no, the continual drawing of air will eventually pull the excess through and hopefully the smoke will stop.

Only if it had an intercooler would I pull it off and wash it out, the only reason for that is the oil can sit around for months.

regards

Dave
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks