bridging ladders

G

Guest

Guest
Hi people,
We are just looking to get some bridging ladders and wondered if other
LC 80 owners were using the 38mm or the 50mm stuff. I don't actually
plan to use them at all on our trip from the UK to Australia, as I
hope I won't get stuck in anything I need them for but you never
know... Basically we want to keep the weight down so I was looking at
the 38mm stuff, but then various sites quote various weights that are
suitable for the ladders.
Most say the the 38mm can take up to 2500kgs... which would be around
what our truck weighs in at i guess loaded. Does anyone know if this
is a weight amount for the total vehicle, or for the weight allowed on
the board at any one time, as I'm sure there is way less that 2500kgs
bearing down a board if your back wheels are safely on the ground...
Any advice?
Cheers,
Duncan.
--
European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
 
G

Guest

Guest
Duncan,
The kerb weight (braked) is 2220kg, which is the total weight of a
vehicle with standard equipment, a full tank of fuel, while not loaded
with either passengers or cargo. In practice, a LC with extra
equipment and fully loaded for the trip weights well over 3 tons.
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On Thu, Jul 2, 2009 at 12:40 PM, Duncan Atack<[Email address removed]> wrote:
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Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
 
G

Guest

Guest
Duncan
While I am saying its a heavy old bastard, I am not saying you should
get the 50mm ones. I would rather take somethig lighter, to be used
for recovery when you accidentally get stuck and need traction aid,
rather than for building a bridge over a ditch.
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On Thu, Jul 2, 2009 at 1:34 PM, Duncan Atack<[Email address removed]> wrote:
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G

Guest

Guest
the thin ones flex horrifically with a lot of weight on them- they don't tend to snap without a lot of provocation=2C but the more they flex=2C the more the splinter at the edges.

Of course the problem with the flexing is that you then end up driving up a very steep slope as the briding ladders flex under you. Personally i'd get the thicker ones.

> Date: Thu=2C 2 Jul 2009 13:34:16 +0100
> Subject: Re: [ELCO] bridging ladders
> From: [Email address removed]
> To: [Email address removed]
>
> So you are saying its a heavy old bastard and get the 50mm ones?
>
> 2009/7/2 Roman <[Email address removed]>
> >
> > Duncan=2C
> >
> > > 2500kgs... which would be around
> > > what our truck weighs in at i guess loaded.
> >
> > The kerb weight (braked) is 2220kg=2C which is the total weight of a
> > vehicle with standard equipment=2C a full tank of fuel=2C while not loaded
> > with either passengers or cargo. In practice=2C a LC with extra
> > equipment and fully loaded for the trip weights well over 3 tons.
> >
> > Rgds=2C
> > Roman (London=2C UK)
> > '92 HDJ80 (auto)
> >
> >
> >
> > On Thu=2C Jul 2=2C 2009 at 12:40 PM=2C Duncan Atack<[Email address removed]> wrote:
> > > Hi people=2C
> > >
> > > We are just looking to get some bridging ladders and wondered if other
> > > LC 80 owners were using the 38mm or the 50mm stuff. I don't actually
> > > plan to use them at all on our trip from the UK to Australia=2C as I
> > > hope I won't get stuck in anything I need them for but you never
> > > know... Basically we want to keep the weight down so I was looking at
> > > the 38mm stuff=2C but then various sites quote various weights that are
> > > suitable for the ladders.
> > >
> > > Most say the the 38mm can take up to 2500kgs... which would be around
> > > what our truck weighs in at i guess loaded. Does anyone know if this
> > > is a weight amount for the total vehicle=2C or for the weight allowed on
> > > the board at any one time=2C as I'm sure there is way less that 2500kgs
> > > bearing down a board if your back wheels are safely on the ground...
> > >
> > > Any advice?
> > >
> > > Cheers=2C
> > > Duncan.
> > > --
> > > European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> > > Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
> > >
> > --
> > European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> > Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
> --
> European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/k one
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G

Guest

Guest
I took the aluminium sand ladders on our recent trip from the UK to Australia and the two times I had to use them they were rubbish and were like butter albeit I was using them to try and get up a very steep kerb which I was side onto. I didnt take the heavy waffle boards as I thought they were too heavy but wished I had. They offer better traction as well than the metal sand ladders. The thing about the weight bearing of them in terms of bridging is that the figures quoted are for the full length of the board. The shorter the bridge (in terms of physics and the principle of levers the closer together the two fulcrums are) then the more weight it can take so the lighter ones should be fine where the gap isnt too big. And u can always created another fulcrum with a bottle jack and hi-lift jack (i'd take both) underneath to strength it. Agree though with the comment about bridging - would be surprised if u need to.
Regards
Graham Naismith
Mob. 07904 237471
----- Original Message -----
From: James Pugh
To: [Email address removed]
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 2:09 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] bridging ladders
the thin ones flex horrifically with a lot of weight on them- they don't tend to snap without a lot of provocation, but the more they flex, the more the splinter at the edges.

Of course the problem with the flexing is that you then end up driving up a very steep slope as the briding ladders flex under you. Personally i'd get the thicker ones.

> Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2009 13:34:16 +0100
> Subject: Re: [ELCO] bridging ladders
> From: [Email address removed]
> To: [Email address removed]
>
> So you are saying its a heavy old bastard and get the 50mm ones?
>
> 2009/7/2 Roman <[Email address removed]>
> >
> > Duncan,
> >
> > > 2500kgs... which would be around
> > > what our truck weighs in at i guess loaded.
> >
> > The kerb weight (braked) is 2220kg, which is the total weight of a
> > vehicle with standard equipment, a full tank of fuel, while not loaded
> > with either passengers or cargo. In practice, a LC with extra
> > equipment and fully loaded for the trip weights well over 3 tons.
> >
> > Rgds,
> > Roman (London, UK)
> > '92 HDJ80 (auto)
> >
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Jul 2, 2009 at 12:40 PM, Duncan Atack<[Email address removed]> wrote:
> > > Hi people,
> > >
> > > We are just looking to get some bridging ladders and wondered if other
> > > LC 80 owners were using the 38mm or the 50mm stuff. I don't actually
> > > plan to use them at all on our trip from the UK to Australia, as I
> > > hope I won't get stuck in anything I need them for but you never
> > > know... Basically we want to keep the weight down so I was looking at
> > > the 38mm stuff, but then various sites quote various weights that are
> > > suitable for the ladders.
> > >
> > > Most say the the 38mm can take up to 2500kgs... which would be around
> > > what our truck weighs in at i guess loaded. Does anyone know if this
> > > is a weight amount for the total vehicle, or for the weight allowed on
> > > the board at any one time, as I'm sure there is way less that 2500kgs
> > > bearing down a board if your back wheels are safely on the ground...
> > >
> > > Any advice?
> > >
> > > Cheers,
> > > Duncan.
> > > --
> > > European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> > > Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
> > >
> > --
> > European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> > Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/
> --
> European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/k one
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