Front UJ replacement

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Guest

Guest
Niall,
As written by others, a UJ is easy to replace, and it really is
something that any overlander should be able to do himself as its a
common field service job if you are out and away from anything like a garage.
The shafts are easy to remove, just 4 bolts at each end, but not only
witness mark the 2 shaft halves before removal, but also the yoke
halves in relation to each other, and the flanges at each end in such
a way that the ends do not also become transposed. (Tipp-ex is the
stuff to use if you don't want to make chisel or centre punch marks).
Also note the exact position of the grease nipple in relation to the
yokes. If you can get a grease gun on them then replicate it,
otherwise fit it at a different angle. This is probably the most
annoying part of the job - getting the grease nipple back in at the
wrong angle! It looks as if it would not matter, but some of us have
'happy' memories of having them in the wrong sector of alignment !
You don't need a vice to do the job, though it helps. But you do need
a very large vice to accomplish the job in a perfect world. A large G
cramp or a cheapo carpenter's sliding jaw clamp is as good, and I did
my UJ's using the latter working in my boat engine room of all
places! Most important is having the right sized socket to use to
press out the old cups. Not just one to fit inside the bore but also
one to fit outside the cup on the outside of the yoke, so that the
cup can be pressed out and into it far enough to give sufficient
length to grip it with a Mole wrench..
Well, you'll see how it all works when you have a go ;o)
Cheers
Jon
Tring,Herts
'92 HZJ80 ex UN Bosnia surplus - keeping the threads separate for
Julian's system !
 
G

Guest

Guest
Thanks Jon

Good pointers there.

Says the man - "I'm good at what I do because I've done it every wrong way possible. The only way left is the right one!"

One way to find out if that Lidel vice I got is any good!

Niall
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jon,
That's in the ideal world - if you don't have these facilities you can
just use a hammer.
The key thing is to remove the end from the UJ first, then remove the UJ
from the main shaft end - if you do it the other way around you are
trying to get the UJ out of the end plate which is difficult to get any
purchase on.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Julian wrote...
That's in the ideal world - if you don't have these facilities you can
just use a hammer.
The key thing is to remove the end from the UJ first, then remove the UJ
from the main shaft end - if you do it the other way around you are
trying to get the UJ out of the end plate which is difficult to get any
purchase on.
SNIP
Julian its not for the ideal world. Even with my years of experience
I try not to use a hammer for this job at all. I would not encourage
an amateur to use a hammer to assemble a UJ. Its OK to use to
dismantle it - as long as one does not burr the outside rim of the
yoke recesses, and that is where those not used to the job can make a
lot of work for themselves if the hammer is off-mark. (Twisting the
cups out with a Mole - after partially pressing them out - is a much
better and gentler option I think). And you can't risk jolting the
needles with a hammer for re-assembly, it must be pressed.
I think if one is an enthusiast and using the TLC for offroading then
one carries a good selection of sockets and other bits and pieces.
Don't I remember watching you using your full tool kit at Salisbury
Plain last year in the pub car park to disengage your rear locker ?
The best solution in the field with no cramps to hand, is to use the
jack to both press out the old and then press in the new bearing
cups. There is enough room to do it between the jack head and the
underside of the chassis, or in fact even the axle where it is
flattened underneath at the outer ends. Its surprising how many tasks
one can accomplish using a vehicle jack and a bit of imagination.
The variations develop as one has to do these things as a necessity
! ( I hurriedly add that this is in reference to vehicles other than
mine which is not 'maintained' to a budget).
Cheers
Jon
Tring,Herts
'92 HZJ80 ex UN Bosnia surplus
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi Jon,
Yes, I guess it does take experience - been doing it that way for about
30years and not had too many problems.
It's the agricultural background - everything can be fixed with a big
hammer and baler twine!!
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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