Back from a trip, clonking CV joints and 32 mpg

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Guest

Guest
Hi all
I've just come back from a 5k miles European mini grand tour and have been curing my ELCO withdrawal symptoms by reading the accumulated posts.
We had no vehicle problems, although after a succession of alpine passes + associated endless hairpin bends the universal joints have now moved from the "they are clonking a bit" to "I really am going to have to fix them" category. I decided that I wanted an auto gearbox for ascending mountains (we were overtaken by a bus going up one!) but was extremely relieved to have a manual one for the descents: I managed to induce the beginnings of brake fade when I attempted to speed up descents by using higher gears and hitting the brakes harder for the bends.
I was interested to read that someone's idle speed has dropped when warm, as mine did that too as we went south. Since it seemed to happen after a fuel refill I initially put it down to French diesel, but in fact it has stayed that way - so could this be due to the warmer weather? Does the injection pump have a temperature related timing advance/retard? I resorted to pulling out the fast idle knob a touch to compensate. Or is it the dreaded "zero" sulphur fuel effect on my injection pump? I'll be interested to see what happens after a tank of UK-based fuel - which I see is now =A31 per litre :-(
Interestingly altitude didn't seem to affect engine performance, at least not up to the 2600 metres we reached. And, so far as I can tell, engine oil consumption has been zero.
And 32.1 mpg - yes really: and 3 successive tanks full all delivered over 31 mpg. But it takes holiday mode (laid back) driving style + usage of poor French D and C roads, which limit your speed to a max of 45 mph, to achieve this. Given the amount of up and downhill, lower gear, work that this included it suggests to me that the best way to improve fuel economy in an 80 series is to forget engine mods and to improve the aerodynamics!
Other issues? I drove really carefully and slowly in Italy, but obviously local 4x4 owners have a somewhat different reputation as, after a few days, it began to dawn on us that quite a lot of people were actually pulling over into the ditch and stopping when they saw us coming down a narrow road! Italian driving style is quite fun once you get the hang of it: fast and unforgiving, but somehow more "con brio" than aggressive.
We only saw 6 other TLCs, including one in France that absolutely roared past me going uphill - but judging by the noise and smoke he had a mega-bore exhaust and a well tweaked fuel system.
Sorry, I'm wasting bandwidth by rambling.
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
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Guest
Hi Chris,
Welcome back, sounds like you had a good trip.
The key with the CVs is to make sure that they have plenty of grease in
them - that should keep them away from the critical list for a bit
longer, unless they are leaking oil from a failed inner axle seal.
Do you want me to rebook you in to get them replaced?
The fuel consumtion is encouraging, I would love to be getting around
that. Over my week in Devon (just the other side of Okehampton from
you) I was getting around 370miles from a tank (about 22mpg)!!
I know my injectors desperately need servicing, however I noticed an
oddity. With biodiesel I get noticeably more power but consumption
goes down to 18mpg - whilst an increase in power is often related to
higher fuel consumption, you wouldn't expect it with just swapping
fuel.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Julian
Yes, good trip. Spent a lot of money though!
The CV joints are well greased: I did it before I left which quietened them down a lot, but they really *didn't* like the hairpins on the Alpine passes one little bit (1st gear, full lock and full throttle while ascending - my fault for choosing the most interesting looking roads we could find) and they now make a noise every time I pull away from a standstill with any sort of lock applied.
Thanks for the offer, but I've taken the chicken out approach and have booked it into a local 4x4 place down the road from here. =A335/hour for labour, but it's much closer and they have worked on 80 series before - although most of their work is on Land Rovers - and they knew instantly what I was talking about.
I too was amazed by the fuel economy. I think it mainly came from running an un-turbocharged engine: at 45mph I'm doing less than 1800rpm in 5th, below which I don't get any oomph from the turbo. Also I'm more than ever convinced that aerodynamics are the key: probably my sagging rear springs help matters, and I'm convinced that lifting the suspension would make it worse.
I too wonder about the injectors and pump. I've now done 128k miles, and while it's going fine I'm not sure what the right thing to do is: having read Simon's posts it seems that just doing the injectors is not enough, and the pump will need servicing too. (What's the latest Simon?)
Also "doing" injectors, especially for my 1HD-FT, sounds complex and I think I'd go for new ones. And then just getting them out of the engine looks tricky in itself: because the 1HD-FT has EGR kit the crossover pipe is more complex, with connections to the exhaust manifold, and it will have to come off to get rocker head cover off and the injectors out.
My feeling at present is that the current engine setup will probably run without serious attention to 200 - 250k miles, ie another 7 to 10 years, by which time the vehicle will be almost worthless. Within that period I expect to be minus our eldest three girls and their horses (sniff), so I'll probably sell it and get something smaller.
I think my power train is more likely to give trouble in that time frame: the transfer box is a bit noisy when hot and the "shunt" in the transmission is (subjectively) greater than before, although part of that will of course be the CV joints.
I was chatting to a mother of one the children's friends yesterday, who has two lots of twin boys and a Land Rover 110 County. She was describing the discomfort of a journey to Rutland: uncomfortable seats, no a/c, noise at 70mph drowns out stereo ... and the temperature gauge in the red! And I compared it (silently) to our 80 series that averaged 300 miles a day taking us across Europe in comfort in 35+ deg C heat...
Christopher Bell
| Hi Chris,
|
| Welcome back, sounds like you had a good trip.
|
| The key with the CVs is to make sure that they have plenty of
| grease in them - that should keep them away from the critical
| list for a bit longer, unless they are leaking oil from a
| failed inner axle seal.
|
| Do you want me to rebook you in to get them replaced?
|
| The fuel consumtion is encouraging, I would love to be
| getting around that. Over my week in Devon (just the other
| side of Okehampton from
| you) I was getting around 370miles from a tank (about 22mpg)!!
|
| I know my injectors desperately need servicing, however I
| noticed an oddity. With biodiesel I get noticeably more
| power but consumption goes down to 18mpg - whilst an increase
| in power is often related to higher fuel consumption, you
| wouldn't expect it with just swapping fuel.
| --
| Regards,
|
| Julian Voelcker
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi Christopher,
Fair enough.
Key things to watch out for...
They should get the knuckle seal kit from Milners (about ?30) - nobody
can touch them on price, however you are advised to get the genuine
inner axle seal from Toyota (about ?8.50 a corner).
When replacing the cv joint (also cheaper from Milners) you should also
replace the end plate that transfers the drive from the CV to the hub.
Whilst in there you might want to consider replacing the wheel bearings
and possibly the knuckle bearings - all pretty cheap from Milners.
Also check the brake disks. If you haven't replaced them yet, they
will most likely need doing (they usually do around the 90-110k miles
mark).
Make sure that they have the proper 54mm thin walled hub socket - it is
bigger than required on Landrovers and is essential for getting the
wheel bearings properly bedded in and torqued up. Also it has to be
thin walled for your post 95 hub.
Whilst under the vehicle also get them to check the UJs - they may be
the cause of some of the transmission clunk as well as noise.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

Guest
Julian
Thanks. They are pricing up and I'll pass on your comments about the extra bits & bobs.
I'll get them to check brake disk wear too, but I suspect that won't be an issue: judging by my (lack of) brake pad usage I think I'll be OK, as the manual box is much easier on brakes.
CB

| Hi Christopher,
|
| > Thanks for the offer, but I've taken the chicken out
| approach and have
| > booked it into a local 4x4 place down the road from here.
| > =A335/hour
| > for labour, but it's much closer and they have worked on 80 series
| > before
|
| Fair enough.
|
| Key things to watch out for...
|
| They should get the knuckle seal kit from Milners (about =A330)
| - nobody can touch them on price, however you are advised to
| get the genuine inner axle seal from Toyota (about =A38.50 a corner).
|
| When replacing the cv joint (also cheaper from Milners) you
| should also replace the end plate that transfers the drive
| from the CV to the hub.
|
| Whilst in there you might want to consider replacing the
| wheel bearings and possibly the knuckle bearings - all pretty
| cheap from Milners.
|
| Also check the brake disks. If you haven't replaced them
| yet, they will most likely need doing (they usually do around
| the 90-110k miles mark).
|
| Make sure that they have the proper 54mm thin walled hub
| socket - it is bigger than required on Landrovers and is
| essential for getting the wheel bearings properly bedded in
| and torqued up. Also it has to be thin walled for your post 95 hub.
|
| Whilst under the vehicle also get them to check the UJs -
| they may be the cause of some of the transmission clunk as
| well as noise.
| --
| Regards,
|
| Julian Voelcker
____________________________________________________________
Electronic mail messages entering and leaving Arup business
systems are scanned for acceptability of content and viruses
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Christopher,
Depends whose driving!! Last August I looked at 8 or so manual 24valve
80s around the 90-120k miles mark and they all either had new disks on
or were in need of new disks.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
I'll get them to check. It's 32mm nominal, 30mm min on the front and
18/16mm on the rear isn't it? Possibly superseded by anything marked on
the disc.
CB
| Hi Christopher,
|
| > I'll get them to check brake disk wear too, but I suspect
| that won't
| > be an issue: judging by my (lack of) brake pad usage I
| think I'll be
| > OK, as the manual box is much easier on brakes.
|
| Depends whose driving!! Last August I looked at 8 or so
| manual 24valve 80s around the 90-120k miles mark and they all
| either had new disks on or were in need of new disks.
| --
| Regards,
|
| Julian Voelcker
____________________________________________________________
Electronic mail messages entering and leaving Arup business
systems are scanned for acceptability of content and viruses
 
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