(Chat) Diff locks

G

Guest

Guest
Anthony
On my truck which has ABS, as originally supplied:
* the centre diff lock (CDL) was engaged when you selected low ratio, there was no manual switch.
* the rear diff lock could only be engaged if the centre was engaged
* the front diff lock could also only be engaged if the centre was engaged & rear selected (but not necessarily engaged).
Therefore diff locks were only available in low range and, worse still, using low range enforced the selection of the CDL.
This was standard for ABS fitted vehicles, and engaging the CDL inhibits the ABS system. Those without ABS had a manual CDL switch, and I think this could be engaged in either high or low ratios, although the front & rear diff-locks followed the logic above.
I, like many people, have disconnected the "engage CDL when in low range" switch on the transfer case and have replaced it with a manual CDL switch on the dash - as for non-ABS equipped vehicles. On a manual gearbox this is sufficient, but on an auto you may have to fiddle with the "pin 7 mod" to get correct shift vs speed behaviour.
So I can now engage the difflocks in high, low or neutral. Engaging the CDL still inhibits the ABS, and the front and rear diff locks can still only be engaged when the centre has locked up. Also if I have front & rear locked up and I switch off the CDL then the front and rear locksalso disengage, regardless of their switch setting.
As far as I know there is no way of "locking the locks on in high range" in a standard (ABS equipped) vehicle. (And I, for one, would hate to try it at any speed!)
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
>
>
> There seems to be some differences concerning how the axle locks will operate.
>
>
> Some say that in order to operate them the low ratio need to be engaged.
>
> Others say the axle locks can be engaged regardless of whether the low ratio is engaged or not.
>
> Some say that to operate the axle locks in high range the CDL must be engaged firsts.
>
Some say that to engage the axle locks in high range they must be engaged in low first and then with out switching them off high can be engaged and they will remain o
>
>
>
I would like a poll to see what the consensus is as across the ELCO forum as across the pond there is a variety of strong opinions of how they are engaged. I think that I have covered the list of options, what do you thin
>
>
>
> Anthony Graham
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Doh!
I forgot to add that I don't necessarily need to be in Low Ratio to do
this, for central diff, that is, but through choice I put it into
neutral first, then engage low ratio, then central diff can be engaged
easily. I do find though, that in low gear anyway (not low range) I can
engage CDL.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 02:20pm >>>
Anthony
On my truck which has ABS, as originally supplied: the centre diff lock
(CDL) was engaged when you selected low ratio, there was no manual
switch.the rear diff lock could only be engaged if the centre was
engagedthe front diff lock could also only be engaged if the centre was
engaged & rear selected (but not necessarily engaged).Therefore diff
locks were only available in low range and, worse still, using low range
enforced the selection of the CDL.
This was standard for ABS fitted vehicles, and engaging the CDL
inhibits the ABS system. Those without ABS had a manual CDL switch, and
I think this could be engaged in either high or low ratios, although the
front & rear diff-locks followed the logic above.
I, like many people, have disconnected the "engage CDL when in low
range" switch on the transfer case and have replaced it with a manual
CDL switch on the dash - as for non-ABS equipped vehicles. On a manual
gearbox this is sufficient, but on an auto you may have to fiddle with
the "pin 7 mod" to get correct shift vs speed behaviour.
So I can now engage the difflocks in high, low or neutral. Engaging
the CDL still inhibits the ABS, and the front and rear diff locks can
still only be engaged when the centre has locked up. Also if I have
front & rear locked up and I switch off the CDL then the front and rear
locksalso disengage, regardless of their switch setting.
As far as I know there is no way of "locking the locks on in high
range" in a standard (ABS equipped) vehicle. (And I, for one, would hate
to try it at any speed!)
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
st1:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) }There seems to be some
differences concerning how the axle locks will operate.
Some say that in order to operate them the low ratio need to be
engaged. Others say the axle locks can be engaged regardless of whether
the low ratio is engaged or not. Some say that to operate the axle locks
in high range the CDL must be engaged firsts. Some say that to engage
the axle locks in high range they must be engaged in low first and then
with out switching them off high can be engaged and they will remain on.
I would like a poll to see what the consensus is as across the ELCO
forum as across the pond there is a variety of strong opinions of how
they are engaged. I think that I have covered the list of options, what
do you think! Anthony Graham
 
G

Guest

Guest
Christopher,
Thank you for your reply this is much as I have thought.
Mine has ABS and had a CDL switch when I bought it but I am having problems
with mine at present so can not test to see how mine works as yet. I expect
them to work in the same sequence as yours. I have not done the seven pin
mod but I expect I will although there is an alternative way to achieve the
same effect of allowing low to be engaged without the CDL engaging. I also
do not like the shift pattern in low though it can have a function but
ideally would like to choose what pattern I have for the circumstances.
Some people appear to have found an easy way to engage the axle locks if
they normally are not available in high, that is to engage them in low first
then shift into high and they will stay on unless switched off. There are
times when I would find this useful but do appreciate the dangers, the
G-wagon allows you the choice of what ever sequence you like.
The reason for me starting the thread is that some find it impossible to
engage the axle locks in high, and others have no problems, and yet an other
group has to cheat as it were to achieve a locked axle in high.
It probably sounds confusing the way I have explained things but would still
like to here from others to see if there are differences in the UK
Anthony
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Christopher Bell
Sent: 28 January 2005 14:21
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] (Chat) Diff locks
Anthony
On my truck which has ABS, as originally supplied:
* the centre diff lock (CDL) was engaged when you selected low ratio,
there was no manual switch.
* the rear diff lock could only be engaged if the centre was engaged
* the front diff lock could also only be engaged if the centre was
engaged & rear selected (but not necessarily engaged).
Therefore diff locks were only available in low range and, worse still,
using low range enforced the selection of the CDL.
This was standard for ABS fitted vehicles, and engaging the CDL inhibits the
ABS system. Those without ABS had a manual CDL switch, and I think this
could be engaged in either high or low ratios, although the front & rear
diff-locks followed the logic above.
I, like many people, have disconnected the "engage CDL when in low range"
switch on the transfer case and have replaced it with a manual CDL switch on
the dash - as for non-ABS equipped vehicles. On a manual gearbox this is
sufficient, but on an auto you may have to fiddle with the "pin 7 mod" to
get correct shift vs speed behaviour.
So I can now engage the difflocks in high, low or neutral. Engaging the CDL
still inhibits the ABS, and the front and rear diff locks can still only be
engaged when the centre has locked up. Also if I have front & rear locked
up and I switch off the CDL then the front and rear locksalso disengage,
regardless of their switch setting.
As far as I know there is no way of "locking the locks on in high range" in
a standard (ABS equipped) vehicle. (And I, for one, would hate to try it at
any speed!)
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
There seems to be some differences concerning how the axle locks will
operate.
Some say that in order to operate them the low ratio need to be engaged.
Others say the axle locks can be engaged regardless of whether the low ratio
is engaged or not.
Some say that to operate the axle locks in high range the CDL must be
engaged firsts.
Some say that to engage the axle locks in high range they must be engaged in
low first and then with out switching them off high can be engaged and they
will remain on.
I would like a poll to see what the consensus is as across the ELCO forum as
across the pond there is a variety of strong opinions of how they are
engaged. I think that I have covered the list of options, what do you
think!
Anthony Graham
 
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks