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The Buyer's Remorse is Strong in This One, Today.

chadr

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I love the cerebral contortions that I go through to justify the expenditure to myself. It must be the same gene in men that, in women, results in them "needing" several dozen pairs of shoes. .....
Also known as "man maths" - helps solve so many (usually) financial issues that simple maths can't! :icon-wink:
 

Tractionman

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The several pairs of shoes 'needed' by women, is a very different need to us regarding tools, and we get more use/life out of them. On that alone, tools are more cost effective, see if that arguement will work !
 

stuzbot

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I agree. My missus has several pairs of shoes in her cupboard that I swear she's not even taken out of the box since the day they arrived --never mind worn.

Now, to the casual observer, it might seem that the same could be said about half the contents of my tool cupboard. But I prefer to think of that as "preparedness", whereas her shoe purchases are "idle frippery".
 

SteveJB

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Re the Irwin kit it's bloody good and 3/8th drive or bigger spanner or use a step up adapter for 1/2 drive
 

BobMurphy

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Hey Stuzbot . .

Instead of running a 200 metre extension lead from your flat for the Dremel . . . Invest in a decent 12V - 240V Inverter and get local mains power from the truck battery :thumbup:.

(Just watch that you don't need that 200 metre cable for the battery charger :doh:).

Bob.
 

Jake the Peg

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A good set of 6 sided 3/8th sockets, extensions, a wire brush, BFH and the cordless grinder are always in my mobile tools when I go to work on the farm trucks, a small map-fire torch can be a life saver too.
If you are able to slacken the brake pipe unions on the chassis rail, you can remove the pipes and get a local garage to make some up for you, try to keep them in the best shape so it makes them easier to refit, save yourself a lot of grief if you do plan to change them by just cutting the pipe right behind the union, and on the chassis rail, leave just enough pipe so you can crimp the old pipe to stop the fluid draining from the master cylinder. Let the people know how much you have cut off the pipes before they make them up again. Dont worry about boiling the fluid in the pipes, you will bleed it out once you’ve fitted everything up again. Also don’t be afraid to warm up around the bleed nipples on the calipers, give them a tap with a smaller hammer, and use a socket to crack them to start with…just be a bit gentle and heat them again if you need

good luck!
 
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Tractionman

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Stuz, while you're in tool buying mode, lol, get a genny. No mile long extensions with voltage drop at the end, and power on hand whenever/wherever you want it. Dont tell the mrs though.
......I'll get me coat.
 

stuzbot

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Stuz, while you're in tool buying mode, lol, get a genny....

Oh. That's been on the 'Wanted List' for a long time.... along with a Compressor... a Plasma Cutter... an Induction Heating Bolt Remover... a High Lift Jack... a bigger Trolley Jack...

It's only the fact everything has to be lugged up and down two flights of stairs and across a carpark --combined with the fact my flat is the size of a shoebox and already groaning at the seams with all my tat... er... 'things that might come in handy'-- that's managed to keep my enthusiasm relatively reined in to encompass only hand and small power tools as yet.

Mind you, a while back, I did manage to justify buying a hydraulic press [which now stands proudly in the corner of my front room] because I can also use it to help with the shaping when making coin rings. So it's the one tool in my arsenal that has genuinely paid for itself.
 

Tractionman

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More than an inconvenience, having to go through that palaver up and down all those stairs every time mate, I feel for you, as previously had a mid terrace house with no rear access and no garage.
The more jobs you do, the needs list gets longer, and what a feature with the hydraulic press in the front room. Lots of people still have plaster ducks on the wall, haha.
My garage is literally full of " things that might come in handy". "Junk" to her indoors, but we can always justify and have room for "1 more". Keep at it Stuz, youre getting there !
 

stuzbot

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Oh no. I've just seen the ultimate 'must have' gadget. Fortunately it only costs half a million yankee dollars, so I may buy two and keep one for best....

 

Grimbo

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"Oh no. I've just seen the ultimate 'must have' gadget. Fortunately it only costs half a million yankee dollars, so I may buy two and keep one for best...."
That metal still shows oxidation..... buy a £300 sandblast cabinet and hire a decent compressor and save yourself nearly half a million yankee dollars and do a better job....
 

Tractionman

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Does fish and chip vinegar (malt) have the same effect as white, which is more pure ?
Never used the malt, but the white sure does work, in fact iirc, someone on here did the underside of his lc with it.
 

stuzbot

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Malt vinegar works fine. And, being brown to start with, it goes with the rust.


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To be fair, I only soaked that in vinegar for one night and so had to give it a good going over with a wire brush too. If time isn't of the essence, I'll usually leave things to soak in vinegar for about a week, as its a pretty weak acid, so the longer you leave it the better.

Here's some old tools of my Granda's that I did a while back, leaving them for a week in vinegar. They were so covered in rust, it came as quite a surprise to find the crusty old hammer was actually a brass headed mallet. And to find that my Granda's initials stamped on the head of it.

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