Modern Cruiser problems

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I have a HJ60 cruiser, and so far the worst problem I have had with the
electrics on this 25 year old vehicle, in the time that I have owned it (15
years), is needing new glow plugs.
I just read a thread about a 94 cruiser, with auto box. The owner was stuck
in park, and could not get the vehicle to change gear. Apparently the
problem was the brake light circuit having a blown fuse!!
Is this really a true story, IE could this happen, and if so what other
electronic "jokes" have been built in to the electronics of these modern
cruisers.
I was thinking of putting the old HJ60 out to grass, and getting a new LWB
cruiser, but if they have dodgy electronics that cause problems like this,
then I think I will keep the 82 HJ60.
I have had mine for so long, and no problems, I just assumed the new
cruisers were just as reliable, but if stories like this, and problems my
mate has with his modern coil sprung SWB cruiser are typical, then I think I
will just forget it and spend a few grand on doing the old girl up.
Please let me know before I waste my money on a modern vehicle full of
electronic crap.
Neil
 
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Neil,
I've had a similar issue where the truck won't start (blown fuse)
It was after washing (jet spray so methinks I was a bit 2 forceful in certain spots!) so knew what the issue was.
Once I fixed the fuse the gears won't move outa park (I have a 96 US auto). Was able 2 fix that using a screwdriver near the gearstick (after popping a tab).
thats only happened once in the 10 yrs I've had the car.
Only other issues (electrical) were due to some early teething issues with LPG and bad wiring installation.
Had some mechanical issues but nothing of significance (radiator and fan VC, worn CV/Birfs, rear diff issues due 2 water), broken bolts (rust)
Lal
150K on 96 FZJ80 in Colorado, USA
Neil Paisnel wrote:
 
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Hi Lubo
LWB =long wheel base and SWB = short wheel base.
cheers
john
SNIP
92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
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Hi Lal
What tab and what did you do with the screw driver.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
SNIP
Was able 2 fix that using a screwdriver near the gearstick (after popping a
tab).
 
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Yes probably true. On most auto boxes there is a solenoid that needs to be energised to move from park, supply is often from the beake circuit.
-----------------------------------
Is this really a true story, IE could this happen, and if so what other
electronic "jokes" have been built in to the electronics of these modern
cruisers.
Neil
 
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Hi Neil,
I think that auto versions of your 60 may actually be wired the same way
;-)
Basically if a brake light goes it does have a habit of blowing the fuse
which prevents you from getting out of park - yes it is a minor
irritant, but not the end of the world.
Japanese models actually have a little red switch beside the shifter
that you can use to override this lock out.
If you don't have that just make sure you have spare brake bulbs and
fuses - something that you should carry anyway ;-)
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Hi Neil,
I think that auto versions of your 60 may actually be wired the same way
;-)
Basically if a brake light goes it does have a habit of blowing the fuse
which prevents you from getting out of park - yes it is a minor
irritant, but not the end of the world.
Japanese models actually have a little red switch beside the shifter
that you can use to override this lock out.
If you don't have that just make sure you have spare brake bulbs and
fuses - something that you should carry anyway ;-)
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Neil
| Please let me know before I waste my money on a modern vehicle full of
| electronic crap.
What about a manual gearbox 80 series? I'm totally with you on the
"electronic crap" front, and there is precious little of that on mine.
No electronics anywhere in the engine/drive-line, and you can bump-start
it if the battery is flat.
I think all Landcruisers from the 1997/98 100 series onwards will have
some degree of electronics, although I don't think I've heard of any
problems with the electronics on the fuel pump.
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
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Jon
| You do have an electric fuel shut off solenoid. If the fuse to that
blows
| even a bump start won't get you going. I wonder if you can bump start
with
| no battery at all, i.e. does the alternator generate enough power to
| activate the shut off solenoid?
|
| You can remove the solenoid, take out the plunger and re-fit to get
round
| a fault (assuming it's not just the fuse!). You'll have to stall or
starve
| the engine to turn it off though.
|
| Unless a 60 series has a cable operated 'stop' for the engine that
will
| have the same issue.
|
| Best regards,
| Jon
I thought of that after I hit "send".
I'd say that the fuel cut-off is "electric", not "electronic", but
that's a quibble.
Probably anything that delivers 9+ volts or so will hold the fuel
cut-off open, and if the batteries were totally, utterly dead that's
what I'd try first. However I've never seen a lead-acid battery in such
a low state that there is absolutely *no* voltage across it.
I know I'm in a minority of one here, but if I were heading into the
back of beyond I would *much* prefer my manual simply because the
chances of starting it with a dead battery or starter motor are so much
better; and if it had real problems then towing it long distances would
not be an issue.
Also, thinking of the thread last week about security, hot-wiring the
fuel cut-off plus bump-starting would easily defeat a bolshy
immobiliser.
CB
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Hi Christopher,
And just to be padantic, you have electronic/electric circuits
controlling your central locking, your diff locks, etc, etc -just look
behind the kick panels in your footwells at the front of the car.
At the end of the day we are talking about Toyota electrics, not LR or
other makes - apart from known foibles like the brake fuse that are
easily fixed there really isn't anythng to worry about.
Think of the scenarios:
Dead battery - if you are on your own and not parked on a hill, you are
buggered regardless of the gearbox type. If you are with someone else,
you could get a tow with a manual, or jump start it if in an auto.
If your starter goes and you are on your own and not parked on a hill -
again you are buggered. OK if you are with someone else you can get a
tow start in a manual and are still buggered in an auto, although if you
can't fix the starter yourself they can tow you to someone that can.
So yes there are disadvantages of having an auto, however as long as you
are aware of how to fix starting issues (make sure the starter is sound
in the first place and you carry a spare set of contacts for the
solenoid) you should be OK.
To be honest you shouldn't really consider any trip off into the boonies
without knowing how to fix basic problems like that (unless you are with
someone that can) - it's just asking for trouble.
On the plus side, you are better off in an Auto for driving in muddy or
sandy conditions where the loss of momentum when changing gear can be a
problem.
You also have longer gearing in the auto (never known why) so can cruise
at lower revs on the highways.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Hi Christopher,
And just to be padantic, you have electronic/electric circuits
controlling your central locking, your diff locks, etc, etc -just look
behind the kick panels in your footwells at the front of the car.
At the end of the day we are talking about Toyota electrics, not LR or
other makes - apart from known foibles like the brake fuse that are
easily fixed there really isn't anythng to worry about.
Think of the scenarios:
Dead battery - if you are on your own and not parked on a hill, you are
buggered regardless of the gearbox type. If you are with someone else,
you could get a tow with a manual, or jump start it if in an auto.
If your starter goes and you are on your own and not parked on a hill -
again you are buggered. OK if you are with someone else you can get a
tow start in a manual and are still buggered in an auto, although if you
can't fix the starter yourself they can tow you to someone that can.
So yes there are disadvantages of having an auto, however as long as you
are aware of how to fix starting issues (make sure the starter is sound
in the first place and you carry a spare set of contacts for the
solenoid) you should be OK.
To be honest you shouldn't really consider any trip off into the boonies
without knowing how to fix basic problems like that (unless you are with
someone that can) - it's just asking for trouble.
On the plus side, you are better off in an Auto for driving in muddy or
sandy conditions where the loss of momentum when changing gear can be a
problem.
You also have longer gearing in the auto (never known why) so can cruise
at lower revs on the highways.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Even my '75 Land Cruiser has a "computer" (or had), small unit think it
operated a solenoid on the carb to open the throttle a touch on the
decelaration if the speed is above 30kph as an emissions reduction measure.
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford UK
FJ45 '75 & FJ45 '76
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Quoting Julian Voelcker <[Email address removed]>:
And you won't end up with a left leg the size of an elephants after a long trip
and squillions of gear changes...
jeremy with an auto.
 
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Julian
Oh dear, I've stirred up a hornet's nest! I still think the manual is
simpler, and that simple is good. And I am *not* impressed with the
Toyota electrics on these vehicles: they might be "better than a LR",
but that's a pretty low standard.
Perhaps I'd better stick to a Ferguson T20 then ... although I seem to
remember that the dual 6v battery setup on our old one gave problems.
CB
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For a no battery option on a 2H or 3B, how about a windup generator like the
radios to operate the solenoid on a diesel while you bump it.
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford UK
FJ45 '75 & FJ45 '76
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julian & chris
think of the scenarios:
dead battery - if you are on your own and not parked on a hill, you are
buggered regardless of the gearbox type. if you are with someone else, you
could get a tow with a manual, or jump start it if in an auto.
you're not totally buggered if you lose you starter:
sol.1: whistle up half a dozen of the natives (who have gathered to laugh
at, stare at or spit on you) to give you a push. you really have to be in
somewhere like the empty quarter to be more than a couple of k's from some
sort of humanity in africa) and wherever i have stopped (for my wife or
daughter to use the powder room) within seconds you'll get a bloke on a bike
or a couple of boys herding cattle, goats or camels that will make them (the
women folk) run squealing for cover.
sol.2: we tried this once on a safari guides course i did once: jack the
vehicle up; put the vehicle in gear; wrap a long rope around the wheel and
then pull like hell.
jeremy "--" --
self-drive safaris in east and southern africa
www.--
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uk landline: +44 (0)
skype: Fred
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Fred,
the one place in africa i know that you won't get a crowd of onlookers
once you stop is gilf kebir in the libyan desert, unpopulated by any
sort of humanity since the neolythic times. hence, i am going to carry
a spare starter on a trip there next year.
how many people do you need to start a 4.2 diesel engine that way?
--
rgds,
roman (london, uk)
'92 hdj80 (auto)
 
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Roman - Good point about the spare starter but I would certainly think very
seriously about going alone to such a place as you mentioned - if it's that
bad then I think going it alone would simply be foolish.
And as to the other Q... I think we started a diesel Hilux not a big LC so,
again, I see your point...however, as I've said, I've seen it done on
smaller vehicles and so if a whole bunch of us ever meet up maybe we can
give it a spin!
The one place in Africa I know that you won't get a crowd of onlookers
once you stop is Gilf Kebir in the Libyan Desert, unpopulated by any
sort of humanity since the neolythic times. Hence, I am going to carry
a spare starter on a trip there next year.
How many people do you need to start a 4.2 diesel engine that way?
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)

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Hi Guys
Can somone tell me why you cant tow an Auto, what is the difference between
a manual in neutral and an auto in N. Also where is this fuse or solenode .
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
SNIP
I know I'm in a minority of one here, but if I were heading into the
back of beyond I would *much* prefer my manual simply because the
chances of starting it with a dead battery or starter motor are so much
better; and if it had real problems then towing it long distances would
not be an issue.
 
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