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Rustproofing, updating methods and products.

Juddian

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I've been into rustproofing for a long time, used to be a waxoyler.

I had a Hilux professionally treated, but in all honesty i can do a better job (especially considering the motor was spotless and only months old when i got it done) myself at less than half the cost.

I used a lot of Bilt Hambers waxes, and whilst more expensive the less loss of product in application works out about the same as waxoyl, they go on well, applicator nozzles and pipes for cavity waxing are superb.

More recently for external and accessible proofing i've moved on to using ACF50, other similar products are available, i've heard of people using chain lube too, sort of cross between oil and grease but it's nearly as expensive as ACF50 to buy unless i've looked in all the wrong places...but not necessarily in the right order, eh Eric?...you have to be of a certain age for that quip.

What i find with ACF50 is that whilst it does indeed wash off eventually, it's so quick in application and penetration that it's beome my go to product now, it soaks and attaches itself really well, my reapplication this year was only around 20 minutes once i'd got the motor up on the 4 ramps i use, i do the cruiser every spring and sometimes give the inner sills (these suffer bad on 90s and 120s) and any parts looking dry a quick blast over in the autumn without putting it up on the ramps.

All the products are messy, read filthy, to use, so make sure you cover yourself and the ground, hat safety glasses and mask essential, leave the ground covering down for a good few hours as it will drip.

Well, that's my current rustproofing methods.
Be interesting to hear what others are using or how regular you top up.
IMO it's the most important task after regular servicing we can do for our cruisers to make them last.
 

Tractionman

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Another good informative post on methods and materials used, something that will affect us all at some stage. Agree with Juddian totally on the last line.
This is going to be a real interesting thread as it progresses.
 

Towpack

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I've been using Corrosion Block for some time now, made by Lear Chemicals who make ACF50. I guess you could call it a slightly heavier duty version of ACF and recommended for use in salt water marine environments. I also use Aquasteel to "cure" any rust that can't be fully removed back to bare metal for whatever reason followed by a coating of chain lube. Chain lubes vary massively in consistency and effectiveness but pick the right one and I'd call it superior to any of the wax treatments available.
The strange thing is I've been using the stuff on bike chains for the best part of 40 years and never really considered this alternative use until AndycruiserguyLomas mentioned he used it!
 

AndycruiserguyLomas

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I must have used 10 aerosols of WD40 chain lube on the 120. Two every time its on the ramp. Its a sticky mess but mint underneath the mess. It'll be around when most have rusted away. The knack is buy a good one to start with.
 

Juddian

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As said its finding a good underbody to begin with, i too was lucky and snapped the present one up soon as i slid underneath it, looked at a 04 plate 100 series a litte before i brought the present 120 and shoved me mitt straight though a box section underneath, mint my backside.

Like to say i'll try chain lube, but seeing as i have two full 4 litre bottles of ACF50 in the garage, there's a good chance i'll be past caring (probably past a lot of other things too) by the time they're used up.

Dunno if its thick or sticky enough for rustproofing but Smith and Allan sell 5 litre bottle of chain lube for £15 or so, which has to be among the cheapest around.

Just out of interest i drove car transporters for many years, and aerosol chain lube we used a lot of to keep the duplex deck lifting chains lubed up as well as the large screws that some transporter bodies used for deck lifting and decks sliders, also lubed the ratchets with the same stuff...well i did cos i like working with machinery that works smoothly and precisely not the rusted neglected crap that sadly many others took no pride in.

They started getting us Morris Oils chain lube, it proved too sticky for ratchet lubing, effectively glueing the blinking things up, but it also proved resilient to the weather in use re screws/chains, i could kick meself now that i never thought of the rust proofing potential there, might be worth an experiment if someone fancies having a go.
I should really try a home experiment, sheets of unpainted steel coated with the various products then left out in all weathers, i'll give that some thought.
 

Shayne

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What i'm seeing here is the Krown principal applied to alternative products which begs the question why not just use Krown when it was actually developed for this very purpose ?
 
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David

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What i'm seeing here is the Krown principal applied to alternative products which begs the question why not just use Krown when it was actually developed for this very purpose ?
I'm more than happy with the Krown treatments on both my trucks, and for around 300 quid I'm not going to be rolling about under a truck and making a mess in my workshop
 

AndycruiserguyLomas

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Jud, just to consider, the chain lube you have mentioned might not be sticky enough if its not for motorbike chains specifically. The stuff we have at work for forklift chains is nothing like the stuff that sticks on a motorbike chain wizzing around god knows how fast.
 

Juddian

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Jud, just to consider, the chain lube you have mentioned might not be sticky enough if its not for motorbike chains specifically. The stuff we have at work for forklift chains is nothing like the stuff that sticks on a motorbike chain wizzing around god knows how fast.

Good point that, wonder if the Morris' CL was meant for motorcycle chains.
 

qbartx

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There is so much choice of products these days it begs the question...do you really want to be pissing around with rustproofing your car every year? It's false economy. Do the job once and properly, steam clean it with proper alkaline tfr, remove any loose rust, sand everything down and apply corroless/buzzweld primer and top coat, or even use good 2k epoxy as top, spray cavities with dinitrol wax and forget about it for 10 years.
 

Mike M

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I'm using lanoguard to keep on top of mine. I originally had someone dinitrol the cruiser as it was a fresh import but loads of bits try to corrode. I was topping it up with wax oil but now I spray everything with the lanoguard, props, leaf springs , any exposed bolt or threads and over the top of the dinitrol. Apart from initially smelling abit sheepy, it seems to work well.
 

Towpack

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Going back to the late 60's, when cars really did have a rust problem, a neighbour of ours used to plaster the underneath of his car with old engine oil. His driveway was an environmental disaster but his car always looked immaculate. I remember him getting a 2nd hand Vauxhall Viscount around 1968 which he still had and looked as good as new when we moved house in 1977.
 

Juddian

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Going back to the late 60's, when cars really did have a rust problem, a neighbour of ours used to plaster the underneath of his car with old engine oil. His driveway was an environmental disaster but his car always looked immaculate. I remember him getting a 2nd hand Vauxhall Viscount around 1968 which he still had and looked as good as new when we moved house in 1977.

That's triggered a memory, one of my late cousins bought a new Vauxhall Viva HB, and set about painting and pumping inside wings and cavities the best part of a 45 gallon drum of tractor grease he used on the farm, it was hell to work on, looked a leafy filthy mess under the bonnet but it saw him out, wouldn't be surpised if its now a cherished classic somewhere.

Interesting learning about all these other products and methods, i'd do things differently to my current method if i bought a new (won't happen) or spotless grey import motor, giving a clean sheet to start with.
 

Juddian

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There is so much choice of products these days it begs the question...do you really want to be pissing around with rustproofing your car every year? It's false economy. Do the job once and properly, steam clean it with proper alkaline tfr, remove any loose rust, sand everything down and apply corroless/buzzweld primer and top coat, or even use good 2k epoxy as top, spray cavities with dinitrol wax and forget about it for 10 years.

Most interesting, i'd like to see one that had exactly that process done some years ago and have a look around it now.

The issue in this country is the annual road salting fetish, the further north the car lives the worse the problem.

Had Toyota galvanised the chassis at production and done something about protecting the exposed sills our 120's would have been one of the most corrosion resistant vehicles ever made and this thread would be unecessary.
 

Juddian

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Just been looking up Lanoguard, Krown and Corrosion Block, Krown seems to be the most affordable.
Though i accept you can't go by price alone, those more expensive products may well be better in the long term.

Then i looked up standard waterproof grease, that's much cheaper from several suppliers circa £35 for 12.5kg, would probably make a good covering product for wiping onto chassis if they are past rubbing down and painting but not yet likely to need welding, quite sure those of us into this lark will be welcomed with open arms by the welder chap if and when the time comes.

I really will have to get an experiment going here on sheet steel, also including the odd spraying with salty water.

Just to re-iterate, for those wishing to inject inside cavities, by far the best probes and nozzles have been found on Bilt Hamber's cavity waxe aerosols so far (possibly worth buying a few of those alone even if you prefer another actual product), though this won't be of concern to those who have compressor and spraying equipment to hand, who can take advantage of buying bulk packs.
 

chapel gate

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Going back to the late 60's, when cars really did have a rust problem, a neighbour of ours used to plaster the underneath of his car with old engine oil. His driveway was an environmental disaster but his car always looked immaculate. I remember him getting a 2nd hand Vauxhall Viscount around 1968 which he still had and looked as good as new when we moved house in 1977.
It's still done around here.
"you don't get rust where there's an oil leak" is the line.
Hard to argue with really.
The "system" trys to put us off by saying used engine oil is corrosive...
 

Mike M

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Search for Roothy on YouTube regarding the sheep Juice protection as I call it lol. He uses lanotec on his 40's.
I can only describe lanoguard as like having a carnuba wax coating on underneath, the water beading including muddy water is unreal.
 

Juddian

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This bloke's always worth a watch, see underneath when he lifts it.


Looked up Roothy by the way MikeM, and yes whilst he undoubtedly knows his stuff and the Lanolin works for Oz, British weather is different in that the roads are wet and salt is an issue for months on end during the cold spell when the underbody seldom dries off at all, so i wonder if it would be so effective here.

Interesting though, do you use it MikeM and is it doing all you would expect?

Do agree with Roothy that washing the salt off is the first line of defence, that's where most new buyers of vehicles like ours in Britain fail, they might keep the topside cleanish, but seldom does any bugger who can afford these vehicles new bother with undeneath.
 
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tony rodaway

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I bought 10 ltrs of white vinigar poured 5ltrs into a pressurised 5 ltr bottle with spray gun and sprayed all unerneath the car.
Lert to soak for few days and jet washed off and bought 6 spray tins of tetrocyl and just sprayed it over all the rust parts and its good for the places you can,t reach.
It is supposed to leave a wax like finish.

6 tins ebay = £19.00
2×5ltr tubs white vinigar amazon £9.99
5ltr spray bottle pressurised with gun =£7.99 the range superstore.

ONLY USED 5LTRS WHITE VINIGAR AS WELL ENOUGH
Used all the paint as that was its sole purpose.
Washed pressure bottle out and reused for garden weed killer.
Cheap and easy job.
 
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