Tyre Size

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Greetings all
Does anyone knowe what the best tyre size is for the LC
Manual says 275/70/16
How big can you go without having to change gear ratio's and all that
malarky.
If anyone knows what sizes are readily available in Africa - that would
be nice to know......
Who has the biggest boots on the LC list I wonder!!!
Niall
Hdj80
 
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Guest
I was recommended to get 285/75 R16 by Frogs Island and I suspect most
Cruisers leaving there are on these.
Graham
Niall Sommers wrote:
 
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Niall
Not sure about northern africa, but from Tanzania further south the most
common tire size is 7.50x16 (equivalent of 235/85/16). In north africa
they may use a wider tire with all the sand?
You should be able to find most tire sizes in the bigger cities, as long
as you don't go for really big oversize tires.
paul
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed] [mailto:[Email address removed]]
On Behalf Of Niall Sommers
Sent: 07 November 2006 11:20
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: [ELCO] Tyre Size
Greetings all
Does anyone knowe what the best tyre size is for the LC
Manual says 275/70/16
How big can you go without having to change gear ratio's and all that
malarky.
If anyone knows what sizes are readily available in Africa - that would
be nice to know......
Who has the biggest boots on the LC list I wonder!!!
Niall
Hdj80
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G

Guest

Guest
Graham
And how much were they charging? for 6 (in my case)
Renate
-----Original Message-----
From: [Email address removed]
[mailto:[Email address removed]]On Behalf Of Graham & Lucinda Smith
Sent: 07 November 2006 10:54
To: [Email address removed]
Subject: Re: [ELCO] Tyre Size
I was recommended to get 285/75 R16 by Frogs Island and I suspect most
Cruisers leaving there are on these.
Graham
 
G

Guest

Guest
?100 plus vat each, then ?8 ish for balancing... when I booked I never
realised the prices were ex-VAT... and thought I was getting a deal...Duh!!!
I never realised you are in the Overlanding industry... I spent 88 - 91
as a EL for Encounter Overland in Asia and Africa, sadly never made it
to South America... and before anyone assumes why all the questions,
this guy should know... I know how to do it in a Bedford with 20
passengers!!! My LC has more power at idle than the Bedford with a large
brick on the accelerator pedal on a downhill, but the Bedford has 20
passengers 10 of which would be willing to dig and push 1/2 way round
the world, provided I found beer ( not even cold beer). A number of
these people are still my friends 16 years on... Great times...
cheers
Graham.
Renate Haupt wrote:
 
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Guest
BFG tyres are reputed to get torn to bits on African roads. There is a
Michelin that seems to be the current flavour. Does anyone know if
there is truth in this?
Regards, Clive.
 
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Guest
Not sure where you have heard this.I'm currently on BFG A/Ts, would
recommend them as a good tyre for all surfaces, tarmac, rock, sand etc.
Average in mud but not dreadful. Jeff Watts did his London to Cape run on
BFGs and I believe he's on the same for his latest jaunt. Never seen a
shredded BFG in Africa - and I used to live in east africa. But then again
someone else's experience may say otherwise.
You can find more in info at the HUBB - http://tinyurl.com/ylnksj
Have a look under tyres and 4x4 travel and 4x4 tech. Some people love
Michelins but they are hard to find if you need to replace in remote places
and can be expensive. My BFGs have done nearly 25,000 kilometres over a mix
of roads - motorway thrashes, snow, rock, sand, salt lakes, dunes, mud etc
etc. And London potholes. No problems, no pressure drops - `I check
regularly with a portable compressor - even wear etc etc and they have
plenty of life left in them. Recommend them.
HDJ81V with BFGs and other stuff
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
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Clive / Jeremy
Looks like the XZY is being upgraded - More from Ian Hughes on +44(0)1
782 402 370 or [Email address removed]
"Michelin will introduce the new XZY3 on/off-road tyre, a new
anti-splash tyre and its new X-one wide drive-axle tyre. The X-one, a
'super single', is already a sales success in the USA and due for a
European launch later this year. Michelin says the new XZY3 on/off-road
tyre is particularly tough, with 25 per cent more useable rubber than
the XZY tyre it replaces. This means it should offer savings from an
extended service life"
Niall
 
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Interesting to note that the first address you posted was for a trip made in
1998. Somewhere out there there are notes on the improvements made to BFGs
since. The general consensus is that tyres have developed a lot, and
Michelins are only just catching up. Some of this is available on the HUBB.
As for the second address, I'll have to take what they say with a large
pinch of salt. This is what they said about 'other 4x4s' They are obviously
LR people.
This is a a small part of their LR section.
Quote
Despite some weaknesses, Land Rovers are the most durable four-wheel drive
small vehicles on the market. Their spartan comforts are also their main
attributes! Most of their recent challengers are too softly sprung and have
too many car-type comforts to be reliable in difficult cross-country
terrain.
Unquote
Quote
The Land Rover Defender's superb axle articulation and lightweight body
gives it a distinct advantage in mud, snow and soft sand. If these
conditions are not likely to be encountered, then the leaf-sprung Toyota
Land Cruisers are comfortable and reliable, though heavier on fuel. Many
Toyota models have large overhanging front bumpers, rear steps and running
boards, which negate off-road performance. Coil-sprung Toyota Land Cruisers
are less reliable, and the latest models with independent front suspension
are best avoided. Nissan Patrols lack off-road agility and, as with American
four-wheel drives, their large engines are heavy on fuel.
Unquote
Jeremy
HDJ81V + 6 BFG A/Ts and more
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Jeremy
Surely there is some truth in the "light weight" and "departure angles"
comments if they are talking about short wheelbase LR 90s? Although I
think that if I were aiming for Cape Town (or wherever) in any vehicle I
would try to avoid testing extreme off-road performance.
And I had to laugh when reading the Torygraph motoring section last
weekend in which they were driving a new Freelander behind a new Disco
in Morocco. They commented that the Freelander was more capable on soft
sand because it was lighter. I think the new Disco's kerb weight is
around 2.7 tonnes - ridiculous!
Having also read (with envy) the trip reports & links that people have
posted this week, all featuring LR 110s, I was struck by one writer's
comment that he averaged 24mpg on road across Europe. OK, he was
loaded up with gubbins on the roof, but I averaged around 29mpg across
Europe last summer with a fair old load on board (but admittedly no
roof-rack) in my "heavier on fuel" LC.
And we were seriously grateful for my "car-like" air-conditioning when
it got up to 40 deg C in Italy!
We have a couple of friends here with LR 110 County Station Wagons, and
in both cases the wives regard journeys of >50 miles a severe endurance
test, especially in hot weather.
Christopher Bell
|Quote
|The Land Rover Defender's superb axle articulation and lightweight body
gives
|it a distinct advantage in mud, snow and soft sand. If these
|conditions are not likely to be encountered, then the leaf-sprung
Toyota
|Land Cruisers are comfortable and reliable, though heavier on fuel.
Many
|Toyota models have large overhanging front bumpers, rear steps and
running
|boards, which negate off-road performance. Coil-sprung Toyota Land
Cruisers
|are less reliable, and the latest models with independent front
suspension
|are best avoided. Nissan Patrols lack off-road agility and, as with
American
|four-wheel drives, their large engines are heavy on fuel.
|Unquote
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On 9/11/06 12:18, "Christopher Bell" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Chris
I think it is generally accepted that a short wheel base LR is probably the
best off roader still, you're right. But then again we use our cars for
more than that so we compromise. Most people's cruisers are lifted for
overlanding and off road so entry and departure angles rarely matter that
much unless you go extreme but weight makes a difference.
As for tyres, it will be intere4sting to see if anyone has experience of
Michelins they can share...
Jeremy
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
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I have 255/100R16 (9.00R16) Michelin XZLs fitted to my 80. I like them a
lot. They have reasonable on road manners and are good off road. I have
had problems with beads popping off rims when running very low pressures off
road. I am about to fit a set of bead locks to hopefully cure this problem.
When the pressures are dropped down the tread lengthens incredibly. They
also have the reputation of being a very tough tyre.
I am off to the Sahara in January with another list member who will be
running the same tyre. We will let you know how we get on.
Ian Rubie
Hampshire UK
96 HDJ80 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Clive
You quote:
"BFG tyres are reputed to get torn to bits on African roads. There is a
Michelin that seems to be the current flavour. Does anyone know if
there is truth in this?"
Dunno what the current flavour is, I've run BFGs since I started overlanding
in North Africa and I've never had a problem.
On one trip, my mate's brand new Michelin tyres kept rupturing - guess he
was going far too fast over the hamadas....!
I say, stick with what you know (re tyres etc) this way you can reduce some
potential problems just waiting to happen.
My 5p's worth
Renate
 
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Ian
Where in the Sahara are you going to be and for how long?
Re Michelin tyres:
I drove on a set of 7.50 x 16 Michelin XS (sand tyres) in Lybia in
2001 and they performed quite well, sustaining only one repairable
puncture. I never go seriously stuck and low pressue driving did not
cause any damage at all to the carcass. Being 7.50 x 16 they are on
the narrow side but that's not a problem at all when the pressue is
down to 12-15psi.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
 
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Ian,
Aha, Saharatravel. I met Frank this afternoon.
It looks we will follow in your footsteps in mid February, also with
another ELCO member. But rather than going back via the lakes, after
Akakus we'll turn west and come back via Algeria.
--
Rgds,
Roman (London, UK)
'92 HDJ80
On 11/9/06, Ian Rubie <[Email address removed]> wrote:
 
G

Guest

Guest
As I mentioned earlier, the stories re tyre shredding date back to 1998 and
1992-3 respectively.
On 9/11/06 18:00, "Reno Lamb" <[Email address removed]> wrote:
Jeremy Llewellyn-Jones
Mob: 07831 458 793
--
 
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