African Outback Roof Rack for 80 series for sale

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Guest

Guest
Hi,
As part of my clear out I am also selling my African Outback Roof Rack.
It's a 2.1 x 1.3m aluminium rack which I bought for our trip to
Morocco, but am about to finally upgrade to a 100 and want a longer
rack so am willing to part with this one.
It is a great rack and more than strong enough for overlanding trips
without being too over the top and heavy like some I have seen.
To quote the TBR website:
African Outback roof racks are made of aluminium. Racks are acid
treated, powder coated and finished with clear lacquer for maximum
protection. Optional bolt on top rail system. Computer designed
extrusions for maximum strength and minimum weight. The "slide in" nut
system allows for easy fitment of many bolt on accessories.
You can read more about them if you go to the TBR site
(http://www.tbruk.com) and then follow the links to Toyota/80
series/Roof racks.
I don't have any of the side rails, but these can be purchased
seperately, however I do have a shower curtain that clips on the side
as well as a spade and spade holder to go with it. These were all
purchased from TBR back in March so you can check out the prices from
there.
Interested in a quick sale so open to cash offers.
If interested please call on 01285 821712 or drop me a line off list.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

Guest
Julian
I would be interested in buying it but not at the price you will ask for
it - I do need to replace mine - and you've probably read the email when I
said I want to replace mine - hit me off-list if you want to negotiate.
Renate
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed]
[mailto:[Email address removed]]On Behalf Of Julian Voelcker
Sent: 27 July 2007 17:43
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: [ELCO] African Outback Roof Rack for 80 series for sale
Hi,
As part of my clear out I am also selling my African Outback Roof Rack.
It's a 2.1 x 1.3m aluminium rack which I bought for our trip to
Morocco, but am about to finally upgrade to a 100 and want a longer
rack so am willing to part with this one.
It is a great rack and more than strong enough for overlanding trips
without being too over the top and heavy like some I have seen.
To quote the TBR website:
African Outback roof racks are made of aluminium. Racks are acid
treated, powder coated and finished with clear lacquer for maximum
protection. Optional bolt on top rail system. Computer designed
extrusions for maximum strength and minimum weight. The "slide in" nut
system allows for easy fitment of many bolt on accessories.
You can read more about them if you go to the TBR site
(http://www.tbruk.com) and then follow the links to Toyota/80
series/Roof racks.
I don't have any of the side rails, but these can be purchased
seperately, however I do have a shower curtain that clips on the side
as well as a spade and spade holder to go with it. These were all
purchased from TBR back in March so you can check out the prices from
there.
Interested in a quick sale so open to cash offers.
If interested please call on 01285 821712 or drop me a line off list.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi Renate,
I guess so. You will struggle to get change from ?550 for a new aluminium
rack for an 80 series, many are ?700+.
Additionally, second hand overlanding kit is very scarce so as long as it
is still as functional as it was when it was new, the price doesn't drop
much (unlike fully kitted out vehicles which drop like a stone in price).
If anyone here ever wants to sell a fully kitted vehicle, you will get a
far better return if you strip all the goodies off and sell them
seperately.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Julian
Re> however I do have a shower curtain that clips on the side as well
as a spade and spade holder to go with it.
What type of a shower system did you have - old fashioned galvanized
bucket with holes in it?
I'm trying to figure what type of shower system to run with for Africa
- likely to be home made effort - water consumption could be an issue
but I reckon its a must have.
Re> spade and spade holder to go with it.
What size spade is it? - Some of them are a bit small and dinky - ideal
if parachuting behind enemy lines into France but not much use for
digging the cruiser out of a hole? - I was going to bolt a big shovel to
the front bumper.
Thanks
Niall
PS - did you get the exhaust jack out of its wrapper yet?
PPS - might take that shower curtain off you if you haven't flogged it
already?
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi Niall,
In the end we never used the shower curtan because we regularly used
campsites with shower facilities.
For washing when wild camping we had two 20litre solar showers - wonderful
things when it's sunny. I used bungies to tie them onto the bonnet, they
bounced about a bit but it worked better than on the roof where they
bounced around a lot more. You also get some residual heat from the
engine warming them up.
If you have good sun they can get too hot, so be warned!
They are very cheap, although it is best to try to find ones that have
decent screw in tops and also ones where the shower hose can't slip off
too easily. We had two different types and they both leaked a bit from
the filling hole and one had a shower hose that had a tendancy to drop
off.
Also, try to find ones with suitable holes for tieing down - ours just had
holes where the carry handle was - for strapping down on a moving vehicle
you ideally need them with holes in each corner.
Next time around I would go the route of a second water tank and a heat
exchanger. It is a bit of a luxury, but we had young children with us who
didn't enjoy washing in cold water - also it's a pain to wash up pots and
plates in cold water.
The last thing you want it to be boiling water to wash in - it can consume
a lot of gas.
On a side note, do try your cooking kit out a few times before you leave -
we took a small cooker and 8 spare cans of gas. We had used it a few
times when we had power cuts at home, but never in anger - when out in
Morocco we ran out of the cans within about 5 days - boiling water for
things like pasta chews up a lot of gas.
Also make sure you have a cooker with good side protection from wind - I
don't think we ever had a still day in Morocco!
I have a small fold up one along the lines you are hinting at as well as a
solid metal one.
If I was just going to use it in the desert, I would go to an agricultural
supplier and buy a grain shovel - these tend to have a wooden handle and
aluminium blade and are a fraction of the weight of the one I have and are
ideal for sand or snow.
However you are going to need it for sand and mud so I would go for
something more substantial. Also make sure that it has flat edges on the
top side of the blade so that you don't slice your foot up if you have to
stand on it to push it into the ground.
Again, go into your local agricultural suppliers and see what they have to
offer.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

Guest
Alright Julian
Re > solar showers
Great idea and good lessons learned advise - thanks.
Re > Next time around I would go the route of a second water tank and a
heat
exchanger.
I was thinking of that option and still researching costs installation.
I've removed the back seats so have a fair amount of space for a second
tank. I think weight is the thing that will dictate the decision. I have
a ground plough/anchor that weighs 25KG and its a pig to use its so
heavy. Weight is a big concern
The solar showers can be filled up on the go and if really necessary -
filtered. I like this idea the more I think of it.
Re > On a side note, do try your cooking kit out a few times before you
leave - we took a small cooker and 8 spare cans of gas.
I see what you mean there. I'm looking at taking twin 10KG bottles
supposedly the ones with din fittings can be easily filled in most
places in Africa - I saw this morning that TBR do some handy brackets
for roof racks that can be padlocked in place - will be getting 1 of
these.
Re > Shovels
Agreed - you can never have enough shovels - Digging is an offical
sport here in Ireland! The grain shovels can be a bit flymsie in mud.
The builders shovel backed up with the military fold-up could be the way
to go.
Thanks
Niall
HDJ 80 in Prep
 
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Hello guys,
Here's my 2p worth of comments:
While this sounds like a great idea on paper, I'll have yet to find a
car based shower really indispensable, which I can's say about wet
wipes.
IMHO, for overlanding the ground anchor is yet another great idea on
paper. It could be fantastic for solo travel, but for reasons better
than proving something to oneself, overlanding is safer and more fun
in a small group. At 25kg dead weight, the ground anchor is more like
a ballast. I'd personally pack a bigger fridge and fill it with beer
:)
I'd add to it a thread adapter fitted with barbed hose fittings in
different sizes. I don't think DIN means anything at all in Africa,
but they do use various plumbing thread sizes and the bottles can be
refilled from various sources.
An aluminium shovel (be it for grain or snow) is great for sand,
especially if fitted on a short handle, but a pair of hands works just
as well. Also, a small shovel comes very handy as a toilet instrument.
I never had a chance to use a big shovel, though.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80 (auto)
 
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Roman
2p goes a long way down there.
Re ground anchor.
As it happens I rekon I'll be solo for 2 of my planned 4 months - so
could be handy butr I like the beer idea better:) . I do intend to team
up with other nutters on the way for fun and safety.
Good lessons learned on the gas fittings - thanks
Re Using a big Shovel
You're missing out bud!
Niall
 
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Hi Roman,
We were travelling with 3 children, next time it will be four. It's
amazing how your priorities change travelling with children. Just the
ability to have hot/warm water on demand makes life a little more bearable.
You can only carry so many wet wipes and also they contribute to more
litter to get rid of.
Don't get me wrong, the solar showers were an absolute boon (bar the
drawbacks already mentioned), however if you are on the move they don't
heat up so well on a moving vehicle unless sheltered from the wind and it
wasn't sunny everyday.
For our next trip I want to go for a built in water tank (I'm considering
one of the combinations tanks 50l water, 120l fuel) and a filter for
drinking water - I don't wan't to end up with a boot full of either full or
empty water bottles as we did in Morocco.
I'll also put in a heat exhanger and then a smaller water tank to store the
hot water in so that it can be heated up whilst we are on the move and
should stay suitably hot for washing at the end of the day.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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