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Different Tire Sizes Front to Rear

rak48rak48

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Maybe not a specific 4wd question but it fits.

I own a 2001 Land Cruiser. OEM tires were Michelins, 275/70R16. Front and rear. Now these tires have been discontinued, plus they are expensive ($200+). My current set of tires are shot. My spare is new. My idea is to buy another Michelin 275/70R16 and put the spare and this new one on the front. Then I noted Michelin has a 265/75R16 of the same model as the fronts except the size difference. They are cheaper and the dimension difference is very small. I am looking for any and all advice from others regarding this consideration. Why do this? Cost! The OEM tires are very expensive. If I can lower my costs by using a less expensive Michelin on the rear with minimum effects then why not. These rears are just slightly taller. 4/10 of an inch. A little narrower, about the same. I rarely go 4 wheeling. So offloading is not an issue. Mostly highway miles. What do you think???
 

clivehorridge

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This is not intended to be a technical or legal response, but I don't think it would do much harm, if any.

But there are rules about odd dimensions on a vehicle, of course the same size should be fitted on the same 'axle' and from memory, the larger tread width tyres should go on the rear.

Check this out though, I may be wrong.

Ask Google...
 

rob rule

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you really have to specify which LC we are talking about...
different size tires on the same driven axle mean that the diff will be compensating all the time. Different tire sizes on a non-driven axle just means that one hub rotates slightly differently from the other.
Something has to give - the one tire will scuff (skid) a little
 

clivehorridge

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you really have to specify which LC we are talking about...
different size tires on the same driven axle mean that the diff will be compensating all the time. Different tire sizes on a non-driven axle just means that one hub rotates slightly differently from the other.
Something has to give - the one tire will scuff (skid) a little

I think I was clear on this too, maybe not. Each axle should have the same tyre size, exactly.
 

IRLGW

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I think this one has been beaten to death on different threads before but really so long as you are running open diffs it doesn't really matter. However newer cars with electronic stability and traction systems may have a problem with this because it may think a wheel(s) are loosing traction. I have done several thousand miles with 3x 285/75 and 1x 265/60 and nothing fell off!
 

clivehorridge

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I think this one has been beaten to death on different threads before but really so long as you are running open diffs it doesn't really matter. However newer cars with electronic stability and traction systems may have a problem with this because it may think a wheel(s) are loosing traction. I have done several thousand miles with 3x 285/75 and 1x 265/60 and nothing fell off!

That's what's so nice about 80s, they don't do a lot of "thinking" do they, they just get on with the job :lol:
 
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IRLGW

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Actually I was 'thinking' the same thing earlier while out under the truck. The Diff doesn't actually 'think' its doing anything - its just a few bits of metal spinning on bearings lol
 
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