Baseline service of new vehicle.

G

Guest

Guest
Hi Chris,
OK for a baseline service where you don't have any history on your new
purchase, I would recommend the following:
Change the engine oil and filter.
Change air filter and fuel filter.
If an auto drain as much gearboox oil and replenish with what you
managed to drain out - usually 4-7 litres
If a manual just change the oil.
Strip down the front knuckles to inspect CVs, wheel bearings and swivel
bearings and then repack with new grease (moly based for CV, lithium
only based for wheel bearings) - be prepared to replace bearings/CVs on
the way - no point putting knackered ones back in although they can
take a hell of a lot of hammering, even when worn. Also bear in mind
dealers don't touch these during regular services. Ideally you should
doo the strip down, check and repack of the CVs and all wheel bearings
every 20-30k miles - if you do this they should last 100k miles +.
Also strip down the rear wheel bearings and repack as above.
Change the diff oils during the above.
Probably change the brake pads at the same time - well check them at
the same time as above - you can also check the condition of the disks
and calipers.
Flush through the brake fluid.
Flush the radiator and refill with Toyota red coolant. You may want to
use a chemical flush.
Remove the prop shafts, check the UJs and regrease, clean the grease
from the splined shaft and reapply by hand as opposed to via the grease
nipple.
When draining any of the oils above it gives you a good opportunity to
inspect the oils, checking for deposits on the drain plugs (where
magnetic ones are fitted) as well as checking the colour and smell.
You may see things like sludge coming out of the diffs where there has
been water ingress or grease from the CVs (more common), with autos if
the gearbox oil isn't changed regularly enough it may smell burnt from
overheating.
Personally unless there is history to the contrary, if prepping a new
car for a long overlanding trip I would change the CVs and all wheel
and swivel bearings purely for peace of mind.
Having said that I have seen 80s clock up several thousand miles with
no grease in the CVs or wheel bearings, collapsed swivel bearings,
clicking CVs, etc - they are extremely strong parts.
Also, if you have a 12 valve 80 series with 100,000 miles + on it I
would change out the Big End Bearings. The various threads around on
this recommend changing them every 100,000 miles. Having done some on
80s around the 150,000-200,000 miles mark they have all had quite
serious pitting on at least two sets of bearings. OK it is difficult
to know how long the pitting had been there and how much longer the
engines would have lasted, however you need to bear in mind when they
do go, they go with a bang.
Also on the engine front I would be inclined to check the valve gaps as
well as possibly get the injectors and fuel injection pump
tested/serviced - ideally the valves should be checked every 30k miles
and the IP side of things checked every 100k miles. Fortunately I have
found a good firm in Swindon who can do it very reasonably.
Hope that helps.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Chris,
OK for a baseline service where you don't have any history on your new
purchase, I would recommend the following:
Change the engine oil and filter.
Change air filter and fuel filter.
If an auto drain as much gearboox oil and replenish with what you
managed to drain out - usually 4-7 litres
If a manual just change the oil.
Strip down the front knuckles to inspect CVs, wheel bearings and swivel
bearings and then repack with new grease (moly based for CV, lithium
only based for wheel bearings) - be prepared to replace bearings/CVs on
the way - no point putting knackered ones back in although they can
take a hell of a lot of hammering, even when worn. Also bear in mind
dealers don't touch these during regular services. Ideally you should
doo the strip down, check and repack of the CVs and all wheel bearings
every 20-30k miles - if you do this they should last 100k miles +.
Also strip down the rear wheel bearings and repack as above.
Change the diff oils during the above.
Probably change the brake pads at the same time - well check them at
the same time as above - you can also check the condition of the disks
and calipers.
Flush through the brake fluid.
Flush the radiator and refill with Toyota red coolant. You may want to
use a chemical flush.
Remove the prop shafts, check the UJs and regrease, clean the grease
from the splined shaft and reapply by hand as opposed to via the grease
nipple.
When draining any of the oils above it gives you a good opportunity to
inspect the oils, checking for deposits on the drain plugs (where
magnetic ones are fitted) as well as checking the colour and smell.
You may see things like sludge coming out of the diffs where there has
been water ingress or grease from the CVs (more common), with autos if
the gearbox oil isn't changed regularly enough it may smell burnt from
overheating.
Personally unless there is history to the contrary, if prepping a new
car for a long overlanding trip I would change the CVs and all wheel
and swivel bearings purely for peace of mind.
Having said that I have seen 80s clock up several thousand miles with
no grease in the CVs or wheel bearings, collapsed swivel bearings,
clicking CVs, etc - they are extremely strong parts.
Also, if you have a 12 valve 80 series with 100,000 miles + on it I
would change out the Big End Bearings. The various threads around on
this recommend changing them every 100,000 miles. Having done some on
80s around the 150,000-200,000 miles mark they have all had quite
serious pitting on at least two sets of bearings. OK it is difficult
to know how long the pitting had been there and how much longer the
engines would have lasted, however you need to bear in mind when they
do go, they go with a bang.
Also on the engine front I would be inclined to check the valve gaps as
well as possibly get the injectors and fuel injection pump
tested/serviced - ideally the valves should be checked every 30k miles
and the IP side of things checked every 100k miles. Fortunately I have
found a good firm in Swindon who can do it very reasonably.
Hope that helps.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
07971 540 362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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