observation of fine-balanced tuning for towing

G

Guest

Guest
Chris
I anticipated carrying heavy loads when planning the last african trip
so had heavy duty springs and shocks fitted - the upside is that they
also gave me an additional 2.5-3" lift.
I adjusted the headlight beams but I guess knowing what damage weight
can do to, especially at speed.
I secured all the heavy stuff, including 60+ ltrs of water right up to
the back of the folded down middle seat, as hard as I could, they still
worked loose.
I worked out that I was carrying half a tonne of stuff, most of this
was food, water and beast bits, and was accutely aware that my axles and
even the chasis might suffer as a consequence of desert dune driving. I
didn't fancy attaching a trailer, they are a serious liability in the
desert, and I came back thinking "next time, carry light!" and if this
meant more than two journeys then so be it.
I don't have any experience with trailers on my toyo but I know that it
takes ages to fine-tune for towing trailers and small caravans, and I
guess its the same for horse boxes. Not that I am the expert since I
aint, not by a long way.
Recently I saw a toyo 4x4 on the M4 with a hefty horse box - I've never
actually seen a horse box so finely tuned to being towed - the back of
the 4x4 was neither up nor down, nor was the horse box. So I guessed
they got the weight ratio pretty much aokay. When I overtook the toyo
and box I spend considerable time looking at how finely balanced
everything was. Usually I see them up ending a bit, or being so weighed
down at the back there is considerable chance for it all to go
pear-shaped. I don't know what the guy must have thought, me peering at
his bits and into the cab - a quick meeting of the eye resulted in me
giving the thumbs up and smiling, well, I couldn't do anything else - it
was a dark red 80 with grey trim, I think it was a K or an L
registration
So, just an observation, nothing important in that - well it made my
day, to see another 80 when all I tend to see these days is toyo surfs
with the front like an 80 but the back a surf.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 11:26am >>>
Julian Voelcker wrote:
> I would love to build a draw system for all the junk in the back,
but
> they are a pain when you need the full load space for fun tasks like
> shifting furniture.
Reading this, and the various threads about adding fitted kit to the
boot, I feel I should describe my experience of last week.
I had to travel to Yorkshire to clear out my father's house, and I
rented a 10'x6'x6' trailer to help to carry the stuff. On the way back
the trailer was laden, but in a well balanced way. However I had a lot
of heavy stuff in the back of the truck, mostly boxes of books, and the
headlight adjuster had to go down two clicks, which gives a measure of
the load on the rear axle.
At anything above 50mph the trailer was completely uncontrollable -
something I've never experienced before when towing the horses. Those
who have teased me (nicely) before about our equine activities will know
that I'm pretty experienced at hauling heavy loads, and 3 nags + trailer
are easily twice the weight of what I was pulling then.
So the moral is, I believe, that if you are going to add significant
permanent weight at the rear you really must think about upgrading the
springs, otherwise you may have stability problems when subsequently
towing - or possibly even solo at high speed.
Probably pretty obvious to all you experts, but it came as an
unpleasant shock to me - and Yorkshire is an awful long ride from Devon
at 50mph!
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi

A perfect balance is NOT what you want when towing a trailer Caravan,
horse box ,etc. You need a nose down force of 50-100 Kg=92s.

Rob

See HYPERLINK
"http://www.rmtrailers.co.uk/towing-tips.htm"http://www.rmtrailers.co.uk
/towing-tips.htm


-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Renate Haupt
Sent: 28 January 2005 11:51
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] observation of fine-balanced tuning for towing

Chris
I anticipated carrying heavy loads when planning the last african trip
so had heavy duty springs and shocks fitted - the upside is that they
also gave me an additional 2.5-3" lift.
I adjusted the headlight beams but I guess knowing what damage weight
can do to, especially at speed.
I secured all the heavy stuff, including 60+ ltrs of water right up to
the back of the folded down middle seat, as hard as I could, they still
worked loose.
I worked out that I was carrying half a tonne of stuff, most of this was
food, water and beast bits, and was accutely aware that my axles and
even the chasis might suffer as a consequence of desert dune driving. I
didn't fancy attaching a trailer, they are a serious liability in the
desert, and I came back thinking "next time, carry light!" and if this
meant more than two journeys then so be it.
I don't have any experience with trailers on my toyo but I know that it
takes ages to fine-tune for towing trailers and small caravans, and I
guess its the same for horse boxes. Not that I am the expert since I
aint, not by a long way.
Recently I saw a toyo 4x4 on the M4 with a hefty horse box - I've never
actually seen a horse box so finely tuned to being towed - the back of
the 4x4 was neither up nor down, nor was the horse box. So I guessed
they got the weight ratio pretty much aokay. When I overtook the toyo
and box I spend considerable time looking at how finely balanced
everything was. Usually I see them up ending a bit, or being so weighed
down at the back there is considerable chance for it all to go
pear-shaped. I don't know what the guy must have thought, me peering at
his bits and into the cab - a quick meeting of the eye resulted in me
giving the thumbs up and smiling, well, I couldn't do anything else - it
was a dark red 80 with grey trim, I think it was a K or an L
registration
So, just an observation, nothing important in that - well it made my
day, to see another 80 when all I tend to see these days is toyo surfs
with the front like an 80 but the back a surf.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 11:26am >>>
Julian Voelcker wrote:
> I would love to build a draw system for all the junk in the back, but
> they are a pain when you need the full load space for fun tasks like
> shifting furniture.
Reading this, and the various threads about adding fitted kit to the
boot, I feel I should describe my experience of last week.
I had to travel to Yorkshire to clear out my father's house, and I
rented a 10'x6'x6' trailer to help to carry the stuff. On the way back
the trailer was laden, but in a well balanced way. However I had a lot
of heavy stuff in the back of the truck, mostly boxes of books, and the
headlight adjuster had to go down two clicks, which gives a measure of
the load on the rear axle.
At anything above 50mph the trailer was completely uncontrollable -
something I've never experienced before when towing the horses. Those
who have teased me (nicely) before about our equine activities will know
that I'm pretty experienced at hauling heavy loads, and 3 nags + trailer
are easily twice the weight of what I was pulling then.
So the moral is, I believe, that if you are going to add significant
permanent weight at the rear you really must think about upgrading the
springs, otherwise you may have stability problems when subsequently
towing - or possibly even solo at high speed.
Probably pretty obvious to all you experts, but it came as an unpleasant
shock to me - and Yorkshire is an awful long ride from Devon at 50mph!
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT
--
European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
Further Info: HYPERLINK
"http://www.landcruisers.info/lists/"http://www.landcruisers.info/lists/
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G

Guest

Guest
rob
Sorry about this next sentence, Rob, As I said, balance is what it
seemed to be to me - it looked good, was efficient AND effective -
neither horse box nor car were at all stressing, both were very quiet
and I was close enough to see and hear if either was straining! to me
this is how it is supposed to be, so I'm tending to disagree with your
sentence - sorry.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 09:42pm >>>
Hi A perfect balance is NOT what you want when towing a trailer
Caravan, horse box ,etc. You need a nose down force of 50-100 Kg's. Rob
See http://www.rmtrailers.co.uk/towing-tips.htm -----Original
Message-----
From: [Email address removed]
[mailto:[Email address removed]] On Behalf Of Renate Haupt
Sent: 28 January 2005 11:51
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] observation of fine-balanced tuning for towing
Chris
I anticipated carrying heavy loads when planning the last african trip
so had heavy duty springs and shocks fitted - the upside is that they
also gave me an additional 2.5-3" lift.
I adjusted the headlight beams but I guess knowing what damage weight
can do to, especially at speed.
I secured all the heavy stuff, including 60+ ltrs of water right up to
the back of the folded down middle seat, as hard as I could, they still
worked loose.
I worked out that I was carrying half a tonne of stuff, most of this
was food, water and beast bits, and was accutely aware that my axles and
even the chasis might suffer as a consequence of desert dune driving. I
didn't fancy attaching a trailer, they are a serious liability in the
desert, and I came back thinking "next time, carry light!" and if this
meant more than two journeys then so be it.
I don't have any experience with trailers on my toyo but I know that it
takes ages to fine-tune for towing trailers and small caravans, and I
guess its the same for horse boxes. Not that I am the expert since I
aint, not by a long way.
Recently I saw a toyo 4x4 on the M4 with a hefty horse box - I've never
actually seen a horse box so finely tuned to being towed - the back of
the 4x4 was neither up nor down, nor was the horse box. So I guessed
they got the weight ratio pretty much aokay. When I overtook the toyo
and box I spend considerable time looking at how finely balanced
everything was. Usually I see them up ending a bit, or being so weighed
down at the back there is considerable chance for it all to go
pear-shaped. I don't know what the guy must have thought, me peering at
his bits and into the cab - a quick meeting of the eye resulted in me
giving the thumbs up and smiling, well, I couldn't do anything else - it
was a dark red 80 with grey trim, I think it was a K or an L
registration
So, just an observation, nothing important in that - well it made my
day, to see another 80 when all I tend to see these days is toyo surfs
with the front like an 80 but the back a surf.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 11:26am >>>
Julian Voelcker wrote:
> I would love to build a draw system for all the junk in the back,
but
> they are a pain when you need the full load space for fun tasks like
> shifting furniture.
Reading this, and the various threads about adding fitted kit to the
boot, I feel I should describe my experience of last week.
I had to travel to Yorkshire to clear out my father's house, and I
rented a 10'x6'x6' trailer to help to carry the stuff. On the way back
the trailer was laden, but in a well balanced way. However I had a lot
of heavy stuff in the back of the truck, mostly boxes of books, and the
headlight adjuster had to go down two clicks, which gives a measure of
the load on the rear axle.
At anything above 50mph the trailer was completely uncontrollable -
something I've never experienced before when towing the horses. Those
who have teased me (nicely) before about our equine activities will know
that I'm pretty experienced at hauling heavy loads, and 3 nags + trailer
are easily twice the weight of what I was pulling then.
So the moral is, I believe, that if you are going to add significant
permanent weight at the rear you really must think about upgrading the
springs, otherwise you may have stability problems when subsequently
towing - or possibly even solo at high speed.
Probably pretty obvious to all you experts, but it came as an
unpleasant shock to me - and Yorkshire is an awful long ride from Devon
at 50mph!
Christopher Bell
Devon, UK
1996 1HD-FT

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Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date: 26/01/2005
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G

Guest

Guest
I don't tow trailers or horse boxes, I don't have need to do this, all I
can say is that it looked and sounded okay to me, and if this is the
wrong deduction on my part about cruisers and horse boxes and trailers
then I stand corrected.
I didn't realise some people have hang ups about towing trailers or
horse boxes. It was just an innocent observation on my part, I wasn't
to know that this innocence on my part is so wrong.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/31/05 01:09pm >>>
Sorry Ranate, I have to jump in here, if you saw a car/trailer rig that
"looked good, was efficient AND effective" then I will guarantee that
the tailer had a nose weight of about 50 to 75kg. If a trailer
noseweight is significantly lighter than 50kg or so, the trailer is
very
difficult to control (swaying and badly affected by crosswinds) if it's
much heavier than that the car starts to get that "hang ass" look and
the car handling (and more importantly braking) are adversely
affected.
Sorry I had to jump in, but if you are ever going to tow a trailer,
please set the nose weight correctly.
Alan
P.S. This really only applies to "proper trailers", e.g horse boxes,
caravans, car transporters etc. Not the silly little wheelbarrow things
you get from Halfords - I'm not sure if the whole trailer weighs 75kg!
Renate Haupt wrote:
> rob
> Sorry about this next sentence, Rob, As I said, balance is what it
> seemed to be to me - it looked good, was efficient AND effective -
> neither horse box nor car were at all stressing, both were very
> quiet and I was close enough to see and hear if either was straining!
to
> me this is how it is supposed to be, so I'm tending to disagree with
> your sentence - sorry.
> Renate
>
> >>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 09:42pm >>>
>
> Hi
>
>
>
> A perfect balance is NOT what you want when towing a trailer Caravan,
> horse box ,etc. You need a nose down force of 50-100 Kg's.
>
>
>
> Rob
>
>
>
> See http://www.rmtrailers.co.uk/towing-tips.htm
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> *From:* [Email address removed]
> [mailto:[Email address removed]] *On Behalf Of *Renate Haupt
> *Sent:* 28 January 2005 11:51
> *To:* [Email address removed]
> *Subject:* Re: [ELCO] observation of fine-balanced tuning for towing
>
>
>
> Chris
>
> I anticipated carrying heavy loads when planning the last african
trip
> so had heavy duty springs and shocks fitted - the upside is that they
> also gave me an additional 2.5-3" lift.
>
> I adjusted the headlight beams but I guess knowing what damage
weight
> can do to, especially at speed.
>
> I secured all the heavy stuff, including 60+ ltrs of water right up
to
> the back of the folded down middle seat, as hard as I could, they
still
> worked loose.
>
> I worked out that I was carrying half a tonne of stuff, most of this
was
> food, water and beast bits, and was accutely aware that my axles and
> even the chasis might suffer as a consequence of desert dune driving.
I
> didn't fancy attaching a trailer, they are a serious liability in the
> desert, and I came back thinking "next time, carry light!" and if
this
> meant more than two journeys then so be it.
>
> I don't have any experience with trailers on my toyo but I know that
it
> takes ages to fine-tune for towing trailers and small caravans, and I
> guess its the same for horse boxes. Not that I am the expert since I
> aint, not by a long way.
>
> Recently I saw a toyo 4x4 on the M4 with a hefty horse box - I've
never
> actually seen a horse box so finely tuned to being towed - the back
of
> the 4x4 was neither up nor down, nor was the horse box. So I guessed
> they got the weight ratio pretty much aokay. When I overtook the
toyo
> and box I spend considerable time looking at how finely balanced
> everything was. Usually I see them up ending a bit, or being so
weighed
> down at the back there is considerable chance for it all to go
> pear-shaped. I don't know what the guy must have thought, me peering
at
> his bits and into the cab - a quick meeting of the eye resulted in me
> giving the thumbs up and smiling, well, I couldn't do anything else -
it
> was a dark red 80 with grey trim, I think it was a K or an L
registration
>
> So, just an observation, nothing important in that - well it made my
> day, to see another 80 when all I tend to see these days is toyo
surfs
> with the front like an 80 but the back a surf.
>
> Renate
>
>> >> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 11:26am >>>
> Julian Voelcker wrote:
>
>> I would love to build a draw system for all the junk in the back,
but
>> they are a pain when you need the full load space for fun tasks
like
>> shifting furniture.
>
> Reading this, and the various threads about adding fitted kit to the
> boot, I feel I should describe my experience of last week.
>
> I had to travel to Yorkshire to clear out my father's house, and I
> rented a 10'x6'x6' trailer to help to carry the stuff. On the way
back
> the trailer was laden, but in a well balanced way. However I had a
lot
> of heavy stuff in the back of the truck, mostly boxes of books, and
the
> headlight adjuster had to go down two clicks, which gives a measure
of
> the load on the rear axle.
>
> At anything above 50mph the trailer was completely uncontrollable -
> something I've never experienced before when towing the horses.
Those
> who have teased me (nicely) before about our equine activities will
know
> that I'm pretty experienced at hauling heavy loads, and 3 nags +
trailer
> are easily twice the weight of what I was pulling then.
>
> So the moral is, I believe, that if you are going to add significant
> permanent weight at the rear you really must think about upgrading
the
> springs, otherwise you may have stability problems when subsequently
> towing - or possibly even solo at high speed.
>
> Probably pretty obvious to all you experts, but it came as an
unpleasant
> shock to me - and Yorkshire is an awful long ride from Devon at
50mph!
>
> Christopher Bell
> Devon, UK
> 1996 1HD-FT
>
> --
> European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/lists/
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date:
26/01/2005
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date:
26/01/2005
>
--
Alan Thomson
Dunfermline, Scotland
1994 KZJ70, 2" OME lift, Warn HS9500, Custom exhaust,
33" Simex Jungle Trekkers
http://www.mudcruzr.com
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Alan
If I ever were to tow a trailer, than I would have thought it would be
an obvious choice to set the weights correctly - Okay, I drive in the
deserts of Africa but I'm not ignorant about weight ratios, obviously.
So please, don't jump in when all I have made is an observation.
Renate
>>> [Email address removed] 01/31/05 01:09pm >>>
Sorry Ranate, I have to jump in here, if you saw a car/trailer rig that
"looked good, was efficient AND effective" then I will guarantee that
the tailer had a nose weight of about 50 to 75kg. If a trailer
noseweight is significantly lighter than 50kg or so, the trailer is
very
difficult to control (swaying and badly affected by crosswinds) if it's
much heavier than that the car starts to get that "hang ass" look and
the car handling (and more importantly braking) are adversely
affected.
Sorry I had to jump in, but if you are ever going to tow a trailer,
please set the nose weight correctly.
Alan
P.S. This really only applies to "proper trailers", e.g horse boxes,
caravans, car transporters etc. Not the silly little wheelbarrow things
you get from Halfords - I'm not sure if the whole trailer weighs 75kg!
Renate Haupt wrote:
> rob
> Sorry about this next sentence, Rob, As I said, balance is what it
> seemed to be to me - it looked good, was efficient AND effective -
> neither horse box nor car were at all stressing, both were very
> quiet and I was close enough to see and hear if either was straining!
to
> me this is how it is supposed to be, so I'm tending to disagree with
> your sentence - sorry.
> Renate
>
> >>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 09:42pm >>>
>
> Hi
>
>
>
> A perfect balance is NOT what you want when towing a trailer Caravan,
> horse box ,etc. You need a nose down force of 50-100 Kg's.
>
>
>
> Rob
>
>
>
> See http://www.rmtrailers.co.uk/towing-tips.htm
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> *From:* [Email address removed]
> [mailto:[Email address removed]] *On Behalf Of *Renate Haupt
> *Sent:* 28 January 2005 11:51
> *To:* [Email address removed]
> *Subject:* Re: [ELCO] observation of fine-balanced tuning for towing
>
>
>
> Chris
>
> I anticipated carrying heavy loads when planning the last african
trip
> so had heavy duty springs and shocks fitted - the upside is that they
> also gave me an additional 2.5-3" lift.
>
> I adjusted the headlight beams but I guess knowing what damage
weight
> can do to, especially at speed.
>
> I secured all the heavy stuff, including 60+ ltrs of water right up
to
> the back of the folded down middle seat, as hard as I could, they
still
> worked loose.
>
> I worked out that I was carrying half a tonne of stuff, most of this
was
> food, water and beast bits, and was accutely aware that my axles and
> even the chasis might suffer as a consequence of desert dune driving.
I
> didn't fancy attaching a trailer, they are a serious liability in the
> desert, and I came back thinking "next time, carry light!" and if
this
> meant more than two journeys then so be it.
>
> I don't have any experience with trailers on my toyo but I know that
it
> takes ages to fine-tune for towing trailers and small caravans, and I
> guess its the same for horse boxes. Not that I am the expert since I
> aint, not by a long way.
>
> Recently I saw a toyo 4x4 on the M4 with a hefty horse box - I've
never
> actually seen a horse box so finely tuned to being towed - the back
of
> the 4x4 was neither up nor down, nor was the horse box. So I guessed
> they got the weight ratio pretty much aokay. When I overtook the
toyo
> and box I spend considerable time looking at how finely balanced
> everything was. Usually I see them up ending a bit, or being so
weighed
> down at the back there is considerable chance for it all to go
> pear-shaped. I don't know what the guy must have thought, me peering
at
> his bits and into the cab - a quick meeting of the eye resulted in me
> giving the thumbs up and smiling, well, I couldn't do anything else -
it
> was a dark red 80 with grey trim, I think it was a K or an L
registration
>
> So, just an observation, nothing important in that - well it made my
> day, to see another 80 when all I tend to see these days is toyo
surfs
> with the front like an 80 but the back a surf.
>
> Renate
>
>> >> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 11:26am >>>
> Julian Voelcker wrote:
>
>> I would love to build a draw system for all the junk in the back,
but
>> they are a pain when you need the full load space for fun tasks
like
>> shifting furniture.
>
> Reading this, and the various threads about adding fitted kit to the
> boot, I feel I should describe my experience of last week.
>
> I had to travel to Yorkshire to clear out my father's house, and I
> rented a 10'x6'x6' trailer to help to carry the stuff. On the way
back
> the trailer was laden, but in a well balanced way. However I had a
lot
> of heavy stuff in the back of the truck, mostly boxes of books, and
the
> headlight adjuster had to go down two clicks, which gives a measure
of
> the load on the rear axle.
>
> At anything above 50mph the trailer was completely uncontrollable -
> something I've never experienced before when towing the horses.
Those
> who have teased me (nicely) before about our equine activities will
know
> that I'm pretty experienced at hauling heavy loads, and 3 nags +
trailer
> are easily twice the weight of what I was pulling then.
>
> So the moral is, I believe, that if you are going to add significant
> permanent weight at the rear you really must think about upgrading
the
> springs, otherwise you may have stability problems when subsequently
> towing - or possibly even solo at high speed.
>
> Probably pretty obvious to all you experts, but it came as an
unpleasant
> shock to me - and Yorkshire is an awful long ride from Devon at
50mph!
>
> Christopher Bell
> Devon, UK
> 1996 1HD-FT
>
> --
> European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/lists/
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date:
26/01/2005
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date:
26/01/2005
>
--
Alan Thomson
Dunfermline, Scotland
1994 KZJ70, 2" OME lift, Warn HS9500, Custom exhaust,
33" Simex Jungle Trekkers
http://www.mudcruzr.com
 
G

Guest

Guest
Alan
What can I say? you've already passed judgement on me Alan.
The sad thing about this is that you really ought not to judge anyone
before you know them. I can say this because I have done this in the
past myself, and regretted it.
So be straight with me, and take this off-list. You have the college
email that I use and if you address it just to that email address, then
it will be off-list. If you want to say anything about you thinking I
am ignorant of weight ratios, then do so off-list so others are not
embroiled in this argument, okay?
For the record, my track record with weight distribution is very good.
Loaded vehicles under my control have never experienced problems.
Renate
Since I am not a trailer or horsebox owner I can only say what I saw.
I don't recall saying that it was either good or bad
>>> [Email address removed] 01/31/05 01:46pm >>>
Sorry again Renate, but for the sake of safety (yours!) I had to reply
when you disagreed with Rob, when he was absolutely correct.
And I will continue to jump in, when safety is concerned.
And it was not at all obvious from your post that you were not ignorant
of weight ratios, much the opposite. It seemed to indicate that you
felt
a balanced trailer was best.
Renate Haupt wrote:
> Alan
> If I ever were to tow a trailer, than I would have thought it would
be
> an obvious choice to set the weights correctly - Okay, I drive in the
> deserts of Africa but I'm not ignorant about weight ratios,
obviously.
> So please, don't jump in when all I have made is an observation.
> Renate
>
> >>> [Email address removed] 01/31/05 01:09pm >>>
> Sorry Ranate, I have to jump in here, if you saw a car/trailer rig
that
> "looked good, was efficient AND effective" then I will guarantee
that
> the tailer had a nose weight of about 50 to 75kg. If a trailer
> noseweight is significantly lighter than 50kg or so, the trailer is
very
> difficult to control (swaying and badly affected by crosswinds) if
it's
> much heavier than that the car starts to get that "hang ass" look
and
> the car handling (and more importantly braking) are adversely
affected.
>
> Sorry I had to jump in, but if you are ever going to tow a trailer,
> please set the nose weight correctly.
>
> Alan
>
> P.S. This really only applies to "proper trailers", e.g horse boxes,
> caravans, car transporters etc. Not the silly little wheelbarrow
things
> you get from Halfords - I'm not sure if the whole trailer weighs
75kg!
>
> Renate Haupt wrote:
> > rob
> > Sorry about this next sentence, Rob, As I said, balance is what
it
> > seemed to be to me - it looked good, was efficient AND effective
-
> > neither horse box nor car were at all stressing, both were very
> > quiet and I was close enough to see and hear if either was
straining! to
> > me this is how it is supposed to be, so I'm tending to disagree
with
> > your sentence - sorry.
> > Renate
> >
> > >>> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 09:42pm >>>
> >
> > Hi
> >
> >
> >
> > A perfect balance is NOT what you want when towing a trailer
Caravan,
> > horse box ,etc. You need a nose down force of 50-100 Kg's.
> >
> >
> >
> > Rob
> >
> >
> >
> > See http://www.rmtrailers.co.uk/towing-tips.htm
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > *From:* [Email address removed]
> > [mailto:[Email address removed]] *On Behalf Of *Renate Haupt
> > *Sent:* 28 January 2005 11:51
> > *To:* [Email address removed]
> > *Subject:* Re: [ELCO] observation of fine-balanced tuning for
towing
> >
> >
> >
> > Chris
> >
> > I anticipated carrying heavy loads when planning the last african
trip
> > so had heavy duty springs and shocks fitted - the upside is that
they
> > also gave me an additional 2.5-3" lift.
> >
> > I adjusted the headlight beams but I guess knowing what damage
weight
> > can do to, especially at speed.
> >
> > I secured all the heavy stuff, including 60+ ltrs of water right
up to
> > the back of the folded down middle seat, as hard as I could, they
still
> > worked loose.
> >
> > I worked out that I was carrying half a tonne of stuff, most of
this was
> > food, water and beast bits, and was accutely aware that my axles
and
> > even the chasis might suffer as a consequence of desert dune
driving. I
> > didn't fancy attaching a trailer, they are a serious liability in
the
> > desert, and I came back thinking "next time, carry light!" and if
this
> > meant more than two journeys then so be it.
> >
> > I don't have any experience with trailers on my toyo but I know
that it
> > takes ages to fine-tune for towing trailers and small caravans,
and I
> > guess its the same for horse boxes. Not that I am the expert
since I
> > aint, not by a long way.
> >
> > Recently I saw a toyo 4x4 on the M4 with a hefty horse box - I've
never
> > actually seen a horse box so finely tuned to being towed - the
back of
> > the 4x4 was neither up nor down, nor was the horse box. So I
guessed
> > they got the weight ratio pretty much aokay. When I overtook the
toyo
> > and box I spend considerable time looking at how finely balanced
> > everything was. Usually I see them up ending a bit, or being so
weighed
> > down at the back there is considerable chance for it all to go
> > pear-shaped. I don't know what the guy must have thought, me
peering at
> > his bits and into the cab - a quick meeting of the eye resulted in
me
> > giving the thumbs up and smiling, well, I couldn't do anything
else - it
> > was a dark red 80 with grey trim, I think it was a K or an L
registration
> >
> > So, just an observation, nothing important in that - well it made
my
> > day, to see another 80 when all I tend to see these days is toyo
surfs
> > with the front like an 80 but the back a surf.
> >
> > Renate
> >
> >> >> [Email address removed] 01/28/05 11:26am >>>
> > Julian Voelcker wrote:
> >
> >> I would love to build a draw system for all the junk in the
back, but
> >> they are a pain when you need the full load space for fun tasks
like
> >> shifting furniture.
> >
> > Reading this, and the various threads about adding fitted kit to
the
> > boot, I feel I should describe my experience of last week.
> >
> > I had to travel to Yorkshire to clear out my father's house, and
I
> > rented a 10'x6'x6' trailer to help to carry the stuff. On the way
back
> > the trailer was laden, but in a well balanced way. However I had
a lot
> > of heavy stuff in the back of the truck, mostly boxes of books,
and the
> > headlight adjuster had to go down two clicks, which gives a
measure of
> > the load on the rear axle.
> >
> > At anything above 50mph the trailer was completely uncontrollable
-
> > something I've never experienced before when towing the horses.
Those
> > who have teased me (nicely) before about our equine activities
will know
> > that I'm pretty experienced at hauling heavy loads, and 3 nags +
trailer
> > are easily twice the weight of what I was pulling then.
> >
> > So the moral is, I believe, that if you are going to add
significant
> > permanent weight at the rear you really must think about upgrading
the
> > springs, otherwise you may have stability problems when
subsequently
> > towing - or possibly even solo at high speed.
> >
> > Probably pretty obvious to all you experts, but it came as an
unpleasant
> > shock to me - and Yorkshire is an awful long ride from Devon at
50mph!
> >
> > Christopher Bell
> > Devon, UK
> > 1996 1HD-FT
> >
> > --
> > European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> > Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/lists/
> >
> >
> > --
> > No virus found in this incoming message.
> > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> > Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date:
26/01/2005
> >
> >
> > --
> > No virus found in this outgoing message.
> > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> > Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.7.5 - Release Date:
26/01/2005
> >
>
>
> --
> Alan Thomson
> Dunfermline, Scotland
> 1994 KZJ70, 2" OME lift, Warn HS9500, Custom exhaust,
> 33" Simex Jungle Trekkers
> http://www.mudcruzr.com <http://www.mudcruzr.com/>
> --
> European Land Cruiser Owners Mailing List
> Further Info: http://www.landcruisers.info/lists/
--
Alan Thomson
Dunfermline, Scotland
1994 KZJ70, 2" OME lift, Warn HS9500, Custom exhaust,
33" Simex Jungle Trekkers
http://www.mudcruzr.com
 
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