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Sumo, and some-more

clivehorridge

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An good old Italian friend and colleague of mine, Ciro Ferriero, often used to start a sentence with "I 'ava two news..." and you always knew what was coming next, the good news and then the bad news.

I'm going to do the same, but first, and not connected, I've noticed recently a very slight rumbling, almost a vibration, coming from the front, maybe the left side as you drive, in my case the drivers' side (its LHD).

I'm thinking a wheel bearing, because although I've had 3 axle rebuilds in the last 11 years of ownership, (for various reasons), the wheel bearings are original and have done over 400k km.

So today, I thought I'd jack up that end of the axle to have a feel for any play. Up it went and there's nothing untoward apparent, no play, it rotates smoothly and consequently I don't really know. I'll get someone elses opinion I guess.

However, looking at the inner tyrewall and wheel rim, there appears to have been some liquid coming from somewhere. A weep methinks, either oil or melted grease (the weather is still warm here). Any offers? Of course I don't mean the dampness around the cannonball dust seal, I'm referring to the bottom of the wheel (tyrewall and rim).

IMG_0024.JPG

OK, all that aside, lets get back to the "two news".

The good news is the SUMO steering bars that Nick very kindly brought from the UK to me here are the right ones, so I set about fitting the bar that runs from the end of the Pitman arm down to the opposite front wheel.

Nick bought them from these guys...

IMG_0046.JPG


I slackened off the ball-joint clamps, and got my pipe wrench on the old bar and wrestled it off. They're long threads on those ball-joints, and its a bit tedious to do especially as the threads were a bit rusted.

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Just over half-way...
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Not nice to see rusty threads, but they're in better condition than this photo makes them look...
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Finally got to the end, and thankfully, both ball-joint threads has been screwed in evenly, something I was keen to be sure of when putting it back together...
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Cleaned the threads up with a wire brush.... and tried on one of the pair of nuts provided with the SUMO bars, realising for the first time that the front rod and ball joints are smaller diameter threads than the rear of the axle tie bar and track-rod end ball jloints...
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Wound on the locking nuts and smeared the threads before and after, with a liberal dose of general purpose grease...
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Measured up both sides the same (about 60mm) ...
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and then checked the new bar length against the original... surprisingly shorter, even allowing for the locking nuts, but hey-ho, no worries, just being sure to make allowance for that when setting up the final length, in situ...
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Smeared grease into the threads in the new bar ends and on it went...

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As Chris commented, not necessary at all, but oooh, theyre nice and shiny...

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Job done! Very pleased with them, but because of the bad news to come, I didn't get to fit the track-rod SUMO bar, that will have to wait a bit.

Now the bad news part needs an introductory story, you're all asleep by now I guess, but here goes.

One of our days out with the UK posse, on the way to the salt mine, took us down a nice little "surprise" short-cut which has some interesting moments along it. It's a cart track, and after the difficult "bumps" part (that everyone romped through with no issues) there was a length of very rutted track, but hardened dry in the heat we've had, so it was a bit tricky.

I was in front, and very conscious of the usual advice, "never drive off-road with your thumbs through the steering wheel, you can break them if ruts or other obstacles snatch the steering over quickly..." that sort of thing...

I was riding with the wheels my side, up on the bank a little, but as almost always, they dropped down into the LHS rut and bang, the rut grabbed the front wheel, spun the steering wheel out of my grip, and slammed the wheel full-lock into the bank. It stopped sharp and suddenly (of course) and I caught my forearm on the steering wheel and actually got a burn off it, it had spun that fast.

I sat for a moment gathering my thoughts, we were only going at walking pace, so I didn't pay much attention, just one of those annoying things that happen, maybe they shouldn't, but they do.

OK, we pressed on, visited the mine and had a good day. On the way home, I noticed (for the first time) that when driving straight, my steering wheel was cranked some 30-40 degrees to the right. That's a lot I thought, what the hell has happened to cause that? Of course I remembered the rut episode, but for the life of me I haven't been able to come up with a reason why or how the the steering wheel had "re-positioned" itself so far to the right, it was a total mystery.

I had sighted up the bars, nothing bent, the Pitman arm looked perfectly normal (certainly not bent) and the tracking was true (track control arm not bent). It drove a lovely as ever, except for the 'new' position of the steering wheel.

However, upon looking a little closer today, I found out why...

IMG_0035.JPG


Can you believe that??? WTF??

The shaft from the steering box that the Pitman arm is splined onto, is twisted, like a piece of candy...

Those that have followed some of my 80 series issues will remember that this shaft sheared on me about 6 years ago, and I had the shaft replaced with a new one OEM, costing me an arm and a leg (380 Euros IIRC) just for the shaft.

And now the bloody thing is twisted... :? not happy. More to come I'm afraid, 'cos while looking up at the shaft, I saw this...

IMG_0037.JPG


Bloody hell, a fresh crack around the weld where the "turret" thingy attaches to the chassis, under the steering box, where the Panhard mounts....

I check regularly all around the steering box-to-chassis bolts, because 80s have a habit of cracking chassis at those mountings, and they are OK (I checked again today) but the Panhard mounting-to-chassis welds have cracked.

So, another couple of jobs to do, and not easy ones. The Service garage I use can do the steering box (third re-build) with a new shaft. Someone said to use a shaft for the hundee, they're thicker, can anyone confirm that and that it would fit?

The welding will have to be done a Dan the bodywork and painter guy, he's a dab hand with a welder, and knows what he's doing, chassis-wise.

So it's been a day of mixed feelings, pleased with my SUMOs, yet pretty p!ssed with the candy-bar shaft and the cracks.

It didn't get much better. I moved on to find out why my rear locker doesn't work. I found a broken wire to the plug on the detent switch, and when I pulled the plug off, I fount that one of the connector tabs in the switch had corroded away. S now I need a new detent switch and a plug with some wire tails in good condition, to splice back into the loom. Does that switch have anything to do with the operation of the actuator? I'm thinking not, it just tells the dash light to come on to confirm that the diff lock is engaged, I think. Can anyone confirm this please?

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The other wires to the locker actuator are in a bundle and plug in close by, but I couldn't get that plug apart, it was like it was glued solid. I'm guessing those terminals/connections are just as bad as the detent switch terminals, so I gave up and reassembled it, rather disheartened with my day.

:violin:

Time for a beer with Chas. :(
 

Chris

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Sorry Clive - did you say there was good news too? Are you saving that for later?

Jeez man, what a day! The bars are lovely. Unnecessary of course but shiny. Oh, was that the good news?
 

clivehorridge

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Sorry Clive - did you say there was good news too? Are you saving that for later?

Jeez man, what a day! The bars are lovely. Unnecessary of course but shiny. Oh, was that the good news?

That was the good news Chris, brief, but soooo shiny!
 

Rodger

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Hi Clive,

looking at the inner tyrewall and wheel rim, there appears to have been some liquid coming from somewhere. A weep methinks, either oil or melted grease (the weather is still warm here). Any offers? Of course I don't mean the dampness around the cannonball dust seal, I'm referring to the bottom of the wheel (tyrewall and rim)

That looks like oil to me which would indicate the inner oil seal is not doing its job.
And 'two news' - that also looks like oil spread above and not melted grease.

It's hot down here too and last week I rebuilt both knuckles as there was an oil trace but the melted grease had a different look to it - much thicker and not absorbed into the dust, etc..

Sorry to, potentially, add to your list of woes

Regards,

Rodger
 

Iwan

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Ohhhh bugger Clive. With my 81 I had a similar experience with my passenger side wheel and again nearly broke my thumb at Limcomb and it bent my adjustable front pannard rod. The journey home up the A49 was terrifying!

The cracks could have been developing for a while often they have rust running from them when are old.
Probably wise to have the chassis plated over the area after the crack is rewelded.

One reason why I'm taking the 12v out on mine so I can plate over the cracks on the steering box mount etc.

The sumo bars are the biz. I have them on my 60 series,

Good luck with it, but do extra reinforcement work as the problem is there!:thumbup:
 

clivehorridge

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Ohhhh bugger Clive. With my 81 I had a similar experience with my passenger side wheel and again nearly broke my thumb at Limcomb and it bent my adjustable front pannard rod. The journey home up the A49 was terrifying!

The cracks could have been developing for a while often they have rust running from them when are old.
Probably wise to have the chassis plated over the area after the crack is rewelded.

One reason why I'm taking the 12v out on mine so I can plate over the cracks on the steering box mount etc.

The sumo bars are the biz. I have them on my 60 series,

Good luck with it, but do extra reinforcement work as the problem is there!:thumbup:

Yes, will-do, the steel is in good condition so it will take some hefty reinforcement easily.

The rest is a bummer though, especially that pesky shaft in the steering box, why me? :? :lol:
 
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clivehorridge

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Hi Clive,

looking at the inner tyrewall and wheel rim, there appears to have been some liquid coming from somewhere. A weep methinks, either oil or melted grease (the weather is still warm here). Any offers? Of course I don't mean the dampness around the cannonball dust seal, I'm referring to the bottom of the wheel (tyrewall and rim)

That looks like oil to me which would indicate the inner oil seal is not doing its job.
And 'two news' - that also looks like oil spread above and not melted grease.

It's hot down here too and last week I rebuilt both knuckles as there was an oil trace but the melted grease had a different look to it - much thicker and not absorbed into the dust, etc..

Sorry to, potentially, add to your list of woes

Regards,

Rodger

No worries Rodger, in for a penny...

I'll have that side stripped and a new seal put in. Might as well do the bearings while he's in there.

Sadly it's a job beyond my confidence and the right tools and time is an issue.

It's only money. :doh: Serves me right for ordering a new set of tyres on Monday, all this is my penance! :lol:
 

Gary820

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Nice and shiny followed by oh bugger!!
I think I would've gone back to bed if my day was going like that!!

That's a fair list of work to be done.
 

clivehorridge

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Nice and shiny followed by oh bugger!!
I think I would've gone back to bed if my day was going like that!!

That's a fair list of work to be done.

I can't complain Gary, the truck has served me well these 11 years, and some I've seen (80s) have been so much worse.

I'll get it done, but it's a reminder that they're getting on, mines 22 and it's not had an easy life, before or since I got it! :lol:
 

Shayne

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Bad news on the face of it Clive but good news in the grander scheme of things , had you not knocked the steering it all might have gone unnoticed for however long so ultimately its just let you stay ahead of the game .
 

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That sucks Clive. Now go to the fridge and have some chocolate. It will make you feel better.
 

chapel gate

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Things do sometimes seem to come all at once clive.

was it just the pitman arm you replaced clive or the entire shaft with the upgraded version?
 

StarCruiser

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Sorry to hear of your woes Clive.

Dribble- does it do it every time it's parked, in other words is there more than one trace? It may be wishful thinking but with no trace visible on the axle above I was wondering if an animal had peed on the wheel and it had dribbled through.

Connector- this sort of damage usually results from a nick or other damage to the insulation. The one you couldn't part- I've often had this where I haven't pressed the catch in properly. Struggle for ten minutes thinking it's seized then get the catch pressed in and it almost falls apart. Worse when it's in an awkward place. Have another go and give the catch a good push after pushing the connector together rather than pulling, then pull (if that makes sense).

Twisted steering shaft- :icon-surprised: that was some thump to do that! I dismissed that as a possibility even before thinking of it. Lesson learned!

Cracks- oh dear!
 

clivehorridge

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Sorry to hear of your woes Clive.

Dribble- does it do it every time it's parked, in other words is there more than one trace? It may be wishful thinking but with no trace visible on the axle above I was wondering if an animal had peed on the wheel and it had dribbled through.

Connector- this sort of damage usually results from a nick or other damage to the insulation. The one you couldn't part- I've often had this where I haven't pressed the catch in properly. Struggle for ten minutes thinking it's seized then get the catch pressed in and it almost falls apart. Worse when it's in an awkward place. Have another go and give the catch a good push after pushing the connector together rather than pulling, then pull (if that makes sense).

Twisted steering shaft- :icon-surprised: that was some thump to do that! I dismissed that as a possibility even before thinking of it. Lesson learned!

Cracks- oh dear!

No dribble to speak of Rich, more of a stain with a fine film left on the paintwork of the wheel, but not wet.

A leak is usually exactly that, quick or slow, but this looks old, but isn't. It's strange, but I'd rather have it apart and get it sorted.

At least the twisted shaft answers the puzzle, because nothing else has and not knowing what had caused it was driving me nuts! Still hard to believe it though.

As for the locker, bah, I hate anything electric :icon-rolleyes::eusa-naughty:
 

clivehorridge

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Things do sometimes seem to come all at once clive.

was it just the pitman arm you replaced clive or the entire shaft with the upgraded version?

Now this is something new, what upgrade?

The original shaft sheared and I had it replaced (OEM), yet nobody mentioned an upgrade.

What do you know, do you have any part numbers or something?

We only changed the shaft, the Pitman arm is original and not damaged AFAIK.

Certainly interested in an upgrade, I'm not having much luck with this little blighter...
 

chapel gate

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Now this is something new, what upgrade?

The original shaft sheared and I had it replaced (OEM), yet nobody mentioned an upgrade.

What do you know, do you have any part numbers or something?

We only changed the shaft, the Pitman arm is original and not damaged AFAIK.

Certainly interested in an upgrade, I'm not having much luck with this little blighter...
https://www.landcruiserclub.net/com...eries-steering-box.139249/page-4#post-1423710

i mentioned it a while ago. Iirc, new steering boxes come with the upgrade. To install to your existing steering box the sector shaft needs replacing too. The twisting of the splines must of been a common enough failure for toyota to take note.

ill get back to you with some more info.
 

karl webster

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Not good Clive.

The dampness will be the inner seal. Very surprised if not. The bearing have done well and the old girl is worth a set I'd say.

Regarding the arm. Personally I'd be speaking to mr T. With the fact you had the previous one snap (could have been yours or someone else's life) I'd be trying to get it replaced free of charge.

Good luck with it mate
 

Dave 2000

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Had a run of iffy luck a few weeks back, just seemed nothing was going right, think big shoulders mate.

The 105 has a stronger steering shaft as Mr T knew this was a weak area. Often shows up after incidents like yours Clive.

See if your garage will fit one for you inc the Pitman.

At least your thumbs are OK, you need them to hold the chocolate! :thumbup:

Regards

Dave.
 

clivehorridge

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Had a run of iffy luck a few weeks back, just seemed nothing was going right, think big shoulders mate.

The 105 has a stronger steering shaft as Mr T knew this was a weak area. Often shows up after incidents like yours Clive.

See if your garage will fit one for you inc the Pitman.

At least your thumbs are OK, you need them to hold the chocolate! :thumbup:

Regards

Dave.

Hi Dave, yes, broad shoulders, 22 year old trucks seem to develop them well !

Are you suggesting a complete swap-out of the existing box to a 105 box? I'm wary of mix and match due to "other" consequences of a clash somewhere else, but if you know it's doable, I'd be interested.

Chapel Gate has indicated an upgrade is available, so I'm investigating that option too. It may amount to the same thing.

Karl's suggestion is valid too, I could have been killed when that shaft sheared off. Now I'm conscious that the current twisted shaft could let go without warning.
 
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