Remote switch

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Guest

Guest
Hi all,
Here's a query regarding a new project:
I am trying to develop a switch that will be controlled mechanically
by a remote actuator.
In other words, the body of the switch and the knob for switching it
on and off are to be separated. This is because the switched wires
have to be short, but the controls are placed the back of the vehicle.
The distance between the two will greater than 3 meters.
I have some ideas how to build such a switch but was wondering if
anyone has seen such a thing ready made, just to to save me the time
and effort?
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
G

Guest

Guest
Roman, I am thinking solenoids, as in supply a current and the effect
results in a movement. Is this what you are alluding to?
What is it you are seeking to achieve, can you supply more details?
Regards Gareth.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Roman
Pressure switch on the end of a piece of tube? (eg water level sensor
in a washing machine)
Christopher Bell
| Hi all,
|
| Here's a query regarding a new project:
|
| I am trying to develop a switch that will be controlled
| mechanically by a remote actuator.
|
| In other words, the body of the switch and the knob for
| switching it on and off are to be separated. This is because
| the switched wires have to be short, but the controls are
| placed the back of the vehicle.
| The distance between the two will greater than 3 meters.
|
| I have some ideas how to build such a switch but was
| wondering if anyone has seen such a thing ready made, just to
| to save me the time and effort?
|
| --
| Rgds,
| Roman (London, UK)
____________________________________________________________
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G

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Guest
Gareth,
A relay or solenoid is not an option because the switch must be on at
all times without causing battery drain (except in emergency, when it
cuts off all current supply to the vehicle) .
A solenoid that is normally off can't be relied on to disconnect the
circuit which includes it's own coil.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Gareth Jones <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Christopher,
That's a thought, but it's a three way switched circuit and
pressure/vacvuum may be hard to maitain for prolonged periods withoiut
the engine running.
A flexible mechanical shaft would be a better choice IMHO.
Gareth,
No, not the alarm. It's for battery disconnect but not for the starter
circuit as it has it's own solenoid (controled by the ignition key
switch)
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Gareth Jones <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
I don't see that holding vacuum/pressure would be necessary if your
switch could latch in any of the 3 positions, as you would only need the
pressure to activate it. But I agree it could be difficult.
So, what about a flexible cable in a tube? As in motorbike / lawn-mower
controls.
I presume that if it's a battery disconnect it is going to be a fairly
hefty switch requiring a reasonable amount of force / torque to operate
it, but you should be able to rig up a good lever arm so that shouldn't
be a problem. To avoid transmitting compression down the system you
might have to have a return spring at the switch end.
CB
|
| Christopher,
|
| That's a thought, but it's a three way switched circuit and
| pressure/vacvuum may be hard to maitain for prolonged periods
| withoiut the engine running.
|
| A flexible mechanical shaft would be a better choice IMHO.
|
| Gareth,
|
| No, not the alarm. It's for battery disconnect but not for
| the starter circuit as it has it's own solenoid (controled by
| the ignition key
| switch)
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G

Guest

Guest
Right - we are getting somewhere !!
So this flexible mechancal shaft - presumably you want linear movement
? In two directions to give on / off ??
How about a throttle cable for a petrol lawnmower ?
The activating quadrant has mounting holes. The inner cable is
restrained by the outer and they come in lengths up to well over a
metre.
You can attach some form of nipple or plunger to the inner to trip a
switch.
SEE
-http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=82248&item=7761079443
Gareth.
 
G

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Guest
So is it a battery disconnect switch?
Some track cars use a battery isolating switch connected by
a bowden cable (like a bicycle brake cable) for remote operation.
Is this the sort of thing you want ?
Rob
 
G

Guest

Guest
durite do a solenoid operated battery isolator switch if thats any use?
any decent motorfactors should have a durite catalogue you can look
through, they do a number of different ones.
brian
 
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Guest
Roman,
I have a 'Tweeny' waste disposal unit in my kitchen. This unit is
operated by pushing a panel on the wall, it is air operated, the air
compresses behind the push panel, the switch is push on, push off,
laching in both directions. This obviousley calls in some other
solenoid or switch but I see your distance being no problem for this
setup.
Regards, Clive.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Rob,
Ideally, I'd like to use a rotary switch as it is easier to find a 3
way switch of this type. Bowden cable is an option but it requires a
bit of tinkering to translate the pull action into shaft rotation. I'm
wondering if there is a bowden cable or similar (solid inner core?)
that can transfer rotary movement?
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Rob Edwards <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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Brian,
Thanks. I already have a durite H/D battery isolator. What I need now
is a small switch (about 10A) used to disconnect the isolator coil and
two other circuits.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Brian - Irish 4x4 <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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Guest

Guest
Gareth,
Thanks. That's like the bowden cable - see my reply to Rob.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Gareth Jones <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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Guest

Guest
Have you thought about a latched relay? The control circuit would be live
but would not draw current.
http://www.distel.co.uk/asps/details1.asp?ID=LE92 lists relay but only good
for 8A, could be used to control a second higher current relay.
Malcolm Bagley
Stafford, UK
1975 FJ45 Pickup (In Work)
_______________________________
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]] On
Behalf Of Roman
Sent: 27 June 2006 22:54
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Remote switch
Brian,
Thanks. I already have a durite H/D battery isolator. What I need now
is a small switch (about 10A) used to disconnect the isolator coil and
two other circuits.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Brian - Irish 4x4 <[Email address removed]> wrote:

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Guest
Malcolm,
Yes, I have. A latching relay could be an option, but when you press a
button to disconnect all power supply, the relay will not work because
the contacts that supply power from battery (including to its coil)
will be opening at the sime time.
That's why strictly mechanical activation is better.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/28/06, Malcolm Bagley <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
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Roman,
'I'm wondering if there is a bowden cable or similar (solid inner core?)
that can transfer rotary movement?'
How about a speedo cable? You may need to find one off a truck to get it
long enough. And you'd need to find a reliable way of connecting it at
either end.
Toby
1990 HDJ80 UK
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G

Guest

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Toby,
Yes, a speedo cable would be the right thing but I doubt I could find
in a scrapyard one that's long enough. I think they are usually 1 -
1.5 m long to avoid friction, but maybe I am wrong.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/28/06, Toby Welburn <[Email address removed]> wrote:
=96 The Wall Street Journal
 
G

Guest

Guest
Roman,
'I'm wondering if there is a bowden cable or similar (solid inner
core?)
that can transfer rotary movement?'
OR
Convert linear to rotary via a lever arm mounted on a shaft, or find
some very small rack and pinion device.
Gareth.
 
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Roman
A number of Rockshox mountainbike front shocks use remote lockout
devices where you have a flexible cable inside a housing with a lever on
the handlebar end and a small "wheel" attached to the shock which is
rotated by pushing/pulling on the lever (i.e. changing the pull force of
the cable into a rotational force). This could be a solution for you to
use a rotary switch.
I'm believe you'd be able to buy these adjusters separately - you should
be able to find something on Chainreactioncycles.com or swing by your
local bike shop.
Regards
paul
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Roman
Sent: dinsdag 27 juni 2006 23:50
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Remote switch
Rob,
Ideally, I'd like to use a rotary switch as it is easier to find a 3 way
switch of this type. Bowden cable is an option but it requires a bit of
tinkering to translate the pull action into shaft rotation. I'm
wondering if there is a bowden cable or similar (solid inner core?) that
can transfer rotary movement?
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 6/27/06, Rob Edwards <[Email address removed]> wrote:
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