Help buying auto or manual

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Poppy, welcome to the list.
I have driven extensively on Lanzarote so appreciate your conditions.
I have also spent many years driving a range of 4WD's on rock roads
in the Balkans.
I would go for a manual not auto. As Chris says, in your traffic-free
driving you do not need to be relieved of the effort of gearchanging
in traffic with an auto, and you have a lot more control over the
vehicle especially on gradients with a manual. The maintenance issue
is also another point. Although the TLC auto is bulletproof compared
with others, it still needs careful maintenance by someone who is
fully trained to a high standard. Manual gearboxes are easy to
maintain by anyone and will outlast the auto given that you top up
and change the oil regularly. They are also easier to sell-on, there
is always a lot of suspicion of a second-hand car with an auto box,
unless you are trading-in for a replacement model at a dealership.
Your clutch wear should also be minimal with the driving style you
will have on the islands, with little stop-start use in queues. Don't
be put off by Lubo's comments either !
Lubo - I second Chris, the stiff second gear selection is a 'feature'
of the 80 and no more. If it reassures you, I had my box rebuilt
earlier this year with a 'new' exchange gearset and new bearings, oil
seals and synchro rings and hubs. I naturally also had the clutch
replaced. Since then the box has performed effortlessly. It still
needs that slight hesitation in neutral between gears when changing,
but that is a 'feature' of a new vehicle too. So its time you got
your box overhauled I think.
Cheers
Jon
Herts
'92 HZJ80 ex UN Bosnia surplus
 
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Perhaps predictably, I'm going to disagree with all that Jon says - almost.
Control with an auto on gradients etc is simple - hit the switch to disable
the overdrive, or drop it into 2nd or 1st, depending on speed. In north
africa last year, I was more than grateful that I didn't have to use a
clutch on my car on steep rocky descents. Low gears, occasionaly in low
ration gave me much more safe control of my car than a manual would have
done, bearing in mind all I was having to do at the wheel. Maintenance with
these auto boxes is rarely an issue as they are so well built and it will
only be a problem if you fail to look after it. You can also fit an extra
oil cooler if you are worried about the temperature. Not sure the longevity
comment is true either. I've never come across any suspicion anywhere with
selling auto boxes. Quite the opposite.
I gave up banging my left foot up and don years ago and couldn't be happier.
I disagree with the control theory as I use my box a fair bit and I have
driven in conditions that vary from sand, rocks, snow, London, mud etc. and
yes I have even towed hefty weights behind.
Auto.
Jeremy
HDJ-81 with an auto box and many of the usual suspects.
On 29/5/06 10:44, "Jon C-W" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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On May 29, 2006, at 11:44 AM, Jon C-W wrote:
> Lubo - I second Chris, the stiff second gear selection is a
> 'feature' of the 80 and no more. If it reassures you, I had my box
> rebuilt earlier this year with a 'new' exchange gearset and new
> bearings, oil seals and synchro rings and hubs. I naturally also
> had the clutch replaced. Since then the box has performed
> effortlessly. It still needs that slight hesitation in neutral
> between gears when changing, but that is a 'feature' of a new
> vehicle too. So its time you got your box overhauled I think.
Hi Jon
thanks for the advice but I do NOT believe I have to overhaul the
gearbox-firs I'll change the oil and see what happens :)
Cheers
Lubo
 
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On 29/5/06 11:30 am, "Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones" wrote:
Something I've always wondered about autos is how you perform a failed
hillclimb recovery? Anyone got any useful info?
Regards
Neill W
 
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Hi Neill
Not quite sure what you mean but if my guess is right, I've got low gear,
low ratio, centre diff lock, front and or rear diff lock and an engine with
some welly.
Jeremy
Having to sit at the computer and work all day...
On 29/5/06 15:13, "Neill Watson" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
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Jeremy
| Not quite sure what you mean but if my guess is right, I've
| got low gear, low ratio, centre diff lock, front and or rear
| diff lock and an engine with some welly.
|
| Jeremy
|
| Having to sit at the computer and work all day...
I think he's referring to the standard advice for when you stall a
manual box going up a steep slope: put it in reverse and turn the
starter ...
.=2E. how *do* you tackle that problem in an auto, given that you've got
to get it into "P" to start it?
Christopher Bell
(Also having to do some work this w/e, but fortunately not all day)
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I guess what I meant was do you have engine braking effect in reverse - low?
A lot of autos I've driven don't have it and freewheel backwards.
Just what you don't need when you realise you're not going to get to the top
of the muddy slimy bank and are going to have to back down for another go.
I was taught the following for a manual shift:
1. Once you know you're not going to make it, stop and hold it on the brakes
and either stall or cut the motor, leaving it in gear.
2. Let the footbrake slowly off so that it's hanging on the gear
3. Put the handbrake on and test that it's holding
3. Select reverse, clutch out, still with engine off.
4. Feet off the pedals, flick the ignition key to start and let it roll back
down on the engine braking.
Sounded a bit long winded to me. Only ever had to use it for real once and
was glad it worked OK after watching someone in a Jeep Grand Cherokee do a
toboggan impression all the way down on locked brakes :)
If you have engine braking in reverse, then I imagine it's even easier.
Neill W
On 29/5/06 3:20 pm, "Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones" wrote:
 
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On 29/5/06 3:36 pm, "Christopher Bell" wrote:
Yes, see my other posting. Unlikely that you'd stall an auto, though, unless
it got a big shock or jolt, maybe.
You can start them in 'N' or 'P'.
Neill W
 
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Neill
| Yes, see my other posting. Unlikely that you'd stall an auto,
| though, unless it got a big shock or jolt, maybe.
|
| You can start them in 'N' or 'P'.
Oh, OK - I thought you had to be in "P" and that if it moved back
against the transmission while in "P" you could have the devil's own job
shifting the gear lever. All part of my ignorance...
CB
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Guest

Guest
Almost the same as sequence I was taught, but I don't like the handbrake
part, particularly as my FJ45 has a handbrake drum on the rear prop shaft
and no locker on the rear diff. My technique is;
1. Once you know you're not going to make it, stop and hold it on the brakes
and either stall or cut the motor, leaving it in gear.
2. Keep footbrake on.
3. Select reverse, clutch out, still with engine off and foot brake on.
4. Feet off the brake, flick the ignition key to start and let it roll back
down on the engine braking.
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford, UK
1975 FJ45 Pickup (In Work)
_______________________________
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Neill Watson
Sent: 29 May 2006 15:43
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Help buying auto or manual
I guess what I meant was do you have engine braking effect in reverse - low?
A lot of autos I've driven don't have it and freewheel backwards.
Just what you don't need when you realise you're not going to get to the top
of the muddy slimy bank and are going to have to back down for another go.
I was taught the following for a manual shift:
1. Once you know you're not going to make it, stop and hold it on the brakes
and either stall or cut the motor, leaving it in gear.
2. Let the footbrake slowly off so that it's hanging on the gear
3. Put the handbrake on and test that it's holding
3. Select reverse, clutch out, still with engine off.
4. Feet off the pedals, flick the ignition key to start and let it roll back
down on the engine braking.
Sounded a bit long winded to me. Only ever had to use it for real once and
was glad it worked OK after watching someone in a Jeep Grand Cherokee do a
toboggan impression all the way down on locked brakes :)
If you have engine braking in reverse, then I imagine it's even easier.
Neill W
On 29/5/06 3:20 pm, "Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones" wrote:
with
 
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Sounds good to me, Malcolm.
Consider my technique revised!
Neill W
On 29/5/06 9:29 pm, "Malcolm Bagley" wrote:
 
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Neill,
Looking forward to trying it in the FJ45, previous experience has mostly
been in diesel 4x4's, Land Rover, Isuzu and Land Cruisers. My FJ45 has a 2F
(4.2L straight 6) engine which seems a little worn as it has low
compression, although it is supposed to have done only 27000 miles. In a
diesel low ratio & reverse usually makes a good brake and engine control is
more effective.
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford, UK
1975 FJ45 Pickup (In Work)
_______________________________
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Neill Watson
Sent: 30 May 2006 09:05
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Help buying auto or manual
Sounds good to me, Malcolm.
Consider my technique revised!
Neill W
On 29/5/06 9:29 pm, "Malcolm Bagley" wrote:
brakes
back

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