SPECIAL TOOL.

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Renate, if this special tool is a stud extractor, my advice is proceed
with extreme caution. They are made of a very hard material. If the
extractor snaps, which is far from unknown, then you have a major
problem because, unless you are using tungsten carbide tipped drills, no
conventional high speed steel will touch them.
If it was me, I would be looking at drilling a pilot hole part way into
the stud and using a drift , located in the pilot hole, to knock the
remainder out, or removing the hub and using a hydraulic bench press to
push it out.
Hope I haven't put the cat too far into the proverbial pigeons !!!
Regards Gareth Jones.
 
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I concur wholeheartedly with Gareth.
Stud extractors are of no use at all if the broken stud is in any way
siezed in; the extractor will more that likely snap off. They are only
of use on a normally tightened bolt or stud, not a siezed one.
IMHO anyway.
Pete
Gareth Jones wrote:
 
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Renate, one further point. Wheel studs are in 99.999% of cases and
includes LC's, held in place by splines not by threads. Therefore the
rotary action of turning the extractor will not overcome the gripping of
the splines.
Hold fire girl, you will only get a bigger problem.
Gareth.
 
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Blow Torch - I have a choice of sizes ! if you wish to borrow one.
Gareth.
 
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On 7/13/05, Gareth Jones <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Gareth, I'm not a sticlkler but stud extractor and bolt extractor are
two different tools. The former has a serrated wheel that jams the
stud agains an angled recess, the former is as descrtibed in the other
posts (opposite locked in a hole drilled in the broken bolt).
As it has been mentioned already, neither will be useful for this job.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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On 7/13/05, [Email address removed] <[Email address removed]> wrote:
,
m
g
n?
Renate
Tungsten carbide drills are best for masonry work, For metalwork you
normally use HSS drills. It's that the bolt extractors are made of
steel grade that cannot be worked with HSS tools.
Pilot hole is a hole you'd be supposed to drill in the broken bolt (if
it applied to the case) along it's axis to insert the bolt extractor,
then turn it anticlockwise to get a grip on the walls of the pilot
hole and so release the broken bolt.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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Renate
I was talking at cross purpose with you. It is the threaded stud that
the wheel nut screws onto that has broken, yes? If so then the stud is
not threaded into the hole but pressed in; you need to hammer it
straight out towards the back of the hub. It's a splined interference
fit, not threaded.
You need a blowtorch, a hammer and a suitably sized drift, not a stud /
bolt extractor.
Pete
[Email address removed] wrote:
 
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Guest
Roman, you are quite correct and I apologise for mixing my
terminologies. Incedentally I have both things Renate.
TCT drills are commonly used in masonary bits --- however ----- if you
go to a specialist tool supplier like Buck & Hickman in Bristol, you can
get metal cutting TCT drills. They have the first few mm's in a solid
block of carbide, I have some and damm useful they are too.
I also advocate the use of L.H. DRILLS to remove boken studs, as you
are drilling the heat generated often breaks the seal and all of sudden
out comes the broken bit.
Gareth.
 
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Renate, Peter has described what needs to be done and how. I have the
necessay tools and you are welcome to borrow them. The only thing I do
not have is time.
If we are talking about the same thing, i.e. one of the 6 studs that
you locate the wheel over and then thread the wheelnut onto each stud --
I will state quite categorically that it is splined and not threaded
into the hub.
Gareth.
 
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As to inserting a replacement stud use a wheel nut the wrong way round
(flat side towards the hub) and a stack of suitably sized and very well
greased washers between the hub and the wheel nut.
Tighten up the wheel nut with a very well fitting socket and the stud
will pull into the hole.
Pete
 
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Renate,
As I have pointed out in my email earlier this morning, you need to
remove the wheel, caliper and then the hub from the vehicle in order to
replace the stud.
Once you have the hub off you need to remove the disk from the hub
(because the studs back onto the disk) although it is easier to loosen
the bolts for the disk whilst the hub is on the axle.
Once you have the disk of, you will need a combination of patience, heat
(from a blow torch), drifts/punches and a hammer to knock out the old
stud.
You could try partially drilling it out (don't go all the way through)
to reduce the pressure on the sides of the stud.
Since you are already waiting for new disks for the front, you might as
well do it all at once.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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