JB's wheels

G

Guest

Guest
JB,
Its all been said by our friends here. But I rarely run my 265/70/16's
above 32psi. Last year at this time, the 'new' 1996 80 I bought for the
office came under complaint by one of our drivers for its bad handling; and
when I checked he had put the tyres at 3 bar (44psi approx). Somewhat
different handling when I lowered the pressure early one morning when it
was cold.
Do the 4psi check described here for Mik a couple of months ago. (And in
summer check the pressures about 7.00am and no later).
I think we all have to remember that those who do not care about their 4WD,
like tyre fitters, just think that its a big ugly car with equally big ugly
tyres and they whop in too much pressure. They look at a Fiesta running on
28psi so assume the 80's 3 times bigger wheels as needing far more
pressure. So much for their training certificates proudly displayed on the
reception office wall !
On torque wrenches, its is the law in UK that all tyre shops check the
torque after they have put the airgun on them to attach the wheels to the
hub. They also have to print on the invoice that the torque should be
checked again after 100 miles.
A Draper wrench costs 24 quid for a 'clicker' and 9 quid for a torsion bar
type - which some say is more reliable though its not always easy to see
the calibration indicator. Large High Street retailers have 'clicker's' for
14.75 (Argos). But if you buy a clicker, remember to slacken the mechanism
right off whenever you are not using it, even if its for just 10 minutes
whilst you are doing a multiple torqueing job.
As for loss of acceleration, its basic physics as Roman pointed out - but
you are not a boy racer, are you? ;o)
Cheers
Jon
'92 HZJ80 ex UN surplus from Bosnia, now sharing time between Alfold Surrey
and Tring Herts. With the boat engine head in the machine shop having all
valve inserts renewed ;o(
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hey Jon
I was wondering when you would post to help me in my hour of need. I hear
you say that seems to be all the ------ time. Ah now its not as bad as
that, IS IT its just as you pointed out Im very interested in doing things
the right way the first time unlike others who as you have said see the
cruiser as big and ugly. What torgue pressure should each nut be at when I
do buy the wrench please. I have lowered the pressure to 28 all round and
will see what effect that has over the next day. But as usual I know you are
all right because you have been there and that is where I want to go. I did
check all the nuts and found three on different wheels some what not as
tight as the others.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon C-W" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2005 8:53 AM
Subject: [ELCO] JB's wheels
 
G

Guest

Guest
JB wrote...
What torgue pressure should each nut be at when I
do buy the wrench please. I have lowered the pressure to 28 all round and
will see what effect that has over the next day. But as usual I know you are
all right because you have been there and that is where I want to go. I did
check all the nuts and found three on different wheels some what not as
tight as the others.
SNIP..
You are going the right way JB, don't fret. You may remember that I am
certainly no fan of alloys on 4WD's and would never have them as a gift,
but that is just me I guess. But in the rough stuff steel wheels don't
crack, split, warp, chip or corrode as quickly when the lacquer starts to
craze round the stud holes. But as long as you are happy, and we all know
that you will look after them with all the care you lavish on your 80.
I think the torque values have been given here already, and certainly many
times on the 80scool list too. I just have the Haynes manual to go by which
give a blanket 90lbs without defining any difference between steel and
alloy. (Haynes for my Pajero gives a more vague '100-120lbs'!) But I would
rather go by the FSM which will give the variations if I had alloys, and
also may vary with the different dates of manufacture as the hub
construction varied over the lifespan of the 80 too. Remember also that all
manufacturers supply a custom made spanner for the nuts when the car is
new. The length of the spanner - it is said - is always carefully
calculated to give enough torque to the nut by a male driver of average
weight, thus limiting the possibility of over-tightening . (Now think of
the twist you could put on a breaker bar and socket if you wanted?) So till
you get the torque wrench you have the best spanner to hand already.
I think 90lbs is appropriate and go no further, and glad too as I would not
want to have the problems others have with sheared studs. But I have
replaced one stud when the thread got tighter for no reason save for an odd
nut left to me by the UN !
You are right to go round checking and you have proved the comments made by
others on the instability of alloy wheels. I have had two saloon cars with
alloys, and with the first I soon learned the abuse that can unwittingly be
given by an ignorant mechanic. I put the car into Lex Autoservice for a
regular service. I had a puncture in a day or two and when I took the wheel
off the studs were covered in grease, whilst I remember before that they
had no grease on them, following the car's handbook instructions. I took
the punctured tyre to a mate who owned a tyre depot and mentioned this to
him. He told me that when a car is supplied with alloys from new the studs
have a more-or-less permanent coating of a loctite type substance (green
coloured on my Opel Senator). This he said was needed as the alloys creep
as they constantly flex in rotation which slackens the nuts. The stuff used
on the studs provides enough lubrication to get the threads to tighten but
then holds on to them. My mate got his men to take all the wheels off,
clean off the copper grease with solvent and apply some new 'alloy stud
lubricant' the loctite stuff whatever its called. It was a lengthy job but
thankfully cost me nothing as I did some welding on his boat. But there
again, I may be talking out of my sphincter when it comes to alloys on a
TLC ;o)
Stay safe JB.
Cheers
Jon
'92 HZJ80 ex UN surplus from Bosnia, now sharing time between Alfold Surrey
and Tring Herts. Still waiting for my cylinder heads :o(
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hey Jon-C-W
Thanks for all that info and as usual I am very greatful . I did that the
advice of you all and bought a torgue wrench in Argos for 22 euro. I thought
that was good value and its a fine piece of wrench too. I did all the nuts
and again you were all right, in that every nut was way too tight and had to
be looseded and then retightened with the T wrench. After reading the link
that someone sent to me from the list about over tightening the nuts, I just
had to buy the T wrench to be sure. Its amazing how much I can learn from
even wheels that up to know I had tightened as much as I could in the
belief that the tighter the better.
It was while putting the new wheels on and the spare that I realised that
the under cruiser way of carrying the spare would need to be upgraded if at
all possible. It was very tricky for the garage guy and me to position the
new wheel what with the chain sticking and giving me more back strain that I
need and the thought of having to do that on my own some where not even
surfaced, wet/dark and cold as it always will be when you get a flat did
nothing for me
Thanks
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Ireland.
 
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