V. Slow leak in tyre fixed at no cost

G

Guest

Guest
I've been plagued for a year by a very slow leak in my front left wheel.
The pressure would drop from 32-ish to 22-ish over perhaps a month, but
there was no obvious sign of a leak (no visible bubbles when immersed in
water).

Prior to our recent trip to France I decided to push the pressure up the
36 psi all round, and in fact I think the garage air-line gauge I used
was a bit out because when I got home it registered 38 all round. In my
never-ending quest for economy, and in view of the increased load, I
decided to leave it be. Also my (stock, 275 / 70 R16) tyres wear
slightly more at the edges than the centre at the official 32 psi, so I
think extra pressure makes sense.

Now, six weeks later, the tyre has held its pressure, and I can only
conclude that it was weeping around the rim, and that the slight extra
pressure has given a better seal and cured the problem. I'm on the
standard alloy wheels which, I seem to remember reading somewhere, are a
bit prone to sealing problems as they get older.

I don't offer this as a scientific test as it may just be luck, but if
you are suffering a slow loss of pressure it might be worth pushing it
up an extra 10 psi or so for a few days to see if it solves the problem.


Incidentally someone is bound to ask if the extra pressure has affected
handling. The answer is either not at all, or slightly for the better
on windy roads - it's hard to tell. Certainly there are no handling
problems, and grip in the wet seems OK.

Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi Christopher,
Alloy wheels are notorious for poor seals around the rim - the varnish
covering gets damaged leading to oxidisation of the underlying alloy
material - you can see bubbling on the alloys where there have been
scratches - this occurs around the seals making it difficult to seal
properly.
Usually the solutions is to take the tyre of, clean off the rim
surfaces and then remount the tyre, although as you say upping the
pressure can do it.
I have also come across using the tyre seal in a can products for
getting you home when you have a puncture, can working well - just put
about 1/4 of the can into the tyre and then take the car for a run - it
acts as a coagulent and seals any minor holes although is a bit messy
when you eventually come to change the tyre.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Julian
| Usually the solutions is to take the tyre of, clean off the rim
| surfaces and then remount the tyre,
I got them to clean the rim when they fitted the new tyre for exactly
that reason, but obviously it didn't work.
| I have also come across using the tyre seal in a can products for
| getting you home when you have a puncture, can working well - just put
| about 1/4 of the can into the tyre and then take the car for a run -
it
| acts as a coagulent and seals any minor holes although is a bit messy
| when you eventually come to change the tyre.
I've got some of the cheaper, non-pressurised green stuff you can get
from farm shops for trailer tyres and the like. You're not supposed to
use it for cars, but who's to know?
I haven't used it on my 80 precisely because it does make such a mess.
I remember using one of those pressurised cans on my mother's car many
years ago, and being comprehensively cursed by the tyre people when I
eventually took it in to get a new tyre.
I just thought it was interesting that such a simple solution as extra
pressure provided a remedy.
Ho hum, back to work.
CB
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi Christopher,
I have had this as well with my mud terrains on steely rims, what I did was
took the wheel off let the air out then tyre levered all around the rim
while blowing it out with an air gun, then pumping back up and fill the side
of rim with fairy liquid to see if still leaked.
I think mine was caused due to letting the tyres down allowing mud in when
flexing the wheels/tyres ;-), then pumping them back up, hence mud jammed in
the rim.
If you have been offroading with low tyres pressures and go through wet
muddy stuff then that might be it.
Regards
Martin.
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Christopher Bell
Sent: 17 August 2007 12:00
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: [ELCO] V. Slow leak in tyre fixed at no cost
I've been plagued for a year by a very slow leak in my front left wheel.
The pressure would drop from 32-ish to 22-ish over perhaps a month, but
there was no obvious sign of a leak (no visible bubbles when immersed in
water).
Prior to our recent trip to France I decided to push the pressure up the 36
psi all round, and in fact I think the garage air-line gauge I used was a
bit out because when I got home it registered 38 all round. In my
never-ending quest for economy, and in view of the increased load, I decided
to leave it be. Also my (stock, 275 / 70 R16) tyres wear slightly more at
the edges than the centre at the official 32 psi, so I think extra pressure
makes sense.
Now, six weeks later, the tyre has held its pressure, and I can only
conclude that it was weeping around the rim, and that the slight extra
pressure has given a better seal and cured the problem. I'm on the
standard alloy wheels which, I seem to remember reading somewhere, are a bit
prone to sealing problems as they get older.
I don't offer this as a scientific test as it may just be luck, but if you
are suffering a slow loss of pressure it might be worth pushing it up an
extra 10 psi or so for a few days to see if it solves the problem.
Incidentally someone is bound to ask if the extra pressure has affected
handling. The answer is either not at all, or slightly for the better on
windy roads - it's hard to tell. Certainly there are no handling problems,
and grip in the wet seems OK.
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
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G

Guest

Guest
This probleme does not much exist if you put internal "beadlocks" from
Australie in there. They is like a 2end tire inside the first tire.
You never let out the air from the inside tire, and it keep the side
walls pushed firmly into the wheels even if your first tire is sunk
down to 300gr pression for mud or some thing.
They are expensif but now 4 years going I have no more leaks on
wheels. Before I have always this hell you talk about with the little
leaks making butt cheeks mad, Martin Naylor .
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Guys
Before I changed my rims years ago I was pestered by slow leaks with the oem
rims.
Just on the subject of tyres and bead locks and such.
Has anyone had a blow out with a cruiser on a road at speed.
Just wondering cause of the weight of the vehicle and how she would react
knowing how unstable they can be at angles on roads with bends.
Also a while back well a good while I seem to remember there was a system
like a tube inside a tyre but small that would allow you to let your tyres
down very low and would also safe guard against tyre failure.
But because I lost all info on the PC Im trying to remember, which is patchy
to say the least.
cheers
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
G

Guest

Guest
John,
I had a blow out last year doing 70-80mph on a motorway.
Was rear left tire.
Heard the rubber as it disintegrated (more than the blowout noise) and could see it in the rear mirror
Was able to pull over ok and reasonably stable
Was a bitch 2 change as had locking nuts and couldn't find the 'key'
Lal
john byrne wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hello the guys ;-)
I've had these "bead locks" and would not recommend them. They are a
pig to fit, a pig to remove, and a pig to balance the wheel.
Also, they cause plenty of rubbing inside the tyre and do not protect
the inner tube, so in case of a serious puncture the bead locks needs
to be removed and you are left with a rather useless extra hole in the
rim.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On 8/20/07, john byrne <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi ther Roman,
I thing you must have some differents bead locks. I did control mine
with careful eye before buy them, and my friend garagist does run on
them now 4 years with not the problems you have.
The inner chambre is all protected on mine. May be yours come from
Amrerica or German, I also see them offred there but they are green
colour.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Benoit,
Mine were called SecondAir. I think they are also marketed as Staun. I
suppose you can run on them with no problem only when they are not
really needed. But when you do need them, very you soon realise they
are crap.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
On 8/21/07, Benoit Bernard <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Yes I must have not experience on those German ones. As you says
"crap" my friend says that means butt cheeks low qualit=E9. But mine
come from Australie. If they are "crap" I promise on telling you all
the guys.
 
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