Help required - Rear Brake service

Brett

Well-Known Member
I am in uk
Mar 10, 2010
458
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Norwich, Norfolk, UK
Hello Chaps,

I started replacing my rear discs & pads last night & came across a problem. When removing the sliding pins for the caliper the rubber dust boot got torn up.

Firstly is it correct to have only one rubber boot on one pin & a rubber plug in the caliper for the other pin.

Secondly, I've fitted the new disc & pads & remounted the caliper. Is it ok to leave the rubber sleeves out or are they necessary? If so can anyone advise a part number please? On Toyo DIY I can only see the rubber plug P/No. 90950-01301.

Thanks.
 

Andy Harvey

Well-Known Member
Mar 6, 2010
343
3
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Cheltenham, UK
Brett.

They should be there but to be honest, mine never had them. They are there to stop the sliding pins getting water/dirt in them so they always slide. As long as you apply a thin film of grease to the pins you should be OK but if you can get hold of them from Ian or Toyota then best to do so, they weren't put there by accident.

Not sure completely on what should be there but I think there should be a rubber plug and boot on both pins.

Interestingly the Max Ellery Manual doesn't show them at all. I'll have a look in the FSM.

Edit.

According to the FSM, 1 dust boot and one plug total - I think this is just for diagramatic simplicity though. I do think it should be a plug and dust boot on each.
 

Chris

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Feb 24, 2010
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I did exactly the same this weekend. Fortunately as the rear brakes on an 80 are the rear brakes on a 90, I still had spares in the garage. The parts picture does not bear resemblance to the part itself. It never has - even at the main dealer. The top is a tube that runs full width and the bottom is a single bellow and a rubber bung. Do not use copper grease in there. It hardens and makes the caliper work poorly. I am sure that Ian can get the bits, but I don't know if he stocks them. Main agent can usually get them next working day. Personally I would NOT want to run without them. You're not going to crash without them, but I bet that it would smash up the sliding pin bolts quite badly and make a heck of a noise.

47775-22010 is the bellow for the bottom
47769-22010 is the top pin slide tube boot thing


BUT 04479-60030 is a repair kit which contains the piston seals too and all the tube bits for both sides.


Try that and see what you get. I fitted the 90 parts to the 80 caliper with no problem Trust me they're the same.

Chris
 
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Andy Harvey

Well-Known Member
Mar 6, 2010
343
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Cheltenham, UK
Chris said:
Do not use copper grease in there. It hardens and makes the caliper work poorly
Chris.

Interesting point that, have never had that happen however I guess if it got contaminated with lots of dust it most likely would do.

Just shows how short my memory of my 80 is - I only changed the rear brakes on it last summer and had forgotten the layout of the pins - just do remember that there weren't any dust boots on it - had long gone away - I know they harden up and brake off pretty easily. So on the sliding tube (Bush) are the dust shields integral to the bush?
 

adrianr

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Mar 4, 2010
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Off in the trees, again
Interesting point that, have never had that happen however I guess if it got contaminated with lots of dust it most likely would do.


Andy from what i have heard its not really to do with that. my understanding is that the "greasy" bit in the copper grease evaporates.

i was told to get red rubber grease and use that.
 

Chris

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Well copper grease is designed to melt away leaving a copper residue to prevent seizing., It is not really a lubricant. And it does harden and attract dirt like you say. I use red rubber grease or something fairly light and less clarty than CG. Deffo should be little gaiters in there though. You have to be very careful not to nip and rip them when you put the caliper back on. Easily done! There is a pin hole in the end of them to equalize air pressure. When you fill them with grease, slide the caliper across and all the spare grease will squirt out like silly string.
Spent a lot of time on Toyota brakes!

Chris
 

Jon Wildsmith

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Feb 24, 2010
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The copper grease contains a solvent which attacks the rubber making first a stiff goo and then a dry non slip rubber mess that stops the pins moving. Use a (usually red) veg grease. Not sure about the silicon greases, I've not tested what they do to rubber.
 

Brett

Well-Known Member
I am in uk
Mar 10, 2010
458
21
38
Norwich, Norfolk, UK
Brett said:
Excellent info thanks chaps.

I've pm'd Ian but I'll pop into the dealers this afternoon.

Regards,
Brett
Didn't have a lot of luck odering the parts individually, the rubber sleeve type thing (47769-22010) has had it's part number superseded, unfortunately the new part (47769-12030) thrown up by the dealers EPC is a steel bush still with the same description of Bush, Cylinder Slide.

I've had to order the complete repair kit as well now but the dealer won't refund on the incorrect part as I gave the part number & it's to low a value £6.50 each (x 2) :x
 

tomrichardson

Active Member
I got a caliper repair kit from the main dealer. had all i needed for caliper slides and also piston seals.
my caliper rubbers were torn and twisted and i was having serious trouble with binding brakes and weird goings on. all sorted with new rubbers so i certainly wouldn't advise running without them. they are there to keep the sliding part moving at 90' to the disc.
I use silicone grease on anything with rubber now. it says it is safe to use with rubber. can be a bit sticky and attract dirt on assembly if your not careful though. also it resists melting at high temps. good stuff i reckon.
regards, tom.
 

Julian Voelcker

Well-Known Member
Mar 5, 2010
313
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Herefordshire, UK
Copperease rots the rubbers causing them to swell and either tear or clamp the carrier bolts so best to keep away from brakes.

Ideally get some red rubber grease from http://www.frost.co.uk/item_Detail.asp?productID=9198&frostProductName=Red Rubber Grease (500g) or if you have a calliper rebuild kit you may have some left over.

If you are going to replace the seals on the carrier, it is well worth getting a drill and drilling out the holes and use a sharp pick to clean out the grooves where the seals mount to clear out any rust and then use a rust treatment product (we use a dinitrol product that stays liquid and protects).

Also make sure the carrier bolts are cleaned up and then liberally apply the grease to them before fitting.

The most common problems we come across are the carrier bolts seizing either due to the problems induced by the use of copperease or from rust - if you can counter those you should be fine.
 
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