Brass drift. Used to loosen cone washers.

G

Guest

Guest
Guys

Quick stupid question before I buy another wrong tool for the job....

Why do you use a brass drift/hammer to loosen the cone washers when removing the hub assembly. I'm assuming so you don't break anything with a claw or lump hammer

I can't seem to get one - would a copper faced or raw hide faced hammer do the trick just as well.....

Any insight appreciated

Ta

Niall

HDJ80 on stilts
 
G

Guest

Guest
Niall,
Why not just getting a five inch piece of brass rod from a metal
merchant? It will work out cheaper than a raw hide faced hammer :)
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 4/12/07, Niall Sommers <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
Roman

Re - Why not just getting a five inch piece of brass rod from a metal
merchant?

Sensible approach alright.

Cheers

Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Its often the case that when you go to a tool supplier and ask for
these, they don't know what you are talking about as they are a bit
of an 'old fashioned engineer's' tool. Finding a place that sells
suitable bits of brass is also not so easy if you are not in a large city.
My brass drift is a length of 3/8 solid brass curtain rail which is
just right. Buying it by the half metre means that I have a selection
of bits of various lengths. These brass curtain rails can be easily
obtained from a canal boat chandlery. Or if one is not handy then the
better curtain accessory shops also sell them. Usually the type of
shop owned by a family or specialist chain, not B&Q. (But beware of
brass anodised aluminium, or brassed steel lookalikes).
For our members residing on the continent, if you are lucky enough to
have a nearby branch of the wonderful OBI DIY chain then you will be
in luck. Not only do OBI sell a terrific range of tools which may
include brass drifts, they certainly sell brass rod in various
diameters. In fact they have a whole range of extrusions and profiles
in brass and aluminium. If only they had a presence in the UK :o(
Cheers
Jon
Tring,Herts
'92 HZJ80 ex UN Bosnia surplus
 
Don't like the adverts? Remove them by becoming a supporting member.   Click here
G

Guest

Guest
Thanks Guys for the input

Managed to pop them out last nite with lump of hard plastic off a plastic fence post

Now the real fun starts!

Cheers
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Don't worry it not that hard. It is very logical take apart and
reassembles these items at there is no tricks or special tools required
.but make sure you don't just pack the CV with grease push a load in to
the dish as well to keep the cv semi toped up with grease . finally
don't over tighten the bearings .
Yours
Ray
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Niall Sommers
Sent: 13 April 2007 11:39
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Brass drift. Used to loosen cone washers.
Thanks Guys for the input
Managed to pop them out last nite with lump of hard plastic off a
plastic fence post
Now the real fun starts!
Cheers
Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Sound Ray

Re: ...it not that hard...

New torque wrench in the post so the bearings should be OK....

I'm still a bit stumped about how to measure the the bearing preload with a tension spring - or generally what that means and how it's done but will no doubt be on about that next week....

Cheers

Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
I don=92t use any thing but a big box socket and arm. Just tighten the 1
nut and keep spinning the when to feel the resistance. Also you may need
to tap the hub with a mallet once you have tightened the nut to seat it
a bit more. But generally get it nice and tight then back the nut off =BC
to a 3rd of a turn and you should be ok. Then after you have used the
car check it for play but should be ok. It is just one of those thongs
you learn to get a feel of when you do it.

Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Niall Sommers
Sent: 13 April 2007 12:21
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Brass drift. Used to loosen cone washers.

Sound Ray

Re: ...it not that hard...

New torque wrench in the post so the bearings should be OK....

I'm still a bit stumped about how to measure the the bearing preload
with a tension spring - or generally what that means and how it's done
but will no doubt be on about that next week....

Cheers

Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Niall
A really nice and patient guy MIck in Mayo from the list, maybe gone now or very quiet, or maybe I scarred him off, but he showed me how to tackle the bearings just with the feel of the rotating hub and adjusting as he felt needed.
He did tell me a few times its all down to practice but if you are only doing one or two hubs every few years its quite hard to get that practice in and then remembering i find is the most difficult part.
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hey Ray
I had all new bearings installed by Toy and two of the wheels have a fair bit of movement in them, so it has to go back. So much for their understanding of bearings.
They adjusted my handbrake yesterday and had to bring it back to them this morning because of one side heating up where the shoes were too tight.
Had my lights adjusted by them before it went for a test and it failed because of the lights.
So much for their understanding of lights and handbrakes, but I will get there.
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
G

Guest

Guest
Speaking from experience I know how you feel. But that is the gamble we
take very day trusting someone with your stuff . if you have time plus
the skill do it your self it is very rewarding once you have done it and
good on the old pocket . equally if you have a good mechanic you know
keep with him but from time to time we all make mistakes .that's is just
part of life
Ray
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of John Byrne
Sent: 13 April 2007 12:45
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Brass drift. Used to loosen cone washers.
Hey Ray
I had all new bearings installed by Toy and two of the wheels have a
fair bit of movement in them, so it has to go back. So much for their
understanding of bearings.
They adjusted my handbrake yesterday and had to bring it back to them
this morning because of one side heating up where the shoes were too
tight.
Had my lights adjusted by them before it went for a test and it failed
because of the lights.
So much for their understanding of lights and handbrakes, but I will
get there.
john 92HDJ 80 1HDT
 
G

Guest

Guest
I usually use a torque wrench but also gauge it by feel, as Ray said the
danger is the bearing is not seated and you just throw a torque wrench on it
will show it as correct but after 50 miles might be slack, that isn=92t too
bad if you do you own work and check it (good practice anyway).

Preload on the knuckle =96 bet most people go by feel but it is quite simple
to use a spring balance =96 I think there was a good write up for the knuckles
HYPERLINK "http://www.birfield.com"www.birfield.com but that is down a the
moment.

Malcolm Bagley
Stafford UK
FJ45 '75 & FJ45 '76

From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Ray Dadd
Sent: 13 April 2007 12:36
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: RE: [ELCO] Brass drift. Used to loosen cone washers.

I don=92t use any thing but a big box socket and arm. Just tighten the 1 nut
and keep spinning the when to feel the resistance. Also you may need to tap
the hub with a mallet once you have tightened the nut to seat it a bit more.
But generally get it nice and tight then back the nut off =BC to a 3rd of a
turn and you should be ok. Then after you have used the car check it for
play but should be ok. It is just one of those thongs you learn to get a
feel of when you do it.

Ray

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.2.0/757 - Release Date: 11/04/2007
17:14
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Niall,
I have a brass drift, but still prefer using my brass faced hammer -
much quickker and less fiddly.
What ever you do don't use a normal hammer, it doesn't take mmuch to
bugger up the threads.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks