Tales from the Workshop

G

Guest

Guest
Hi All,
Following on from my posts prior to my Morocco trip I thought I would
continue with some random findings ;-0
During our trip I started to get my first oil leak on the car, a slow
gentle drip from around the bottom of the turbo. Below the middle of
the turbo you have some pipework that takes the oil supply from the
engine up to the turbo and then a larger return pipe that lets the oil
flow back into the sump.
Where the pipe from the engine connects to the base plate that bolts to
the turbo it appears that joint can crack allowing oil under pressure
to leak out.
Working on one of the list members 80s he appears to have the same
problem.
Having taken off the pipework, it is evident that the joints are rock
solid, all except for evidently a minor crackk around part of the
joint. To solve the problem I have reverted back to plumbing days and
used some solder to seal the crack - it seems to have done a great job
so far ;-)
I have also been rebuilding a lot of brake calipers recently on various
80s and it appears that the most common problem on the front is that
the rubber seals around the top of the pistons on the front callipers
loosen up allowing dirt to get into the seal and build up around the
piston causing it to seize. The bottoms of the seals are held in place
by a metal sprung ring - as long as the rubber seals ar OK, if the tops
can also be secured in place by a similar ring, the seals should hold
out a lot longer - do any of you know of any possible suppliers?
Finally on brakes, I was talking to someone today who has had the same
failure on their rear brakes as I did a while back - the caliper is
held in place by two bolts that slide in and out of the carrier - it is
quite a common setup. If the bolts seize in the carrier, pressing the
brake pedal only acts on one pad causing it to wear out prematurely and
it doesn't take long for the remains of the pad to drop out of the
carrier and to have the brake piston acting direcly on the disk.
When ever you are checking the pads, always make sure that the calliper
can move freely in the carrier - the rear hubs get all sorts of shit
thrown up at them from the front wheels and whilst you may not need to
change the pads as often as the front it is well worth every so often
removing the rear calipers and make sure that the bolts can move in and
out ok and that the seals are holding.
Finally, I have noticed on my 80 and a few others that the inlet
manifolds are prone to leaking - if you look where the manifold is
bolted to the head you can often see oily marks around the seals - if
you rev the engine whilst running and spray on some soapy water you
will see that air is escaping - obviously more air escapes at higher
revs. I ahve no idea iof it will make any difference to the
performance of the engine, but as a short term solution I have tweaked
up all the manifold bolts to stop the leaks, but long term will look at
replacing the gaskets.
That's all for now.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi All,
Following on from my posts prior to my Morocco trip I thought I would
continue with some random findings ;-0
During our trip I started to get my first oil leak on the car, a slow
gentle drip from around the bottom of the turbo. Below the middle of
the turbo you have some pipework that takes the oil supply from the
engine up to the turbo and then a larger return pipe that lets the oil
flow back into the sump.
Where the pipe from the engine connects to the base plate that bolts to
the turbo it appears that joint can crack allowing oil under pressure
to leak out.
Working on one of the list members 80s he appears to have the same
problem.
Having taken off the pipework, it is evident that the joints are rock
solid, all except for evidently a minor crackk around part of the
joint. To solve the problem I have reverted back to plumbing days and
used some solder to seal the crack - it seems to have done a great job
so far ;-)
I have also been rebuilding a lot of brake calipers recently on various
80s and it appears that the most common problem on the front is that
the rubber seals around the top of the pistons on the front callipers
loosen up allowing dirt to get into the seal and build up around the
piston causing it to seize. The bottoms of the seals are held in place
by a metal sprung ring - as long as the rubber seals ar OK, if the tops
can also be secured in place by a similar ring, the seals should hold
out a lot longer - do any of you know of any possible suppliers?
Finally on brakes, I was talking to someone today who has had the same
failure on their rear brakes as I did a while back - the caliper is
held in place by two bolts that slide in and out of the carrier - it is
quite a common setup. If the bolts seize in the carrier, pressing the
brake pedal only acts on one pad causing it to wear out prematurely and
it doesn't take long for the remains of the pad to drop out of the
carrier and to have the brake piston acting direcly on the disk.
When ever you are checking the pads, always make sure that the calliper
can move freely in the carrier - the rear hubs get all sorts of shit
thrown up at them from the front wheels and whilst you may not need to
change the pads as often as the front it is well worth every so often
removing the rear calipers and make sure that the bolts can move in and
out ok and that the seals are holding.
Finally, I have noticed on my 80 and a few others that the inlet
manifolds are prone to leaking - if you look where the manifold is
bolted to the head you can often see oily marks around the seals - if
you rev the engine whilst running and spray on some soapy water you
will see that air is escaping - obviously more air escapes at higher
revs. I ahve no idea iof it will make any difference to the
performance of the engine, but as a short term solution I have tweaked
up all the manifold bolts to stop the leaks, but long term will look at
replacing the gaskets.
That's all for now.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hello the Julien I must thank you for this postulate, it is some very
use to me. But there is one things I do no understand much.
Well it is probely my fault for English words comes to me only to die.
But if inlet manifold mean admission as I thing then there should be
only sucking at the leaking, so how can air is escaping be? But then
you said oil marks too so may be oil is leak too?
Yes I have too see this sliding calibre setup common, but allways with
some rrubber boot there to keep the merde outside that sliding pillar.
Does our 80's not have any rubbers there?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Benoit,
The turbo blows air into the engine, which is why you can see air escaping.
The oil is from the breather pipe that comes from the cam shaft cover on
the top of the engine - you get a very fine layer of oil in the enlet
manifold and some of this escapes through the loose seals.
Yes I have the rubber boots, but these get old and worn allowing the
'merde' too get it!
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi Benoit,
The turbo blows air into the engine, which is why you can see air escaping.
The oil is from the breather pipe that comes from the cam shaft cover on
the top of the engine - you get a very fine layer of oil in the enlet
manifold and some of this escapes through the loose seals.
Yes I have the rubber boots, but these get old and worn allowing the
'merde' too get it!
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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