advice or help

G

Guest

Guest
Hi Guys
I was out today changing the engine oil from Dino to Synth and did the flush
and all that. When I was checking and wiping under the engine of bits of
fluid just so if the engine springs a leak I will know. Lying under the
cruiser I found a little fluid at the back of the engine, between the engine
and I presume the gear box.
When I wiped it a black plastic cover fell onto the ground. The cover is
made of black rubber with the word (UP) on it and an arrow pointing in that
direction of (UP).
The cover does not seem to be sealed in place but instead has three clips or
catches on it, again I presume to keep it in place in the hole it was
intended to plug.
It is not really flexable and is moulded to fit the hole it was entented
for.
This cover fell from the gap between the engine and the gearbox??.
Just back from the drain plug is a gap between the engine sump and the next
big lump of metal.
O shit I have done something that I shoudn't have.
What is this cover for and should I just put it back or should I seal it
back into position.
What is in the hole that this cover fits.
Should I fill it will some sort of oil or grease before I replace the cover.
If I cant get it back what will happen.
There does not seem to be any liquids or anything else coming out of the
hole at the moment.
Any ideas would help my heart to settle down from the presant 300 beats a
minute. I have the nack of making the easiest of jobs more complcated, it
really is a skill I have.
thanks
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
Don't panic John, it *sounds* like the access cover for the bottom of
the fly wheel. Mines never even had one though I keep meaning to buy one
so it can survive without it till you work out how to refit.
There's no oil to put in there. The cover will stop a stone accidentally
getting up there and causing trouble but otherwise it's not meant to be
sealed. Mine has gone through all sorts of crap in the last 5 years
without a cover on ...
Never having had one I don't know how it fits back on but thought I'd
answer while we wait for someone who has the real answer to come along.
Best regards,
Jon.
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of John Byrne
Sent: 02 January 2006 14:37
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: [ELCO] advice or help
Hi Guys
I was out today changing the engine oil from Dino to Synth and did the
flush
and all that. When I was checking and wiping under the engine of bits of
fluid just so if the engine springs a leak I will know. Lying under the
cruiser I found a little fluid at the back of the engine, between the
engine
and I presume the gear box.
When I wiped it a black plastic cover fell onto the ground. The cover is
made of black rubber with the word (UP) on it and an arrow pointing in
that
direction of (UP).
The cover does not seem to be sealed in place but instead has three
clips or
catches on it, again I presume to keep it in place in the hole it was
intended to plug.
It is not really flexable and is moulded to fit the hole it was entented
for.
This cover fell from the gap between the engine and the gearbox??.
Just back from the drain plug is a gap between the engine sump and the
next
big lump of metal.
O shit I have done something that I shoudn't have.
What is this cover for and should I just put it back or should I seal
it
back into position.
What is in the hole that this cover fits.
Should I fill it will some sort of oil or grease before I replace the
cover.
If I cant get it back what will happen.
There does not seem to be any liquids or anything else coming out of the
hole at the moment.
Any ideas would help my heart to settle down from the presant 300 beats
a
minute. I have the nack of making the easiest of jobs more complcated,
it
really is a skill I have.
thanks
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hey Jon
Thanks for that piece of mind info. Its just when I do something and
something else happens I wonder what the hell I have done. Only knowing so
much it can be a handycap at times but I learn more and more all the time. I
had a look in the hole and it is bone dry inside as you say. I did think it
was just a cover but when you dont know you just dont know. Ok maybe you
dont want me to ask this but what is in there ( the flywheel) and what is it
for or what does it do.
cheers
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon Wildsmith" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 3:03 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] advice or help
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi John,
You always ask such simple questions ;-)
That space you're looking at is the inside of the bell housing which is
the casing between the engine and the gearbox. Inside there is the
flywheel which is attached to the engine crank shaft so goes round and
round as the crank is turned. If I remember rightly you have an auto -
auto's have a torque converter bolted to the flywheel, manuals have a
clutch bolted to the flywheel. The gearbox input shaft goes into the
centre of the torque converter or clutch to transmit power into the
gearbox. Off to one side there's also the end of the starter motor. When
the starter motor is spinning it has a gear that engages with the teeth
around the edge of the flywheel to turn the engine over.
Best regards,
Jon.
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of John Byrne
Sent: 02 January 2006 15:26
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] advice or help
Hey Jon
Thanks for that piece of mind info. Its just when I do something and
something else happens I wonder what the hell I have done. Only knowing
so
much it can be a handycap at times but I learn more and more all the
time. I
had a look in the hole and it is bone dry inside as you say. I did think
it
was just a cover but when you dont know you just dont know. Ok maybe you
dont want me to ask this but what is in there ( the flywheel) and what
is it
for or what does it do.
cheers
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon Wildsmith" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 3:03 PM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] advice or help
one
accidentally
be
along.
[mailto:[Email address removed]]
of
the
is
entented
the
beats
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here
G

Guest

Guest
Hey Jon
Thanks for getting back , just another valuable piece of info to add to my
collection and hopfully the old gray matter will remember it.
Regarding the gear box your right its an auto.
I have not driven a manual in about 10 years.
Regarding the auto V the manual, what is the torque converter for and why
does the auto have one and not the manual box.
I would also like to know why the Auto box has different fluid in it
compared to the manual.
Are the gears different between the two or is there another reason.
Im getting hungry for information again sorry.
Im thinking about changing the ATF in the Auto box to synth but know I need
to completely change all the ATF at once.
I also know there is a lot of ATF stored in the torque converter which
hinders a full, complete change.
I know I can leave the cruiser into Toy to get this chance over done but why
should I if it can be done by me.
I reakon if they can do it, well maybe and it is a big maybe, but maybe I
could do it, yea right I hear you all say, this guy is lucky if he can
change a flat tyre. So if any one knows how to do it, or more correctly
thinks it can be done by your truly, well let me know.
John C
92HDJ 1HDT
Rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi John
Happy New Year.
Torque converter is an integral part of any auto gearbox set-up, not
required on a manual. Don't ask me how a TC works because I haven't a
clue but it effectively takes the place of the clutch I believe. Don't
worry about it anyway is my advice :)
I wouldn't worry about swapping over to synth ATF either but if you do
then you really need to do a FULL fluid change. As you rightly said
there is a large amount (several litres) of ATF that does not come out
with a simple gearbox drain operation, it has to be pumped out. I looked
at doing this and rapidly decided it wasn't worth the time, effort or
cash involved.
I would simply drain the gearbox and refill with ordinary ATF. Run this
for a few days and then drain and refill again. Repeat this two or three
times more after which most of the old fluid will have been "diluted
out" of the system and replaced with fresh ATF. Changing the ATF makes a
surprisingly big difference to the gearchange - much smoother I found.
A point worth bearing in mind is to measure the volume of ATF drained
out. You can then simply pour in the same amount of new fluid. It's not
easy to get the level correct otherwise.
Pete
John Byrne wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi John,
If you want to understand more about Torque Converters and the
differences between auto and manual gearboxes I should do a bit of
googling, I'm sure you'll find lots of useful information as I'm no
expert to fill in all the gaps I'm afraid. Crudely the Torque Converter
on an auto replaces the clutch in a manual and they have different oils
because they do their job in very different ways.
Have you refitted the cover that dropped off and started this
conversation yet?
Best regards,
Jon.
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of John Byrne
Sent: 03 January 2006 00:41
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] advice or help
Hey Jon
Thanks for getting back , just another valuable piece of info to add to
my
collection and hopfully the old gray matter will remember it.
Regarding the gear box your right its an auto.
I have not driven a manual in about 10 years.
Regarding the auto V the manual, what is the torque converter for and
why
does the auto have one and not the manual box.
I would also like to know why the Auto box has different fluid in it
compared to the manual.
Are the gears different between the two or is there another reason.
Im getting hungry for information again sorry.
Im thinking about changing the ATF in the Auto box to synth but know I
need
to completely change all the ATF at once.
I also know there is a lot of ATF stored in the torque converter which
hinders a full, complete change.
I know I can leave the cruiser into Toy to get this chance over done but
why
should I if it can be done by me.
I reakon if they can do it, well maybe and it is a big maybe, but
maybe I
could do it, yea right I hear you all say, this guy is lucky if he can
change a flat tyre. So if any one knows how to do it, or more correctly
thinks it can be done by your truly, well let me know.
John C
92HDJ 1HDT
Rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Peter
And a happy new year to you too. I have changed the ATF just like you said
bit by bit months ago and I am just thinking of the next stage of my
cruiser protection.
I reakon its cheaper in the long run to pay for better oil than to pay for
something going wrong and then relising O maybe I should have used better
oil.
Not long after getting my Cruiser the big end bearing died and cost me a
hell of a lot of money.
I had to skip dinner for months to pay for it and sell the dog, or was that
next doors dog and this problem is linked to poor changing of the oil and
using crappy oil
I used only the best mineral oil I could find up to know and now its changed
to synth which is much better.
I have had my bad events with the cruiser and will try to prevent them from
occuring again if I can.
This I promised I would do a bit at a time because of the expense.
I will change the ATF to synth in a while, but theres no rush I think.
changing and last a hell of a lot longer. It will also have the ability to
keep the box that bit cooler firstly because of the better stability of the
ATF to resist break down and secondly because of its better thermal or
higher flash point.
I will also get some synth for the Diffs and the Transfere case as soon as I
can.
Whats involved in doing a complete change of the ATF.
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi John
I have put synth oils in the engine, diffs and transfer box. I found it
made a big difference in terms of a quieter drivetrain and less
"clonking" so I think it's money well spent, not so sure about the
engine oil but it's been fine so far. The only reason I didn't do the
same for the gearbox is the need to completely flush out the old fluid.
You need two buckets, some tubing and a lot of ATF; I think the details
of how to do it are somewhere in the birfield.com archives. Do a search
for "two bucket method", that should find it.
In brief I think you have to disconnect the pipes that feed the gearbox
oil cooler, drop the exit end in an empty bucket and the input end into
a bucket full of new ATF. You then run the engine whilst cycling the
gearbox through all gears; the pump draws in new fluid from the bucket
and expells the old into the empty one and eventually you get all new
fluid in the box.
Do a search for the exact method though.
Pete
John Byrne wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jon
Thanks again for the advice. I do go looking for info on the net but
sometimes because I dont have the basics of the mechanical side of things,
it can get too technical for me and I lose interest.
There is no supstitute for a guy who knows what he is talking about and then
being able to put that technical stuff in lay mans terms.
Its the same for the electrical side of things, if you know you know and if
you dont its really difficult.
I also find if you are doing something every day or very often, it becomes
easy but if you only come across a problem once and have to learn a lot
just to fix that problem its difficult.
Then of course its also easy to forget what you learned if you dont use that
knowledge over and over again.
Repitition is a wonderful thing. OK ill shut up now.
John C
92HDJ 80 1HDT Rep of Ireland
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon Wildsmith" <[Email address removed]>
To: <[Email address removed]>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2006 10:18 AM
Subject: RE: [ELCO] advice or help
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks