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Wheel alignment on an 80

G

Guest

Guest
A while back I took my 80 in to get the tracking done and the local
tyre shop charged me ?45 to hook it up to their computerised system to
tell me it was out, however because the tie rod ends were a little too
stiff for them they couldn't adjust it without replacing the tie rod
ends and then testing again!
Anyway, looking through the LCool site I found a very handy guide to
checking and changing the alignment yourself - see
http://tinyurl.com/7smu2
It is actually a lot easier to do with the front tyres just off the
ground and using a spirit level to make sure that the measurements are
taken roughly 180 degrees to each other.
OK, it might not be as accurate as the computerised system, but
certainly good enough and it means that you can spend time loosening up
the tie rod ends in your own time.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
A while back I took my 80 in to get the tracking done and the local
tyre shop charged me ?45 to hook it up to their computerised system to
tell me it was out, however because the tie rod ends were a little too
stiff for them they couldn't adjust it without replacing the tie rod
ends and then testing again!
Anyway, looking through the LCool site I found a very handy guide to
checking and changing the alignment yourself - see
http://tinyurl.com/7smu2
It is actually a lot easier to do with the front tyres just off the
ground and using a spirit level to make sure that the measurements are
taken roughly 180 degrees to each other.
OK, it might not be as accurate as the computerised system, but
certainly good enough and it means that you can spend time loosening up
the tie rod ends in your own time.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
This is a crude way of checking tracking, however mistakes are easily made,
using a tracking guage of any type is far more accurate than a ruler and
chalk, a piece of string or even a telescopic rod of some description. If
people have the ability to free off their own rod ends then that will
certainly save workshop time, I know my guys have seized track rod ends,
very common on Land Rovers, always reassemble with copper slip.
The link mentions that castor angle cannot be adjusted, if your Land Cruiser
has been lifted then the castor angle will be altered and to retain the
straight ahead stability and self centering out of corners the castor angle
will need to be restored. This can be done by eccentric bushes (OME or
Terrafirma(available jan 06)Frogs Island 4x4)or if the vehicle is lifted
over 3 inches use castor plates.
Ed
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed]
[mailto:[Email address removed]]On Behalf Of Julian Voelcker
Sent: 14 November 2005 12:01
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: [ELCO] Wheel alignment on an 80
A while back I took my 80 in to get the tracking done and the local
tyre shop charged me ?45 to hook it up to their computerised system to
tell me it was out, however because the tie rod ends were a little too
stiff for them they couldn't adjust it without replacing the tie rod
ends and then testing again!
Anyway, looking through the LCool site I found a very handy guide to
checking and changing the alignment yourself - see
http://tinyurl.com/7smu2
It is actually a lot easier to do with the front tyres just off the
ground and using a spirit level to make sure that the measurements are
taken roughly 180 degrees to each other.
OK, it might not be as accurate as the computerised system, but
certainly good enough and it means that you can spend time loosening up
the tie rod ends in your own time.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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