ome - how much to lift ?

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Guest
Hi,
there are several options for OME lift on hdj80 and therefore I'm a bit
confused since on kzj95 there was basically only one option.
Any recommendations ? I was thinking about 8 cm lift (3.15") but it
requires caster kit (I have no experiences with such kit). I'm really
looking for a robust solution and I'm wandering if such a kit might
represent a weak point. 6 cm lift (aprox 2.5") seams simpler ...
regards,
Tomaz
 
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Guest

Guest
Tomaz
2.5" seems to be the most popular - and simpler.
Only other mod required is adjustment to brake portioning valve.
I'm currently looking at OME Long Travel Remote (LTR) Shock Absorber
system - worth a look at but a bit pricey
Niall
HDJ80
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi Tomaz,
It really comes down to what you actually want to do with the truck.
If you look at the Slee site http://www.sleeoffroad.com you can see a
variety of different lift options - most of the extreme ones are geared
up for rock crawling or severe mud plugging.
Over here the standard is the 2.5"/5cm OME lift some will argue over
the requirement for the caster kit - personally I would recommend it -
it might not make much difference on tarmac, but does on rougher roads.
So, what are your plans?
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

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Hi Julian,
I'm preparing the car for overlanding (africa mostly ... ) therefore I'm
looking for a lift which will still offer good overall behavior. The
main idea is to gain some space for larger tires.
In your case with 2.5 - what is the tire size you use ? What are the
largest tires you can use ?
Regarding the caster kit - as far as I understood it offerers better
control - so I'm quite sure I will go for it.
I'm aware that extreme lifts put more stress on some components but I'm
not really sure if 3.15" lift is in this class. What do you think ?
Regards,
Tomaz
 
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G

Guest

Guest
Hi Nial,
regarding LTR - I just bought hdj80 and it has to be ready till November
- so a lot of cost and effort still to come and in this situation the
LTR's are just to expensive.
Is the adjustment of break portioning valve described in OME
installation instructions ? If not where can I get more info about that ?
Thanks & regards,
Tomaz
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi Tomaz,
A workshop manual will provide more info.
It's actually best to leave the adjustment until you are fully loaded and
the suspension has had a chance to settle down.
The proportioning valve regulates the flow of brake fluid to the front and
rear brakes based on the amount of weight in the back of the vehicle - as
the back of the vehicle gets lower with weight, and arm from the
proportioning valve (attached to the chassis) is connected to the rear axle
and as the axle moves it adjust's the flow.
The simplest way to set it up is to take the vehicle for a run when fully
tested and then brake hard a few times - if you find the front brakes
locking up before the rears you need to adjust the brake bias more towards
the back. If the rear brakes lock up before the front then you need to
adjust it the other way.
As you look at the back of your rear axle from the back of the car, you
will see the proportioning valve just in front of the axle to the left, up
on the chassis, and then you will see a thin rod go up and over the axle to
a threaded rod on the right hand side of the diff at the back of the axle.
If the brakes at the front are locking before the rears, you need to
lenghten the distance between rod from the valve and the rear axle and if
the rears lock before the fronts, do it the other way around.
You will most likely have to remove the assembly from the rear axle to make
the adjustments and it is well worth daily soaking the threaded rod and
ruts with WD40 for a few days beforehand.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
G

Guest

Guest
Hi Tomaz,
OK, the ideal setup then would be the 2.5"/50mm lift, that is the most
common.
I had 285/75/16s BFG ATs, I wouldn't want to go much bigger because it
will affect the speedo, gearing, etc.
I am still debating whether 285 is too wide, I certainly had to air down
more on sand than Lio who had 235/85/16s (about the same diameter) and the
235s are a more popular size in Africa.
Lio also thought they would be better for fuel consumption on tarmac due
to the lower surface area, but I've not had time to investigate things
further.
The 235s are about 28mm narrower in diameter, so he lost 14mm on height.
You can play around with tyre sizes at
http://www.tyresave.co.uk/tyresize.html
Having said that, I have always fancied the BFG Traction tyres that are a
compromise tyre between AT and MT that only come in the 235/85 size.
Also bear in mind the following when looking at OME setups:
The springs and shocks are rated for different loads - make sure you have
the right ones for the loads you are carrying (I have a chart somewhere if
you want a copy).
The OME springs are longer on one side than the other - this is to cater
for the extreme camber on the roads in Aus to deal with the heavy rains.
In Aus driving on the left hand side as we do in the UK, they advise to
put the longer spring on the passenger side (LHS) to counter the camber,
however in the UK we don't have so much camber so I always advise having
the longer spring on the drivers side to counter the weight of the driver
(I have seen the size of some of you ;-)
Putting the longer springs on the drivers side (RHS) helps in Europe and
more importantly in places like Morocco where they do have more camber.
My 80 already had the springs on it when I got it and they have set it up
the Aus (wrong) way - I don't notice it much in the UK, but when in
Morocco I definitely felt that I was driving at an angle, which wasn't fun
when you see the states of their roads.
If you are in Europe and have a Left hand drive vehicle, put the longer
springs on the passenger (RHS) side.
Depending on your loading it will put more stress on things like the UJs
on the propshafts and you will also need to consider having adjustable
panhard rods to compensate fort the lift, unfortunately this is an area I
haven't looked into much.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Julian
| I am still debating whether 285 is too wide, I certainly had to air
down
| more on sand than Lio who had 235/85/16s (about the same diameter) and
the
| 235s are a more popular size in Africa.
Pure curiosity as I'm very unlikely to be allowed to drive to Africa,
but ...
.=2E. why did you have to air down more on your *wider* tyres? Surely
airing down is to increase tread contact area, which you had more of
anyway. Or is the "75" vs "85" in the tyre spec more significant?
Certainly my experience on good old British mud is that my standard 275
wide tyres are a good recipe for driving sideways, although their
road-holding on tarmac is excellent - I've yet to manage to skid the
thing on a road in 7 years & 80k miles.
Christopher Bell
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Guest
Hi Julian,
thank you very much for your answer.
Regarding the tire size I'm thinking about 235/85.
I didn't know this thing about using different springs on RHS and LHS so
haven't considered it while doing the lift on kzj95. How big should be
difference in spring length ?
Regards,
Tomaz
 
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Hi Christopher,
For sand (and I guess things like snow) you want a longer tread not
wider. A narrower tyre when aired down gives the longer tread, with
the 285s I had to air down lower to get the same effect.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Mobile: 07971 540362
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

Guest
| For sand (and I guess things like snow) you want a longer tread not
| wider. A narrower tyre when aired down gives the longer tread, with
| the 285s I had to air down lower to get the same effect.
Interesting, thanks.
CB
____________________________________________________________
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systems are scanned for acceptability of content and viruses
 
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Guest

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Hi Tomaz,
It depends on you loading, but I think from memory it is around 10-15mm.
You can get packing rings to counter the difference if you want, but I
wouldn't when considering the Moroccan roads.
Another thing when kitting the car out is to be conscious of the actual
weight distribution within the car, try to keep heavy things between the
axles with the weight equally distributed within the vehicle.
I have always toyed with the idea of picking up from ebay a set of
weighing pads, one to put under each wheel so you can check the weights as
you load the vehicle - we used to have them on the farm for weighing
grain trailers and I have seen them come up on ebay for not too much
money. If I was prepping more vehicles a year I would definitely get
some.
--
Regards,
Julian Voelcker
Skype: julianvoelcker
Cirencester, United Kingdom
1994 HDJ80, 2.5" OME Lift
 
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Guest

Guest
Hi Julian,
regarding the packaging I learned my lesson during my trips and I'm very
strict about this (havy loads as low as possible, equal distribution
etc...) and it is usually the main issue me and my girlfriend are
arguing about since she is very innovative in the filed of packaging :)
(over-sized baggage, samsonite suitcases etc...)
regards,
Tomaz
 
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