[Body lift}

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Hi Guys
I know you are all saying not him again, well you know what they say its
hard to get rid of a bad thing and here I am.
Now that we have the brakes sorted and I did know what they looked like but
dident know that they were called vented. I have some of the info but its
only when its all put together does it make the jigsaw complete, thanks
guys. The other thing is that I can ask the questions without getting a kick
in the ars or a slap on the head from you guys untill we one day meet, O God
ill have to wear amour never mind amour for the cruiser, ill be put through
my paces running off road with a load of cruisers after me. Anyway here
goes.
It was always my understanding that the higher the vehicle is the higher its
center of gravity and so more unstable. Now if that is the case why rais the
cruiser and there by rais its center of gravity, which in theory should make
it more unstable than before. Fart cars are all very low to the ground and
corner well and cars with a higher center tend to wobble or swing out at the
rear. So could someone explain that to me please why we all want the
cruisers higher apart from the obvious reason more ground clearance and
easier to crawl under with the big belly etc. Another thing the weight of
the cruisers body lies on the springs YES and is held there by bolts, then
the shocks stop the force of the spring from going on and on andon and you
being bounced from here to well anywhere really and feeling quite like a
wobbly jelly. Ok so is that all that the weight of the body is on and when
you lift the body up more the only thing that changes is the distance from
the body to the axles am I right.. So what else has to be able to more that
distance of the lift, maybe the brake pipes or other things, does the engine
also move up because its attached to the body and how does that work with
the drive shafts that go into the engine, do they move up. You know what im
trying to say dont you. Its just I do not have any mechanical training at
all and at times its difficult to know how things work together in the over
all picture.
Pain in the ass
92HDJ 80 1HDT Ireland
 
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On 4/28/05, john byrne <[Email address removed]> wrote:
ut
ick
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John,
Oh, so many questions, so little time....
1) Landcruisers are not built for speed and cornering. Wheel travel
takes priority over stability.
1a) the weight of the body does not lie on the springs but on the
frame The frame lies on springs, but it's not held there by bolts. The
connections between the frame and the axle are there for lateral and
longtitudinal stability.
2) Lifting the body on the springs by a few inches requires extending:
brake lines & axle breather pipes.
3) The engine is not attached to the body but to the frame. The body
is also attached to the frame, so no change is required if longer
springs are used. Severe lifts will affect, however, the angles
between the propshafts and the axles, so double cardan, longer
propsahfts are needed.
4) If you also lift the bodywork on the frame, there are more things
that need extending, like the steering wheel shaft, etc.
PS. To discuss "Fart cars" please join alt.social.oldagemobility.com
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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Guest

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Hey Roman
I nearly got it right well nearly, nearly maybe nearly, well at least I
tried. So for the 2 inch lift I will need longer brake lines than what is
there at the moment. Do you know of somewhere to get them, is it for all
four wheels I need the longer brake lines. I know it may seem simple to you
Roman and some of the others but it is very important to me that I get
things right first time, even if only from the knowledge of others and not
from practical experience but I have to be certain about anything I do with
the cruiser. I will have to leave it in to a guy to do the springs and
shocks and I dont want any problems that he did not see would happen, happen
and then Im left with his word as to what to do or if by not replacing the
brake lines I could put my family in harms way. I like to have a good bit
of a laugh usually at my own expence but I respect your advice and the
others who know whats what rather than depending on a garage guy who
probably has never fitted 2 inch lift springs in his lift but more like than
not he only has worked on c--- now I dident even say the forbiden word..
You see what I mean dont you Its like I was TRYING to read about wheels
about the off set and the inset and the something else, I gave up because
sometimes too much info is too much info. Anyway thanks for the info again
guys.
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Ireland
----- Original Message -----
From: "Roman" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2005 3:57 PM
Subject: Re: [ELCO] [Body lift}
On 4/28/05, john byrne <[Email address removed]> wrote:
John,
Oh, so many questions, so little time....
1) Landcruisers are not built for speed and cornering. Wheel travel
takes priority over stability.
1a) the weight of the body does not lie on the springs but on the
frame The frame lies on springs, but it's not held there by bolts. The
connections between the frame and the axle are there for lateral and
longtitudinal stability.
2) Lifting the body on the springs by a few inches requires extending:
brake lines & axle breather pipes.
3) The engine is not attached to the body but to the frame. The body
is also attached to the frame, so no change is required if longer
springs are used. Severe lifts will affect, however, the angles
between the propshafts and the axles, so double cardan, longer
propsahfts are needed.
4) If you also lift the bodywork on the frame, there are more things
that need extending, like the steering wheel shaft, etc.
PS. To discuss "Fart cars" please join alt.social.oldagemobility.com
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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Guest

Guest
On 4/28/05, john byrne <[Email address removed]> wrote:
ou
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John,
I understand your frustration and appreciate your zest for learning
new things. But don't despair if things do not happen as quickly as
you'd wish. After all you've been on this list only for six months but
you've crammed quite a lot of info. Just accept the fact that while
some kids use toys merely to play with, some other prefer taking them
apart to see what's inside.
As for extending brake hoses, one way of doing it is taking two
standard length hoses and joining them together. You need one for each
axle. I've seen a website somewere with hoses and fittings sold
separately for making DYI hoses.
If the garage guy is a mechanic rather than a fitter, he will have no
problem understanding what the job involves. But I'd avoid garages
where I have to teach the guy how to do the job and still pay him for
doing it .
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Hey Roman
You are right I want your experience and others aswell of a lot of years
crammed into a few months how thick is that. I will put the brakes on
cramming in too much info, maybe. But thanks for your patience with all the
questions.
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT ireland
 
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Guest

Guest
John,
I was reading the LCOOL list a short while back and there is a
stock Toyota part for 4" longer brake lines. They are for another
vehicle but they fit fine. They are all the same length, front and
back.
 
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